PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Pandemic-related health behavior: repeat episodes of influenza-like illness related to the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic.

Abstract The Houston Health Department (HHD) in Texas tracks influenza-like illness (ILI) in the community through its Influenza Sentinel Surveillance Program, which began in 2008. After the influenza A(H1N1) pandemic (pH1N1) in 2009, investigators sought to assess the feasibility of this program as a non-traditional data source for tracking and monitoring care-seeking activities. Through the process of characterizing and describing patients who had 'return visits', or who were considered the heaviest ILI-related care-utilizers, the investigators sought to understand the strengths and limitations of this data source. Data used for this study were obtained from a multispecialty clinic in Houston, Texas between August 2008 and January 2011 across three phases: pre-pH1N1, pH1N1, and post-pH1N1. The data, which comprised of 4047 patient visits, yielded 150 return visits. We found an increase in the number of visits for ILI and proportion of return visits during the pandemic phase (pH1N1), as well as differences in the likelihood of a return visit between genders and age groups. More broadly, the findings of this study provide important considerations for future research and expose important gaps in using surveillance data to assess sick-role behaviors.
PMID
Related Publications

Nationwide surveillance of influenza during the pandemic (2009-10) and post-pandemic (2010-11) periods in Taiwan.

Evaluation of a pilot respiratory virus surveillance system linking electronic health record and diagnostic data.

Impact of seasonal and pandemic influenza on emergency department visits, 2003-2010, Ontario, Canada.

The burden and severity of illness due to 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in a large US city during the late summer and early fall of 2009.

Comparison of five influenza surveillance systems during the 2009 pandemic and their association with media attention.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Health Behavior

Pandemics

Sentinel Surveillance

Keywords

H1N1

Influenza-like illness

Sentinel Surveillance

care utilization

care-seeking behavior

Journal Title epidemiology and infection
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28726598
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170720
DCOM- 20170828
LR  - 20170828
IS  - 1469-4409 (Electronic)
IS  - 0950-2688 (Linking)
VI  - 145
IP  - 12
DP  - 2017 Sep
TI  - Pandemic-related health behavior: repeat episodes of influenza-like illness
      related to the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic.
PG  - 2611-2617
LID - 10.1017/S0950268817001467 [doi]
AB  - The Houston Health Department (HHD) in Texas tracks influenza-like illness (ILI) 
      in the community through its Influenza Sentinel Surveillance Program, which began
      in 2008. After the influenza A(H1N1) pandemic (pH1N1) in 2009, investigators
      sought to assess the feasibility of this program as a non-traditional data source
      for tracking and monitoring care-seeking activities. Through the process of
      characterizing and describing patients who had 'return visits', or who were
      considered the heaviest ILI-related care-utilizers, the investigators sought to
      understand the strengths and limitations of this data source. Data used for this 
      study were obtained from a multispecialty clinic in Houston, Texas between August
      2008 and January 2011 across three phases: pre-pH1N1, pH1N1, and post-pH1N1. The 
      data, which comprised of 4047 patient visits, yielded 150 return visits. We found
      an increase in the number of visits for ILI and proportion of return visits
      during the pandemic phase (pH1N1), as well as differences in the likelihood of a 
      return visit between genders and age groups. More broadly, the findings of this
      study provide important considerations for future research and expose important
      gaps in using surveillance data to assess sick-role behaviors.
FAU - Mgbere, O
AU  - Mgbere O
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2863-6284
AD  - Houston Health Department,Houston, Texas,USA.
FAU - Ngo, K
AU  - Ngo K
AD  - Department of Pediatrics,Baylor College of Medicine,Houston, Texas,USA.
FAU - Khuwaja, S
AU  - Khuwaja S
AD  - Houston Health Department,Houston, Texas,USA.
FAU - Mouzoon, M
AU  - Mouzoon M
AD  - Kelsey-Seybold Clinic,Houston, Texas,USA.
FAU - Greisinger, A
AU  - Greisinger A
AD  - Kelsey Research Foundation,Houston, Texas,USA.
FAU - Arafat, R
AU  - Arafat R
AD  - Houston Health Department,Houston, Texas,USA.
FAU - Markee, J
AU  - Markee J
AD  - Kelsey-Seybold Clinic,Houston, Texas,USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170720
PL  - England
TA  - Epidemiol Infect
JT  - Epidemiology and infection
JID - 8703737
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Child
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - Female
MH  - *Health Behavior
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant
MH  - Infant, Newborn
MH  - Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/*physiology
MH  - Influenza, Human/*epidemiology
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - *Pandemics
MH  - *Sentinel Surveillance
MH  - Texas/epidemiology
MH  - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - H1N1
OT  - Influenza-like illness
OT  - Sentinel Surveillance
OT  - care utilization
OT  - care-seeking behavior
EDAT- 2017/07/21 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/29 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/21 06:00
AID - S0950268817001467 [pii]
AID - 10.1017/S0950268817001467 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Epidemiol Infect. 2017 Sep;145(12):2611-2617. doi: 10.1017/S0950268817001467.
      Epub 2017 Jul 20.