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Emerging infectious disease agents and blood safety in Australia: spotlight on Zika virus.

Abstract Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) are infectious diseases whose incidence has increased in humans in the past 20 years or could increase in the near future. EID agents may represent a threat to blood safety if they infect humans, cause a clinically significant illness, include an asymptomatic blood phase in the course of infection, and are transmissible by transfusion. EID agents are typically not well characterised, but there is a consensus that we can expect ongoing outbreaks. Strategies to manage the risk to blood safety from EIDs include ongoing surveillance, regular risk assessments, modelling transfusion transmission risk, and deferral of donors with a recent travel history to outbreak areas. The 2015-16 Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak in the Americas is the largest reported ZIKV outbreak to date, and it highlights the unpredictable nature of EID outbreaks and how quickly they can become a major public health problem. This ZIKV outbreak has provided evidence of a causal link between the virus and microcephaly in newborns. In assessing the potential risk of ZIKV to blood safety in Australia, it should be noted that a relatively small number of imported ZIKV infections have been reported in Australia, there have been no reported cases of local ZIKV transmission, and the geographical distribution of the potential ZIKV mosquito vector in Australia (Aedes aegypti) is limited to northern Queensland. Moreover, reported transfusion-transmitted ZIKV cases worldwide are rare. At present, ZIKV represents a low risk to blood safety in Australia.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title the medical journal of australia
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28566073
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170601
LR  - 20170601
IS  - 1326-5377 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-729X (Linking)
VI  - 206
IP  - 10
DP  - 2017 Jun 05
TI  - Emerging infectious disease agents and blood safety in Australia: spotlight on
      Zika virus.
PG  - 455-460
AB  - Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) are infectious diseases whose incidence has
      increased in humans in the past 20 years or could increase in the near future.
      EID agents may represent a threat to blood safety if they infect humans, cause a 
      clinically significant illness, include an asymptomatic blood phase in the course
      of infection, and are transmissible by transfusion. EID agents are typically not 
      well characterised, but there is a consensus that we can expect ongoing
      outbreaks. Strategies to manage the risk to blood safety from EIDs include
      ongoing surveillance, regular risk assessments, modelling transfusion
      transmission risk, and deferral of donors with a recent travel history to
      outbreak areas. The 2015-16 Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak in the Americas is the
      largest reported ZIKV outbreak to date, and it highlights the unpredictable
      nature of EID outbreaks and how quickly they can become a major public health
      problem. This ZIKV outbreak has provided evidence of a causal link between the
      virus and microcephaly in newborns. In assessing the potential risk of ZIKV to
      blood safety in Australia, it should be noted that a relatively small number of
      imported ZIKV infections have been reported in Australia, there have been no
      reported cases of local ZIKV transmission, and the geographical distribution of
      the potential ZIKV mosquito vector in Australia (Aedes aegypti) is limited to
      northern Queensland. Moreover, reported transfusion-transmitted ZIKV cases
      worldwide are rare. At present, ZIKV represents a low risk to blood safety in
      Australia.
FAU - Kiely, Philip
AU  - Kiely P
AD  - Australian Red Cross Blood Service, Melbourne, VIC [email protected]
FAU - Wood, Erica M
AU  - Wood EM
AD  - Monash University, Melbourne, VIC.
FAU - Gambhir, Manoj
AU  - Gambhir M
AD  - Monash University, Melbourne, VIC.
FAU - Cheng, Allen C
AU  - Cheng AC
AD  - Monash University, Melbourne, VIC.
FAU - McQuilten, Zoe K
AU  - McQuilten ZK
AD  - Monash University, Melbourne, VIC.
FAU - Seed, Clive R
AU  - Seed CR
AD  - Australian Red Cross Blood Service, Melbourne, VIC.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - Australia
TA  - Med J Aust
JT  - The Medical journal of Australia
JID - 0400714
EDAT- 2017/06/02 06:00
MHDA- 2017/06/02 06:00
CRDT- 2017/06/02 06:00
PHST- 2016/07/13 [received]
PHST- 2016/12/07 [accepted]
AID - 10.5694/mja16.00833 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Med J Aust. 2017 Jun 5;206(10):455-460.

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