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Mosquitoes on a plane: Disinsection will not stop the spread of vector-borne pathogens, a simulation study.

Abstract Mosquito-borne diseases are increasingly being recognized as global threats, with increased air travel accelerating their occurrence in travelers and their spread to new locations. Since the early days of aviation, concern over the possible transportation of infected mosquitoes has led to recommendations to disinsect aircraft. Despite rare reports of mosquitoes, most likely transported on aircraft, infecting people far from endemics areas, it is unclear how important the role of incidentally transported mosquitoes is compared to the role of traveling humans. We used data for Plasmodium falciparum and dengue viruses to estimate the probability of introduction of these pathogens by mosquitoes and by humans via aircraft under ideal conditions. The probability of introduction of either pathogen by mosquitoes is low due to few mosquitoes being found on aircraft, low infection prevalence among mosquitoes, and high mortality. Even without disinsection, introduction via infected human travelers was far more likely than introduction by infected mosquitoes; more than 1000 times more likely for P. falciparum and more than 200 times more likely for dengue viruses. Even in the absence of disinsection and under the most favorable conditions, introduction of mosquito-borne pathogens via air travel is far more likely to occur as a result of an infected human travelling rather than the incidental transportation of infected mosquitoes. Thus, while disinsection may serve a role in preventing the spread of vector species and other invasive insects, it is unlikely to impact the spread of mosquito-borne pathogens.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title plos neglected tropical diseases
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28672006
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
DA  - 20170703
LR  - 20170703
IS  - 1935-2735 (Electronic)
IS  - 1935-2727 (Linking)
VI  - 11
IP  - 7
DP  - 2017 Jul 03
TI  - Mosquitoes on a plane: Disinsection will not stop the spread of vector-borne
      pathogens, a simulation study.
PG  - e0005683
LID - 10.1371/journal.pntd.0005683 [doi]
AB  - Mosquito-borne diseases are increasingly being recognized as global threats, with
      increased air travel accelerating their occurrence in travelers and their spread 
      to new locations. Since the early days of aviation, concern over the possible
      transportation of infected mosquitoes has led to recommendations to disinsect
      aircraft. Despite rare reports of mosquitoes, most likely transported on
      aircraft, infecting people far from endemics areas, it is unclear how important
      the role of incidentally transported mosquitoes is compared to the role of
      traveling humans. We used data for Plasmodium falciparum and dengue viruses to
      estimate the probability of introduction of these pathogens by mosquitoes and by 
      humans via aircraft under ideal conditions. The probability of introduction of
      either pathogen by mosquitoes is low due to few mosquitoes being found on
      aircraft, low infection prevalence among mosquitoes, and high mortality. Even
      without disinsection, introduction via infected human travelers was far more
      likely than introduction by infected mosquitoes; more than 1000 times more likely
      for P. falciparum and more than 200 times more likely for dengue viruses. Even in
      the absence of disinsection and under the most favorable conditions, introduction
      of mosquito-borne pathogens via air travel is far more likely to occur as a
      result of an infected human travelling rather than the incidental transportation 
      of infected mosquitoes. Thus, while disinsection may serve a role in preventing
      the spread of vector species and other invasive insects, it is unlikely to impact
      the spread of mosquito-borne pathogens.
FAU - Mier-Y-Teran-Romero, Luis
AU  - Mier-Y-Teran-Romero L
AD  - Dengue Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and
      Prevention, San Juan, PR.
FAU - Tatem, Andrew J
AU  - Tatem AJ
AD  - WorldPop, Department of Geography and Environment, University of Southampton,
      Southampton, United Kingdom.
AD  - Flowminder Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden.
FAU - Johansson, Michael A
AU  - Johansson MA
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5090-7722
AD  - Dengue Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and
      Prevention, San Juan, PR.
AD  - Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics, Harvard TH Chan School of Public
      Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170703
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS Negl Trop Dis
JT  - PLoS neglected tropical diseases
JID - 101291488
EDAT- 2017/07/04 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/04 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/04 06:00
PHST- 2017/03/13 [received]
PHST- 2017/06/07 [accepted]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pntd.0005683 [doi]
AID - PNTD-D-17-00368 [pii]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2017 Jul 3;11(7):e0005683. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0005683.