PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Travel-Associated Zika Virus Disease Cases Among U.S. Residents - United States, January 2015?February 2016.

Abstract Zika virus is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus. Recent outbreaks of Zika virus disease in the Pacific Islands and the Region of the Americas have identified new modes of transmission and clinical manifestations, including adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, data on the epidemiology and clinical findings of laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease remain limited. During January 1, 2015?February 26, 2016, a total of 116 residents of 33 U.S. states and the District of Columbia had laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection based on testing performed at CDC. Cases included one congenital infection and 115 persons who reported recent travel to areas with active Zika virus transmission (n = 110) or sexual contact with such a traveler (n = 5). All 115 patients had clinical illness, with the most common signs and symptoms being rash (98%; n = 113), fever (82%; 94), and arthralgia (66%; 76). Health care providers should educate patients, particularly pregnant women, about the risks for, and measures to prevent, infection with Zika virus and other mosquito-borne viruses. Zika virus disease should be considered in patients with acute onset of fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis, who traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission (http:// www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/index.html) or who had unprotected sex with a person who traveled to one of those areas and developed compatible symptoms within 2 weeks of returning.
PMID
Related Publications

Transmission of Zika Virus Through Sexual Contact with Travelers to Areas of Ongoing Transmission - Continental United States, 2016.

Interim Guidelines for Pregnant Women During a Zika Virus Outbreak--United States, 2016.

Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Infants and Children with Possible Zika Virus Infection--United States, February 2016.

Zika Virus Infection Among U.S. Pregnant Travelers - August 2015-February 2016.

Travel-Associated Zika Virus Disease Cases Among U.S. Residents--United States, January 2015-February 2016.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Disease Outbreaks

Travel

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start
%A Armstrong, Paige; Hennessey, Morgan; Adams, Monica; Cherry, Cara; Chiu, Sophia; Harrist, Alexia; Kwit, Natalie; Lewis, Lillianne; McGuire, Dana Olzenak; Oduyebo, Titilope; Russell, Kate; Talley, Pamela; Tanner, Mary; Williams, Charnetta
%A Zika Virus Response Epidemiology and Laboratory Team
%T Travel-Associated Zika Virus Disease Cases Among U.S. Residents - United States, January 2015?February 2016.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, vol. 65, no. 11, pp. 286-289
%D 00/2016
%V 65
%N 11
%M eng
%B Zika virus is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus. Recent outbreaks of Zika virus disease in the Pacific Islands and the Region of the Americas have identified new modes of transmission and clinical manifestations, including adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, data on the epidemiology and clinical findings of laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease remain limited. During January 1, 2015?February 26, 2016, a total of 116 residents of 33 U.S. states and the District of Columbia had laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection based on testing performed at CDC. Cases included one congenital infection and 115 persons who reported recent travel to areas with active Zika virus transmission (n = 110) or sexual contact with such a traveler (n = 5). All 115 patients had clinical illness, with the most common signs and symptoms being rash (98%; n = 113), fever (82%; 94), and arthralgia (66%; 76). Health care providers should educate patients, particularly pregnant women, about the risks for, and measures to prevent, infection with Zika virus and other mosquito-borne viruses. Zika virus disease should be considered in patients with acute onset of fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis, who traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission (http:// www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/index.html) or who had unprotected sex with a person who traveled to one of those areas and developed compatible symptoms within 2 weeks of returning.
%K Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Child, Child, Preschool, Disease Outbreaks, Female, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Middle Aged, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Travel, United States, Young Adult, Zika Virus, Zika Virus Infection
%P 286
%L 289
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2016.......65..286A

@Article{Armstrong2016,
author="Armstrong, Paige
and Hennessey, Morgan
and Adams, Monica
and Cherry, Cara
and Chiu, Sophia
and Harrist, Alexia
and Kwit, Natalie
and Lewis, Lillianne
and McGuire, Dana Olzenak
and Oduyebo, Titilope
and Russell, Kate
and Talley, Pamela
and Tanner, Mary
and Williams, Charnetta
and {Zika Virus Response Epidemiology and Laboratory Team}",
title="Travel-Associated Zika Virus Disease Cases Among U.S. Residents - United States, January 2015--February 2016.",
journal="MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report",
year="2016",
volume="65",
number="11",
pages="286--289",
keywords="Adolescent",
keywords="Adult",
keywords="Aged",
keywords="Aged, 80 and over",
keywords="Child",
keywords="Child, Preschool",
keywords="Disease Outbreaks",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Infant",
keywords="Infant, Newborn",
keywords="Male",
keywords="Middle Aged",
keywords="Pregnancy",
keywords="Pregnancy Complications, Infectious",
keywords="Travel",
keywords="United States",
keywords="Young Adult",
keywords="Zika Virus",
keywords="Zika Virus Infection",
abstract="Zika virus is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus. Recent outbreaks of Zika virus disease in the Pacific Islands and the Region of the Americas have identified new modes of transmission and clinical manifestations, including adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, data on the epidemiology and clinical findings of laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease remain limited. During January 1, 2015--February 26, 2016, a total of 116 residents of 33 U.S. states and the District of Columbia had laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection based on testing performed at CDC. Cases included one congenital infection and 115 persons who reported recent travel to areas with active Zika virus transmission (n = 110) or sexual contact with such a traveler (n = 5). All 115 patients had clinical illness, with the most common signs and symptoms being rash (98\%; n = 113), fever (82\%; 94), and arthralgia (66\%; 76). Health care providers should educate patients, particularly pregnant women, about the risks for, and measures to prevent, infection with Zika virus and other mosquito-borne viruses. Zika virus disease should be considered in patients with acute onset of fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis, who traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission (http:// www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/index.html) or who had unprotected sex with a person who traveled to one of those areas and developed compatible symptoms within 2 weeks of returning.",
issn="1545-861X",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27459754",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Travel-Associated Zika Virus Disease Cases Among U.S. Residents - United States, January 2015?February 2016.
%A Armstrong, Paige
%A Hennessey, Morgan
%A Adams, Monica
%A Cherry, Cara
%A Chiu, Sophia
%A Harrist, Alexia
%A Kwit, Natalie
%A Lewis, Lillianne
%A McGuire, Dana Olzenak
%A Oduyebo, Titilope
%A Russell, Kate
%A Talley, Pamela
%A Tanner, Mary
%A Williams, Charnetta
%A Zika Virus Response Epidemiology and Laboratory Team
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
%D 2016
%V 65
%N 11
%@ 1545-861X
%G eng
%F Armstrong2016
%X Zika virus is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus. Recent outbreaks of Zika virus disease in the Pacific Islands and the Region of the Americas have identified new modes of transmission and clinical manifestations, including adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, data on the epidemiology and clinical findings of laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease remain limited. During January 1, 2015?February 26, 2016, a total of 116 residents of 33 U.S. states and the District of Columbia had laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection based on testing performed at CDC. Cases included one congenital infection and 115 persons who reported recent travel to areas with active Zika virus transmission (n = 110) or sexual contact with such a traveler (n = 5). All 115 patients had clinical illness, with the most common signs and symptoms being rash (98%; n = 113), fever (82%; 94), and arthralgia (66%; 76). Health care providers should educate patients, particularly pregnant women, about the risks for, and measures to prevent, infection with Zika virus and other mosquito-borne viruses. Zika virus disease should be considered in patients with acute onset of fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis, who traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission (http:// www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/index.html) or who had unprotected sex with a person who traveled to one of those areas and developed compatible symptoms within 2 weeks of returning.
%K Adolescent
%K Adult
%K Aged
%K Aged, 80 and over
%K Child
%K Child, Preschool
%K Disease Outbreaks
%K Female
%K Humans
%K Infant
%K Infant, Newborn
%K Male
%K Middle Aged
%K Pregnancy
%K Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
%K Travel
%K United States
%K Young Adult
%K Zika Virus
%K Zika Virus Infection
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27459754
%P 286-289

PT Journal
AU Armstrong, P
   Hennessey, M
   Adams, M
   Cherry, C
   Chiu, S
   Harrist, A
   Kwit, N
   Lewis, L
   McGuire, DO
   Oduyebo, T
   Russell, K
   Talley, P
   Tanner, M
   Williams, C
AU Zika Virus Response Epidemiology and Laboratory Team
TI Travel-Associated Zika Virus Disease Cases Among U.S. Residents - United States, January 2015?February 2016.
SO MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JI MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
PY 2016
BP 286
EP 289
VL 65
IS 11
LA eng
DE Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Child; Child, Preschool; Disease Outbreaks; Female; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Male; Middle Aged; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications, Infectious; Travel; United States; Young Adult; Zika Virus; Zika Virus Infection
AB Zika virus is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus. Recent outbreaks of Zika virus disease in the Pacific Islands and the Region of the Americas have identified new modes of transmission and clinical manifestations, including adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, data on the epidemiology and clinical findings of laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease remain limited. During January 1, 2015?February 26, 2016, a total of 116 residents of 33 U.S. states and the District of Columbia had laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection based on testing performed at CDC. Cases included one congenital infection and 115 persons who reported recent travel to areas with active Zika virus transmission (n = 110) or sexual contact with such a traveler (n = 5). All 115 patients had clinical illness, with the most common signs and symptoms being rash (98%; n = 113), fever (82%; 94), and arthralgia (66%; 76). Health care providers should educate patients, particularly pregnant women, about the risks for, and measures to prevent, infection with Zika virus and other mosquito-borne viruses. Zika virus disease should be considered in patients with acute onset of fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis, who traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission (http:// www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/index.html) or who had unprotected sex with a person who traveled to one of those areas and developed compatible symptoms within 2 weeks of returning.
ER

PMID- 27459754
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20160726
DCOM- 20160729
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 65
IP  - 11
DP  - 2016
TI  - Travel-Associated Zika Virus Disease Cases Among U.S. Residents - United States, 
      January 2015-February 2016.
PG  - 286-9
AB  - Zika virus is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus. Recent outbreaks of Zika
      virus disease in the Pacific Islands and the Region of the Americas have
      identified new modes of transmission and clinical manifestations, including
      adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, data on the epidemiology and clinical
      findings of laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease remain limited. During
      January 1, 2015-February 26, 2016, a total of 116 residents of 33 U.S. states and
      the District of Columbia had laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection
      based on testing performed at CDC. Cases included one congenital infection and
      115 persons who reported recent travel to areas with active Zika virus
      transmission (n = 110) or sexual contact with such a traveler (n = 5). All 115
      patients had clinical illness, with the most common signs and symptoms being rash
      (98%; n = 113), fever (82%; 94), and arthralgia (66%; 76). Health care providers 
      should educate patients, particularly pregnant women, about the risks for, and
      measures to prevent, infection with Zika virus and other mosquito-borne viruses. 
      Zika virus disease should be considered in patients with acute onset of fever,
      rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis, who traveled to areas with ongoing Zika
      virus transmission (http:// www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/index.html) or who had
      unprotected sex with a person who traveled to one of those areas and developed
      compatible symptoms within 2 weeks of returning.
FAU - Armstrong, Paige
AU  - Armstrong P
FAU - Hennessey, Morgan
AU  - Hennessey M
FAU - Adams, Monica
AU  - Adams M
FAU - Cherry, Cara
AU  - Cherry C
FAU - Chiu, Sophia
AU  - Chiu S
FAU - Harrist, Alexia
AU  - Harrist A
FAU - Kwit, Natalie
AU  - Kwit N
FAU - Lewis, Lillianne
AU  - Lewis L
FAU - McGuire, Dana Olzenak
AU  - McGuire DO
FAU - Oduyebo, Titilope
AU  - Oduyebo T
FAU - Russell, Kate
AU  - Russell K
FAU - Talley, Pamela
AU  - Talley P
FAU - Tanner, Mary
AU  - Tanner M
FAU - Williams, Charnetta
AU  - Williams C
CN  - Zika Virus Response Epidemiology and Laboratory Team
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Child
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - *Disease Outbreaks
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant
MH  - Infant, Newborn
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis
MH  - *Travel
MH  - United States/epidemiology
MH  - Young Adult
MH  - Zika Virus/*isolation & purification
MH  - Zika Virus Infection/*diagnosis/epidemiology
IR  - Basile J
FIR - Basile, Jane
IR  - Brandvold J
FIR - Brandvold, Jacob
IR  - Calvert A
FIR - Calvert, Amanda
IR  - Cohn A
FIR - Cohn, Amanda
IR  - Fischer M
FIR - Fischer, Marc
IR  - Goldman-Israelow B
FIR - Goldman-Israelow, Benjamin
IR  - Goodenough D
FIR - Goodenough, Dana
IR  - Goodman C
FIR - Goodman, Christin
IR  - Hills S
FIR - Hills, Susan
IR  - Kosoy O
FIR - Kosoy, Olga
IR  - Lambert A
FIR - Lambert, Amy
IR  - Lanciotti R
FIR - Lanciotti, Robert
IR  - Laven J
FIR - Laven, Janeen
IR  - Ledermann J
FIR - Ledermann, Jeremy
IR  - Lehman J
FIR - Lehman, Jennifer
IR  - Lindsey N
FIR - Lindsey, Nicole
IR  - Mead P
FIR - Mead, Paul
IR  - Mossel E
FIR - Mossel, Eric
IR  - Nelson C
FIR - Nelson, Christina
IR  - Nichols M
FIR - Nichols, Megin
IR  - O'Leary D
FIR - O'Leary, Daniel
IR  - Panella A
FIR - Panella, Amanda
IR  - Powers A
FIR - Powers, Ann
IR  - Rabe I
FIR - Rabe, Ingrid
IR  - Reagan-Steiner S
FIR - Reagan-Steiner, Sarah
IR  - Staples J
FIR - Staples, J Erin
IR  - Velez J
FIR - Velez, Jason
EDAT- 2016/07/28 06:00
MHDA- 2016/07/30 06:00
CRDT- 2016/07/28 06:00
PST - ppublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016;65(11):286-9.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Armstrong, Paige
AU  - Hennessey, Morgan
AU  - Adams, Monica
AU  - Cherry, Cara
AU  - Chiu, Sophia
AU  - Harrist, Alexia
AU  - Kwit, Natalie
AU  - Lewis, Lillianne
AU  - McGuire, Dana Olzenak
AU  - Oduyebo, Titilope
AU  - Russell, Kate
AU  - Talley, Pamela
AU  - Tanner, Mary
AU  - Williams, Charnetta
AU  - Zika Virus Response Epidemiology and Laboratory Team
PY  - 2016//
TI  - Travel-Associated Zika Virus Disease Cases Among U.S. Residents - United States, January 2015?February 2016.
T2  - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
JO  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
SP  - 286
EP  - 289
VL  - 65
IS  - 11
KW  - Adolescent
KW  - Adult
KW  - Aged
KW  - Aged, 80 and over
KW  - Child
KW  - Child, Preschool
KW  - Disease Outbreaks
KW  - Female
KW  - Humans
KW  - Infant
KW  - Infant, Newborn
KW  - Male
KW  - Middle Aged
KW  - Pregnancy
KW  - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
KW  - Travel
KW  - United States
KW  - Young Adult
KW  - Zika Virus
KW  - Zika Virus Infection
N2  - Zika virus is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus. Recent outbreaks of Zika virus disease in the Pacific Islands and the Region of the Americas have identified new modes of transmission and clinical manifestations, including adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, data on the epidemiology and clinical findings of laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease remain limited. During January 1, 2015?February 26, 2016, a total of 116 residents of 33 U.S. states and the District of Columbia had laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection based on testing performed at CDC. Cases included one congenital infection and 115 persons who reported recent travel to areas with active Zika virus transmission (n = 110) or sexual contact with such a traveler (n = 5). All 115 patients had clinical illness, with the most common signs and symptoms being rash (98%; n = 113), fever (82%; 94), and arthralgia (66%; 76). Health care providers should educate patients, particularly pregnant women, about the risks for, and measures to prevent, infection with Zika virus and other mosquito-borne viruses. Zika virus disease should be considered in patients with acute onset of fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis, who traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission (http:// www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/index.html) or who had unprotected sex with a person who traveled to one of those areas and developed compatible symptoms within 2 weeks of returning.
SN  - 1545-861X
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27459754
ID  - Armstrong2016
ER  - 
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<b:Sources SelectedStyle="" xmlns:b="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography"  xmlns="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography" >
<b:Source>
<b:Tag>Armstrong2016</b:Tag>
<b:SourceType>ArticleInAPeriodical</b:SourceType>
<b:Year>2016</b:Year>
<b:PeriodicalName>MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report</b:PeriodicalName>
<b:Volume>65</b:Volume>
<b:Issue>11</b:Issue>
<b:Pages>286-289</b:Pages>
<b:Author>
<b:Author><b:NameList>
<b:Person><b:Last>Armstrong</b:Last><b:First>Paige</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Hennessey</b:Last><b:First>Morgan</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Adams</b:Last><b:First>Monica</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Cherry</b:Last><b:First>Cara</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Chiu</b:Last><b:First>Sophia</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Harrist</b:Last><b:First>Alexia</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Kwit</b:Last><b:First>Natalie</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Lewis</b:Last><b:First>Lillianne</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>McGuire</b:Last><b:First>Dana</b:First><b:Middle>Olzenak</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Oduyebo</b:Last><b:First>Titilope</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Russell</b:Last><b:First>Kate</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Talley</b:Last><b:First>Pamela</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Tanner</b:Last><b:First>Mary</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Williams</b:Last><b:First>Charnetta</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Zika Virus Response Epidemiology and Laboratory Team</b:Last></b:Person>
</b:NameList></b:Author>
</b:Author>
<b:Title>Travel-Associated Zika Virus Disease Cases Among U.S. Residents - United States, January 2015&#8211;February 2016.</b:Title>
 <b:ShortTitle>MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.</b:ShortTitle>
<b:Comments>Zika virus is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus. Recent outbreaks of Zika virus disease in the Pacific Islands and the Region of the Americas have identified new modes of transmission and clinical manifestations, including adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, data on the epidemiology and clinical findings of laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease remain limited. During January 1, 2015&#8211;February 26, 2016, a total of 116 residents of 33 U.S. states and the District of Columbia had laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection based on testing performed at CDC. Cases included one congenital infection and 115 persons who reported recent travel to areas with active Zika virus transmission (n = 110) or sexual contact with such a traveler (n = 5). All 115 patients had clinical illness, with the most common signs and symptoms being rash (98%; n = 113), fever (82%; 94), and arthralgia (66%; 76). Health care providers should educate patients, particularly pregnant women, about the risks for, and measures to prevent, infection with Zika virus and other mosquito-borne viruses. Zika virus disease should be considered in patients with acute onset of fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis, who traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission (http:// www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/index.html) or who had unprotected sex with a person who traveled to one of those areas and developed compatible symptoms within 2 weeks of returning.</b:Comments>
</b:Source>
</b:Sources>