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Prolonged Detection of Zika Virus RNA in Pregnant Women.

Abstract Zika virus infection during pregnancy is a cause of microcephaly and other fetal brain abnormalities. Reports indicate that the duration of detectable viral RNA in serum after symptom onset is brief. In a recent case report involving a severely affected fetus, Zika virus RNA was detected in maternal serum 10 weeks after symptom onset, longer than the duration of RNA detection in serum previously reported. This report summarizes the clinical and laboratory characteristics of pregnant women with prolonged detection of Zika virus RNA in serum that were reported to the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title obstetrics and gynecology
Publication Year Start
%A Meaney-Delman, Dana; Oduyebo, Titilope; Polen, Kara N. D.; White, Jennifer L.; Bingham, Andrea M.; Slavinski, Sally A.; Heberlein-Larson, Lea; St George, Kirsten; Rakeman, Jennifer L.; Hills, Susan; Olson, Christine K.; Adamski, Alys; Culver Barlow, Lauren; Lee, Ellen H.; Likos, Anna M.; Mu?oz, Jorge L.; Petersen, Emily E.; Dufort, Elizabeth M.; Dean, Amy B.; Cortese, Margaret M.; Santiago, Gilberto A.; Bhatnagar, Julu; Powers, Ann M.; Zaki, Sherif; Petersen, Lyle R.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Honein, Margaret A.
%A U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry Prolonged Viremia Working Group
%T Prolonged Detection of Zika Virus RNA in Pregnant Women.
%J Obstetrics and gynecology
%D 07/2016
%M ENG
%B Zika virus infection during pregnancy is a cause of microcephaly and other fetal brain abnormalities. Reports indicate that the duration of detectable viral RNA in serum after symptom onset is brief. In a recent case report involving a severely affected fetus, Zika virus RNA was detected in maternal serum 10 weeks after symptom onset, longer than the duration of RNA detection in serum previously reported. This report summarizes the clinical and laboratory characteristics of pregnant women with prolonged detection of Zika virus RNA in serum that were reported to the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry.
%Y 10.1097/AOG.0000000000001625
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2016..............M

@Article{Meaney-Delman2016,
author="Meaney-Delman, Dana
and Oduyebo, Titilope
and Polen, Kara N. D.
and White, Jennifer L.
and Bingham, Andrea M.
and Slavinski, Sally A.
and Heberlein-Larson, Lea
and St George, Kirsten
and Rakeman, Jennifer L.
and Hills, Susan
and Olson, Christine K.
and Adamski, Alys
and Culver Barlow, Lauren
and Lee, Ellen H.
and Likos, Anna M.
and Mu{\~n}oz, Jorge L.
and Petersen, Emily E.
and Dufort, Elizabeth M.
and Dean, Amy B.
and Cortese, Margaret M.
and Santiago, Gilberto A.
and Bhatnagar, Julu
and Powers, Ann M.
and Zaki, Sherif
and Petersen, Lyle R.
and Jamieson, Denise J.
and Honein, Margaret A.
and {U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry Prolonged Viremia Working Group}",
title="Prolonged Detection of Zika Virus RNA in Pregnant Women.",
journal="Obstetrics and gynecology",
year="2016",
month="Jul",
day="29",
abstract="Zika virus infection during pregnancy is a cause of microcephaly and other fetal brain abnormalities. Reports indicate that the duration of detectable viral RNA in serum after symptom onset is brief. In a recent case report involving a severely affected fetus, Zika virus RNA was detected in maternal serum 10 weeks after symptom onset, longer than the duration of RNA detection in serum previously reported. This report summarizes the clinical and laboratory characteristics of pregnant women with prolonged detection of Zika virus RNA in serum that were reported to the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry.",
issn="1873-233X",
doi="10.1097/AOG.0000000000001625",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27479770",
language="ENG"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Prolonged Detection of Zika Virus RNA in Pregnant Women.
%A Meaney-Delman, Dana
%A Oduyebo, Titilope
%A Polen, Kara N. D.
%A White, Jennifer L.
%A Bingham, Andrea M.
%A Slavinski, Sally A.
%A Heberlein-Larson, Lea
%A St George, Kirsten
%A Rakeman, Jennifer L.
%A Hills, Susan
%A Olson, Christine K.
%A Adamski, Alys
%A Culver Barlow, Lauren
%A Lee, Ellen H.
%A Likos, Anna M.
%A Mu?oz, Jorge L.
%A Petersen, Emily E.
%A Dufort, Elizabeth M.
%A Dean, Amy B.
%A Cortese, Margaret M.
%A Santiago, Gilberto A.
%A Bhatnagar, Julu
%A Powers, Ann M.
%A Zaki, Sherif
%A Petersen, Lyle R.
%A Jamieson, Denise J.
%A Honein, Margaret A.
%A U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry Prolonged Viremia Working Group
%J Obstetrics and gynecology
%D 2016
%8 Jul 29
%@ 1873-233X
%G ENG
%F Meaney-Delman2016
%X Zika virus infection during pregnancy is a cause of microcephaly and other fetal brain abnormalities. Reports indicate that the duration of detectable viral RNA in serum after symptom onset is brief. In a recent case report involving a severely affected fetus, Zika virus RNA was detected in maternal serum 10 weeks after symptom onset, longer than the duration of RNA detection in serum previously reported. This report summarizes the clinical and laboratory characteristics of pregnant women with prolonged detection of Zika virus RNA in serum that were reported to the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry.
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000001625
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27479770

PT Journal
AU Meaney-Delman, D
   Oduyebo, T
   Polen, KND
   White, JL
   Bingham, AM
   Slavinski, SA
   Heberlein-Larson, L
   St George, K
   Rakeman, JL
   Hills, S
   Olson, CK
   Adamski, A
   Culver Barlow, L
   Lee, EH
   Likos, AM
   Mu?oz, JL
   Petersen, EE
   Dufort, EM
   Dean, AB
   Cortese, MM
   Santiago, GA
   Bhatnagar, J
   Powers, AM
   Zaki, S
   Petersen, LR
   Jamieson, DJ
   Honein, MA
AU U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry Prolonged Viremia Working Group
TI Prolonged Detection of Zika Virus RNA in Pregnant Women.
SO Obstetrics and gynecology
JI Obstet Gynecol
PD Jul
PY 2016
DI 10.1097/AOG.0000000000001625
LA ENG
AB Zika virus infection during pregnancy is a cause of microcephaly and other fetal brain abnormalities. Reports indicate that the duration of detectable viral RNA in serum after symptom onset is brief. In a recent case report involving a severely affected fetus, Zika virus RNA was detected in maternal serum 10 weeks after symptom onset, longer than the duration of RNA detection in serum previously reported. This report summarizes the clinical and laboratory characteristics of pregnant women with prolonged detection of Zika virus RNA in serum that were reported to the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry.
ER

PMID- 27479770
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
DA  - 20160801
LR  - 20160801
IS  - 1873-233X (Electronic)
IS  - 0029-7844 (Linking)
DP  - 2016 Jul 29
TI  - Prolonged Detection of Zika Virus RNA in Pregnant Women.
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Zika virus infection during pregnancy is a cause of microcephaly and
      other fetal brain abnormalities. Reports indicate that the duration of detectable
      viral RNA in serum after symptom onset is brief. In a recent case report
      involving a severely affected fetus, Zika virus RNA was detected in maternal
      serum 10 weeks after symptom onset, longer than the duration of RNA detection in 
      serum previously reported. This report summarizes the clinical and laboratory
      characteristics of pregnant women with prolonged detection of Zika virus RNA in
      serum that were reported to the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry. METHODS: Data were 
      obtained from the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry, an enhanced surveillance system
      of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of confirmed or possible Zika virus
      infection. For this case series, we defined prolonged detection of Zika virus RNA
      as Zika virus RNA detection in serum by real-time reverse
      transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) 14 or more days after symptom
      onset or, for women not reporting signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus
      disease (asymptomatic), 21 or more days after last possible exposure to Zika
      virus. RESULTS: Prolonged Zika virus RNA detection in serum was identified in
      four symptomatic pregnant women up to 46 days after symptom onset and in one
      asymptomatic pregnant woman 53 days postexposure. Among the five pregnancies, one
      pregnancy had evidence of fetal Zika virus infection confirmed by histopathologic
      examination of fetal tissue, three pregnancies resulted in live births of
      apparently healthy neonates with no reported abnormalities, and one pregnancy is 
      ongoing. CONCLUSION: Zika virus RNA was detected in the serum of five pregnant
      women beyond the previously estimated timeframe. Additional real-time RT-PCR
      testing of pregnant women might provide more data about prolonged detection of
      Zika virus RNA and the possible diagnostic, epidemiologic, and clinical
      implications for pregnant women.
FAU - Meaney-Delman, Dana
AU  - Meaney-Delman D
AD  - Office of the Director, the Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, and the Infectious
      Diseases Pathology Branch, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious
      Diseases, the Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic
      Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, the Epidemic Intelligence Service, the
      Division of Congenital and Developmental Disorders, National Center on Birth
      Defects and Developmental Disabilities, the National Center for Chronic Disease
      Prevention and Health Promotion, and the National Center for Immunization and
      Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta,
      Georgia; the Bureau of Communicable Disease Control, and the Laboratory of Viral 
      Diseases and the Viral Encephalitis Laboratory - Viral Diseases, Wadsworth
      Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, the Bureau of Communicable
      Disease, Division of Disease Control, and the Public Health Laboratory, New York 
      City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, and the New York State Department
      of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, and the Suffolk County Department of
      Health Services, Great River, New York; and the Bureau of Epidemiology and the
      Division of Disease Control and Health Protection, Florida Department of Health, 
      Tallahassee, Florida.
FAU - Oduyebo, Titilope
AU  - Oduyebo T
FAU - Polen, Kara N D
AU  - Polen KN
FAU - White, Jennifer L
AU  - White JL
FAU - Bingham, Andrea M
AU  - Bingham AM
FAU - Slavinski, Sally A
AU  - Slavinski SA
FAU - Heberlein-Larson, Lea
AU  - Heberlein-Larson L
FAU - St George, Kirsten
AU  - St George K
FAU - Rakeman, Jennifer L
AU  - Rakeman JL
FAU - Hills, Susan
AU  - Hills S
FAU - Olson, Christine K
AU  - Olson CK
FAU - Adamski, Alys
AU  - Adamski A
FAU - Culver Barlow, Lauren
AU  - Culver Barlow L
FAU - Lee, Ellen H
AU  - Lee EH
FAU - Likos, Anna M
AU  - Likos AM
FAU - Munoz, Jorge L
AU  - Munoz JL
FAU - Petersen, Emily E
AU  - Petersen EE
FAU - Dufort, Elizabeth M
AU  - Dufort EM
FAU - Dean, Amy B
AU  - Dean AB
FAU - Cortese, Margaret M
AU  - Cortese MM
FAU - Santiago, Gilberto A
AU  - Santiago GA
FAU - Bhatnagar, Julu
AU  - Bhatnagar J
FAU - Powers, Ann M
AU  - Powers AM
FAU - Zaki, Sherif
AU  - Zaki S
FAU - Petersen, Lyle R
AU  - Petersen LR
FAU - Jamieson, Denise J
AU  - Jamieson DJ
FAU - Honein, Margaret A
AU  - Honein MA
CN  - U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry Prolonged Viremia Working Group
LA  - ENG
PT  - JOURNAL ARTICLE
DEP - 20160729
TA  - Obstet Gynecol
JT  - Obstetrics and gynecology
JID - 0401101
EDAT- 2016/08/02 06:00
MHDA- 2016/08/02 06:00
CRDT- 2016/08/02 06:00
AID - 10.1097/AOG.0000000000001625 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Obstet Gynecol. 2016 Jul 29.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Meaney-Delman, Dana
AU  - Oduyebo, Titilope
AU  - Polen, Kara N. D.
AU  - White, Jennifer L.
AU  - Bingham, Andrea M.
AU  - Slavinski, Sally A.
AU  - Heberlein-Larson, Lea
AU  - St George, Kirsten
AU  - Rakeman, Jennifer L.
AU  - Hills, Susan
AU  - Olson, Christine K.
AU  - Adamski, Alys
AU  - Culver Barlow, Lauren
AU  - Lee, Ellen H.
AU  - Likos, Anna M.
AU  - Mu?oz, Jorge L.
AU  - Petersen, Emily E.
AU  - Dufort, Elizabeth M.
AU  - Dean, Amy B.
AU  - Cortese, Margaret M.
AU  - Santiago, Gilberto A.
AU  - Bhatnagar, Julu
AU  - Powers, Ann M.
AU  - Zaki, Sherif
AU  - Petersen, Lyle R.
AU  - Jamieson, Denise J.
AU  - Honein, Margaret A.
AU  - U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry Prolonged Viremia Working Group
PY  - 2016/Jul/29
TI  - Prolonged Detection of Zika Virus RNA in Pregnant Women.
T2  - Obstet Gynecol
JO  - Obstetrics and gynecology
N2  - Zika virus infection during pregnancy is a cause of microcephaly and other fetal brain abnormalities. Reports indicate that the duration of detectable viral RNA in serum after symptom onset is brief. In a recent case report involving a severely affected fetus, Zika virus RNA was detected in maternal serum 10 weeks after symptom onset, longer than the duration of RNA detection in serum previously reported. This report summarizes the clinical and laboratory characteristics of pregnant women with prolonged detection of Zika virus RNA in serum that were reported to the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry.
SN  - 1873-233X
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000001625
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27479770
ID  - Meaney-Delman2016
ER  - 
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