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Zika Virus: Common Questions and Answers.

Abstract Since local mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus was first reported in Brazil in early 2015, the virus has spread rapidly, with active transmission reported in at least 61 countries and territories worldwide, including the United States. Zika virus infection during pregnancy is a cause of microcephaly and other severe brain anomalies. The virus is transmitted primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes mosquito, but other routes of transmission include sexual, mother-to-fetus during pregnancy, mother-to-infant at delivery, laboratory exposure, and, possibly, transfusion of blood products. Most persons with Zika virus infection are asymptomatic or have only mild symptoms; hospitalizations and deaths are rare. When symptoms are present, maculopapular rash, fever, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis are most common. Zika virus testing is recommended for persons with possible exposure (those who have traveled to or live in an area with active transmission, or persons who had sex without a condom with a person with possible exposure) if they have symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease. Testing is also recommended for pregnant women with possible exposure, regardless of whether symptoms are present. Treatment is supportive, and no vaccine is currently available. The primary methods of prevention include avoiding bites of infected Aedes mosquitoes and reducing the risk of sexual transmission. Pregnant women should not travel to areas with active Zika virus transmission, and men and women who are planning to conceive in the near future should consider avoiding nonessential travel to these areas. Condoms can reduce the risk of sexual transmission.
PMID
Related Publications

Contraceptive Use Among Nonpregnant and Postpartum Women at Risk for Unintended Pregnancy, and Female High School Students, in the Context of Zika Preparedness - United States, 2011-2013 and 2015.

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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title american family physician
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28409618
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170414
LR  - 20170414
IS  - 1532-0650 (Electronic)
IS  - 0002-838X (Linking)
VI  - 95
IP  - 8
DP  - 2017 Apr 15
TI  - Zika Virus: Common Questions and Answers.
PG  - 507-513
AB  - Since local mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus was first reported in
      Brazil in early 2015, the virus has spread rapidly, with active transmission
      reported in at least 61 countries and territories worldwide, including the United
      States. Zika virus infection during pregnancy is a cause of microcephaly and
      other severe brain anomalies. The virus is transmitted primarily through the bite
      of an infected Aedes mosquito, but other routes of transmission include sexual,
      mother-to-fetus during pregnancy, mother-to-infant at delivery, laboratory
      exposure, and, possibly, transfusion of blood products. Most persons with Zika
      virus infection are asymptomatic or have only mild symptoms; hospitalizations and
      deaths are rare. When symptoms are present, maculopapular rash, fever,
      arthralgia, and conjunctivitis are most common. Zika virus testing is recommended
      for persons with possible exposure (those who have traveled to or live in an area
      with active transmission, or persons who had sex without a condom with a person
      with possible exposure) if they have symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease.
      Testing is also recommended for pregnant women with possible exposure, regardless
      of whether symptoms are present. Treatment is supportive, and no vaccine is
      currently available. The primary methods of prevention include avoiding bites of 
      infected Aedes mosquitoes and reducing the risk of sexual transmission. Pregnant 
      women should not travel to areas with active Zika virus transmission, and men and
      women who are planning to conceive in the near future should consider avoiding
      nonessential travel to these areas. Condoms can reduce the risk of sexual
      transmission.
FAU - Igbinosa, Irogue I
AU  - Igbinosa II
AD  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
FAU - Rabe, Ingrid B
AU  - Rabe IB
AD  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
FAU - Oduyebo, Titilope
AU  - Oduyebo T
AD  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
FAU - Rasmussen, Sonja A
AU  - Rasmussen SA
AD  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Am Fam Physician
JT  - American family physician
JID - 1272646
EDAT- 2017/04/15 06:00
MHDA- 2017/04/15 06:00
CRDT- 2017/04/15 06:00
AID - d13231 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Am Fam Physician. 2017 Apr 15;95(8):507-513.

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