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Molecular snapshot of an intracellular freezing event in an Antarctic nematode.

Abstract The Antarctic nematode, Panagrolaimus sp. DAW1 (formerly called Panagrolaimus davidi), is the best documented example of an organism able to survive intracellular ice formation in all of its compartments. Not only is it able to survive such extreme physiological disruption, but it is able to produce progeny once thawed from such a state. In addition, under slower rates, or less extreme degrees, of cooling, its body remains unfrozen and the vapour pressure difference between the supercooled body fluids and the surrounding ice leads to a process termed cryoprotective dehydration. In contrast to a fairly large body of work in building up our molecular understanding of cryoprotective dehydration, no comparable work has been undertaken on intracellular freezing. This paper describes an experiment subjecting cultures of Panagrolaimus sp. DAW1 to a range of temperatures including a rapid descent to -10 °C, in a medium just prior to, and after, freezing. Through deep sequencing of RNA libraries we have gained a snapshot of which genes are highly abundant when P. sp. DAW1 is undergoing an intracellular freezing event. The onset of freezing correlated with a high production of genes involved in cuticle formation and subsequently, after 24 h in a frozen state, protease production. In addition to the mapping of RNA sequencing, we have focused on a select set of genes arising both from the expression profiles, as well as implicated from other cold tolerance studies, to undertake qPCR. Among the most abundantly represented transcripts in the RNA mapping is the zinc-metalloenzyme, neprilysin, which also shows a particularly strong upregulated signal through qPCR once the nematodes have frozen.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Antarctic

Intracellular freezing

Leucine-rich repeat

Nematode

Neprilysin

Panagrolaimus davidi

Journal Title cryobiology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28082102
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
DA  - 20170113
LR  - 20170117
IS  - 1090-2392 (Electronic)
IS  - 0011-2240 (Linking)
DP  - 2017 Jan 10
TI  - Molecular snapshot of an intracellular freezing event in an Antarctic nematode.
LID - S0011-2240(16)30407-2 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.cryobiol.2017.01.003 [doi]
AB  - The Antarctic nematode, Panagrolaimus sp. DAW1 (formerly called Panagrolaimus
      davidi), is the best documented example of an organism able to survive
      intracellular ice formation in all of its compartments. Not only is it able to
      survive such extreme physiological disruption, but it is able to produce progeny 
      once thawed from such a state. In addition, under slower rates, or less extreme
      degrees, of cooling, its body remains unfrozen and the vapour pressure difference
      between the supercooled body fluids and the surrounding ice leads to a process
      termed cryoprotective dehydration. In contrast to a fairly large body of work in 
      building up our molecular understanding of cryoprotective dehydration, no
      comparable work has been undertaken on intracellular freezing. This paper
      describes an experiment subjecting cultures of Panagrolaimus sp. DAW1 to a range 
      of temperatures including a rapid descent to -10 degrees C, in a medium just
      prior to, and after, freezing. Through deep sequencing of RNA libraries we have
      gained a snapshot of which genes are highly abundant when P. sp. DAW1 is
      undergoing an intracellular freezing event. The onset of freezing correlated with
      a high production of genes involved in cuticle formation and subsequently, after 
      24 h in a frozen state, protease production. In addition to the mapping of RNA
      sequencing, we have focused on a select set of genes arising both from the
      expression profiles, as well as implicated from other cold tolerance studies, to 
      undertake qPCR. Among the most abundantly represented transcripts in the RNA
      mapping is the zinc-metalloenzyme, neprilysin, which also shows a particularly
      strong upregulated signal through qPCR once the nematodes have frozen.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Thorne, Michael A S
AU  - Thorne MA
AD  - British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK. Electronic address: [email protected]
FAU - Seybold, Anna
AU  - Seybold A
AD  - Department of Biochemistry, and Genetics Otago, University of Otago, Dunedin, New
      Zealand.
FAU - Marshall, Craig
AU  - Marshall C
AD  - Department of Biochemistry, and Genetics Otago, University of Otago, Dunedin, New
      Zealand.
FAU - Wharton, David
AU  - Wharton D
AD  - Department of Zoology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170110
PL  - Netherlands
TA  - Cryobiology
JT  - Cryobiology
JID - 0006252
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Antarctic
OT  - Intracellular freezing
OT  - Leucine-rich repeat
OT  - Nematode
OT  - Neprilysin
OT  - Panagrolaimus davidi
EDAT- 2017/01/14 06:00
MHDA- 2017/01/14 06:00
CRDT- 2017/01/14 06:00
PHST- 2016/11/08 [received]
PHST- 2016/12/19 [revised]
PHST- 2017/01/08 [accepted]
AID - S0011-2240(16)30407-2 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.cryobiol.2017.01.003 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Cryobiology. 2017 Jan 10. pii: S0011-2240(16)30407-2. doi:
      10.1016/j.cryobiol.2017.01.003.

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