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Human Rabies - Wyoming and Utah, 2015.

Abstract In September 2015, a Wyoming woman was admitted to a local hospital with a 5-day history of progressive weakness, ataxia, dysarthria, and dysphagia. Because of respiratory failure, she was transferred to a referral hospital in Utah, where she developed progressive encephalitis. On day 8 of hospitalization, the patient's family told clinicians they recalled that, 1 month before admission, the woman had found a bat on her neck upon waking, but had not sought medical care. The patient's husband subsequently had contacted county invasive species authorities about the incident, but he was not advised to seek health care for evaluation of his wife's risk for rabies. On October 2, CDC confirmed the patient was infected with a rabies virus variant that was enzootic to the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The patient died on October 3. Public understanding of rabies risk from bat contact needs to be improved; cooperation among public health and other agencies can aid in referring persons with possible bat exposure for assessment of rabies risk.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start
%A Harrist, Alexia; Styczynski, Ashley; Wynn, DonRaphael; Ansari, Safdar; Hopkin, Justin; Rosado-Santos, Harry; Baker, JoDee; Nakashima, Allyn; Atkinson, Annette; Spencer, Melanie; Dean, Debbie; Teachout, Leslie; Mayer, Jeanmarie; Condori, Rene E.; Orciari, Lillian; Wadhwa, Ashutosh; Ellison, James; Niezgoda, Michael; Petersen, Brett; Wallace, Ryan; Musgrave, Karl
%T Human Rabies - Wyoming and Utah, 2015.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, vol. 65, no. 21, pp. 529-533
%D 06/2016
%V 65
%N 21
%M eng
%B In September 2015, a Wyoming woman was admitted to a local hospital with a 5-day history of progressive weakness, ataxia, dysarthria, and dysphagia. Because of respiratory failure, she was transferred to a referral hospital in Utah, where she developed progressive encephalitis. On day 8 of hospitalization, the patient's family told clinicians they recalled that, 1 month before admission, the woman had found a bat on her neck upon waking, but had not sought medical care. The patient's husband subsequently had contacted county invasive species authorities about the incident, but he was not advised to seek health care for evaluation of his wife's risk for rabies. On October 2, CDC confirmed the patient was infected with a rabies virus variant that was enzootic to the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The patient died on October 3. Public understanding of rabies risk from bat contact needs to be improved; cooperation among public health and other agencies can aid in referring persons with possible bat exposure for assessment of rabies risk.
%P 529
%L 533
%Y 10.15585/mmwr.mm6521a1
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2016.......65..529H

@Article{Harrist2016,
author="Harrist, Alexia
and Styczynski, Ashley
and Wynn, DonRaphael
and Ansari, Safdar
and Hopkin, Justin
and Rosado-Santos, Harry
and Baker, JoDee
and Nakashima, Allyn
and Atkinson, Annette
and Spencer, Melanie
and Dean, Debbie
and Teachout, Leslie
and Mayer, Jeanmarie
and Condori, Rene E.
and Orciari, Lillian
and Wadhwa, Ashutosh
and Ellison, James
and Niezgoda, Michael
and Petersen, Brett
and Wallace, Ryan
and Musgrave, Karl",
title="Human Rabies - Wyoming and Utah, 2015.",
journal="MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report",
year="2016",
month="Jun",
day="03",
volume="65",
number="21",
pages="529--533",
abstract="In September 2015, a Wyoming woman was admitted to a local hospital with a 5-day history of progressive weakness, ataxia, dysarthria, and dysphagia. Because of respiratory failure, she was transferred to a referral hospital in Utah, where she developed progressive encephalitis. On day 8 of hospitalization, the patient's family told clinicians they recalled that, 1 month before admission, the woman had found a bat on her neck upon waking, but had not sought medical care. The patient's husband subsequently had contacted county invasive species authorities about the incident, but he was not advised to seek health care for evaluation of his wife's risk for rabies. On October 2, CDC confirmed the patient was infected with a rabies virus variant that was enzootic to the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The patient died on October 3. Public understanding of rabies risk from bat contact needs to be improved; cooperation among public health and other agencies can aid in referring persons with possible bat exposure for assessment of rabies risk.",
issn="1545-861X",
doi="10.15585/mmwr.mm6521a1",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27253630",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Human Rabies - Wyoming and Utah, 2015.
%A Harrist, Alexia
%A Styczynski, Ashley
%A Wynn, DonRaphael
%A Ansari, Safdar
%A Hopkin, Justin
%A Rosado-Santos, Harry
%A Baker, JoDee
%A Nakashima, Allyn
%A Atkinson, Annette
%A Spencer, Melanie
%A Dean, Debbie
%A Teachout, Leslie
%A Mayer, Jeanmarie
%A Condori, Rene E.
%A Orciari, Lillian
%A Wadhwa, Ashutosh
%A Ellison, James
%A Niezgoda, Michael
%A Petersen, Brett
%A Wallace, Ryan
%A Musgrave, Karl
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
%D 2016
%8 June 03
%V 65
%N 21
%@ 1545-861X
%G eng
%F Harrist2016
%X In September 2015, a Wyoming woman was admitted to a local hospital with a 5-day history of progressive weakness, ataxia, dysarthria, and dysphagia. Because of respiratory failure, she was transferred to a referral hospital in Utah, where she developed progressive encephalitis. On day 8 of hospitalization, the patient's family told clinicians they recalled that, 1 month before admission, the woman had found a bat on her neck upon waking, but had not sought medical care. The patient's husband subsequently had contacted county invasive species authorities about the incident, but he was not advised to seek health care for evaluation of his wife's risk for rabies. On October 2, CDC confirmed the patient was infected with a rabies virus variant that was enzootic to the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The patient died on October 3. Public understanding of rabies risk from bat contact needs to be improved; cooperation among public health and other agencies can aid in referring persons with possible bat exposure for assessment of rabies risk.
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6521a1
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27253630
%P 529-533

PT Journal
AU Harrist, A
   Styczynski, A
   Wynn, D
   Ansari, S
   Hopkin, J
   Rosado-Santos, H
   Baker, J
   Nakashima, A
   Atkinson, A
   Spencer, M
   Dean, D
   Teachout, L
   Mayer, J
   Condori, RE
   Orciari, L
   Wadhwa, A
   Ellison, J
   Niezgoda, M
   Petersen, B
   Wallace, R
   Musgrave, K
TI Human Rabies - Wyoming and Utah, 2015.
SO MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JI MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
PD 06
PY 2016
BP 529
EP 533
VL 65
IS 21
DI 10.15585/mmwr.mm6521a1
LA eng
AB In September 2015, a Wyoming woman was admitted to a local hospital with a 5-day history of progressive weakness, ataxia, dysarthria, and dysphagia. Because of respiratory failure, she was transferred to a referral hospital in Utah, where she developed progressive encephalitis. On day 8 of hospitalization, the patient's family told clinicians they recalled that, 1 month before admission, the woman had found a bat on her neck upon waking, but had not sought medical care. The patient's husband subsequently had contacted county invasive species authorities about the incident, but he was not advised to seek health care for evaluation of his wife's risk for rabies. On October 2, CDC confirmed the patient was infected with a rabies virus variant that was enzootic to the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The patient died on October 3. Public understanding of rabies risk from bat contact needs to be improved; cooperation among public health and other agencies can aid in referring persons with possible bat exposure for assessment of rabies risk.
ER

PMID- 27253630
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
DA  - 20160603
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 65
IP  - 21
DP  - 2016
TI  - Human Rabies - Wyoming and Utah, 2015.
PG  - 529-33
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6521a1 [doi]
AB  - In September 2015, a Wyoming woman was admitted to a local hospital with a 5-day 
      history of progressive weakness, ataxia, dysarthria, and dysphagia. Because of
      respiratory failure, she was transferred to a referral hospital in Utah, where
      she developed progressive encephalitis. On day 8 of hospitalization, the
      patient's family told clinicians they recalled that, 1 month before admission,
      the woman had found a bat on her neck upon waking, but had not sought medical
      care. The patient's husband subsequently had contacted county invasive species
      authorities about the incident, but he was not advised to seek health care for
      evaluation of his wife's risk for rabies. On October 2, CDC confirmed the patient
      was infected with a rabies virus variant that was enzootic to the silver-haired
      bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The patient died on October 3. Public
      understanding of rabies risk from bat contact needs to be improved; cooperation
      among public health and other agencies can aid in referring persons with possible
      bat exposure for assessment of rabies risk.
FAU - Harrist, Alexia
AU  - Harrist A
FAU - Styczynski, Ashley
AU  - Styczynski A
FAU - Wynn, DonRaphael
AU  - Wynn D
FAU - Ansari, Safdar
AU  - Ansari S
FAU - Hopkin, Justin
AU  - Hopkin J
FAU - Rosado-Santos, Harry
AU  - Rosado-Santos H
FAU - Baker, JoDee
AU  - Baker J
FAU - Nakashima, Allyn
AU  - Nakashima A
FAU - Atkinson, Annette
AU  - Atkinson A
FAU - Spencer, Melanie
AU  - Spencer M
FAU - Dean, Debbie
AU  - Dean D
FAU - Teachout, Leslie
AU  - Teachout L
FAU - Mayer, Jeanmarie
AU  - Mayer J
FAU - Condori, Rene E
AU  - Condori RE
FAU - Orciari, Lillian
AU  - Orciari L
FAU - Wadhwa, Ashutosh
AU  - Wadhwa A
FAU - Ellison, James
AU  - Ellison J
FAU - Niezgoda, Michael
AU  - Niezgoda M
FAU - Petersen, Brett
AU  - Petersen B
FAU - Wallace, Ryan
AU  - Wallace R
FAU - Musgrave, Karl
AU  - Musgrave K
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160603
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
EDAT- 2016/06/03 06:00
MHDA- 2016/06/03 06:00
CRDT- 2016/06/03 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6521a1 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016 Jun 3;65(21):529-33. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6521a1.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Harrist, Alexia
AU  - Styczynski, Ashley
AU  - Wynn, DonRaphael
AU  - Ansari, Safdar
AU  - Hopkin, Justin
AU  - Rosado-Santos, Harry
AU  - Baker, JoDee
AU  - Nakashima, Allyn
AU  - Atkinson, Annette
AU  - Spencer, Melanie
AU  - Dean, Debbie
AU  - Teachout, Leslie
AU  - Mayer, Jeanmarie
AU  - Condori, Rene E.
AU  - Orciari, Lillian
AU  - Wadhwa, Ashutosh
AU  - Ellison, James
AU  - Niezgoda, Michael
AU  - Petersen, Brett
AU  - Wallace, Ryan
AU  - Musgrave, Karl
PY  - 2016/06/03
TI  - Human Rabies - Wyoming and Utah, 2015.
T2  - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
JO  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
SP  - 529
EP  - 533
VL  - 65
IS  - 21
N2  - In September 2015, a Wyoming woman was admitted to a local hospital with a 5-day history of progressive weakness, ataxia, dysarthria, and dysphagia. Because of respiratory failure, she was transferred to a referral hospital in Utah, where she developed progressive encephalitis. On day 8 of hospitalization, the patient's family told clinicians they recalled that, 1 month before admission, the woman had found a bat on her neck upon waking, but had not sought medical care. The patient's husband subsequently had contacted county invasive species authorities about the incident, but he was not advised to seek health care for evaluation of his wife's risk for rabies. On October 2, CDC confirmed the patient was infected with a rabies virus variant that was enzootic to the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The patient died on October 3. Public understanding of rabies risk from bat contact needs to be improved; cooperation among public health and other agencies can aid in referring persons with possible bat exposure for assessment of rabies risk.
SN  - 1545-861X
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6521a1
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27253630
ID  - Harrist2016
ER  - 
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