PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

A pilot study on the impact of dopamine, serotonin, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype on long-term functional outcomes after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Abstract Many that survive an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage experience lasting physical disability, which might be improved by medications with effects on the dopaminergic, serotonergic, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor neurotransmitter systems. But it is not clear which patients are most likely to benefit from these therapies. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the relationship of genetic polymorphisms in these pathways with 12-month functional outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.
PMID
Related Publications

S100B as an additional prognostic marker in subarachnoid aneurysmal hemorrhage.

Genetic variation in soluble epoxide hydrolase: association with outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Evaluation of a revised Glasgow Coma Score scale in predicting long-term outcome of poor grade aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients.

Elevated cardiac troponin I and functional recovery and disability in patients after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Cardiac and central vascular functional alterations in the acute phase of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Subarachnoid hemorrhage

brain-derived neurotrophic factor

disability

dopamine

serotonin

Journal Title sage open medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28894586
OWN - NLM
STAT- PubMed-not-MEDLINE
DA  - 20170912
LR  - 20170915
IS  - 2050-3121 (Print)
IS  - 2050-3121 (Linking)
VI  - 5
DP  - 2017
TI  - A pilot study on the impact of dopamine, serotonin, and brain-derived
      neurotrophic factor genotype on long-term functional outcomes after subarachnoid 
      hemorrhage.
PG  - 2050312117726725
LID - 10.1177/2050312117726725 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVES: Many that survive an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage experience
      lasting physical disability, which might be improved by medications with effects 
      on the dopaminergic, serotonergic, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor
      neurotransmitter systems. But it is not clear which patients are most likely to
      benefit from these therapies. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the 
      relationship of genetic polymorphisms in these pathways with 12-month functional 
      outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. METHODS: Subjects were
      recruited at the time of admission as a part of a larger parent study. Genotypes 
      were generated using the Affymetrix genome-wide human single-nucleotide
      polymorphism array 6.0. Those within dopaminergic, serotonergic, and
      brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathways were analyzed for associations with
      functional outcomes at 12 months post aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage using
      the Glasgow Outcome Scale and the Modified Rankin Scale. RESULTS: The 154
      subjects were 55.8 +/- 11.3 years old and 74% female; they had Fisher scores of
      2.95 +/- 0.67, Hunt/Hess scores of 2.66 +/- 1.13, and admission Glasgow Coma
      Scale scores of 12.52 +/- 3.79. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the serotonin 
      receptor genes 1B and 1E and dopamine receptor D2 were associated with greater
      disability (odds ratio: 3.88-3.25, confidence interval: 1.01-14.77), while
      single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the serotonin receptor genes 2A and 2C and
      dopamine receptor D5 conferred a risk of poor recovery (odds ratio: 3.31-2.32,
      confidence interval: 1.00-10.80). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the same
      serotonin genes, and within the dopamine receptor gene D2, were associated with
      greater recovery after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (odds ratio: 0.17-0.34,
      confidence interval: 0.05-0.89). CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that there
      may be an association between genetic factors and functional outcomes post
      stroke.
FAU - Stanfill, Ansley
AU  - Stanfill A
AD  - Acute and Tertiary Care, College of Nursing, The University of Tennessee Health
      Science Center, Memphis, TN, USA.
AD  - Health Promotion & Development, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh,
      Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
AD  - Department of Genetics, Genomics and Informatics, College of Medicine, The
      University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, USA.
FAU - Simpson, Claire
AU  - Simpson C
AD  - Department of Genetics, Genomics and Informatics, College of Medicine, The
      University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, USA.
FAU - Sherwood, Paula
AU  - Sherwood P
AD  - Acute & Tertiary Care, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh,
      PA, USA.
FAU - Poloyac, Samuel
AU  - Poloyac S
AD  - School of Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
FAU - Crago, Elizabeth
AU  - Crago E
AD  - Acute & Tertiary Care, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh,
      PA, USA.
FAU - Kim, Hyungsuk
AU  - Kim H
AD  - National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, 
      MD, USA.
FAU - Conley, Yvette
AU  - Conley Y
AD  - Health Promotion & Development, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh,
      Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
AD  - Department of Human Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
LA  - eng
GR  - R01 NR004339/NR/NINR NIH HHS/United States
GR  - T32 NR009759/NR/NINR NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170831
PL  - England
TA  - SAGE Open Med
JT  - SAGE open medicine
JID - 101624744
PMC - PMC5582657
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Subarachnoid hemorrhage
OT  - brain-derived neurotrophic factor
OT  - disability
OT  - dopamine
OT  - serotonin
COI - Declaration of conflicting interests: The author(s) declared no potential
      conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or
      publication of this article.
EDAT- 2017/09/13 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/13 06:01
CRDT- 2017/09/13 06:00
PHST- 2016/12/09 [received]
PHST- 2017/07/23 [accepted]
AID - 10.1177/2050312117726725 [doi]
AID - 10.1177_2050312117726725 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - SAGE Open Med. 2017 Aug 31;5:2050312117726725. doi: 10.1177/2050312117726725.
      eCollection 2017.