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Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women - United States and Territories, May 2016.

Abstract Zika virus is a cause of microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1), and it is the first known mosquito-borne infection to cause congenital anomalies in humans. The establishment of a comprehensive surveillance system to monitor pregnant women with Zika virus infection will provide data to further elucidate the full range of potential outcomes for fetuses and infants of mothers with asymptomatic and symptomatic Zika virus infection during pregnancy. In February 2016, Zika virus disease and congenital Zika virus infections became nationally notifiable conditions in the United States (2). Cases in pregnant women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection who have either 1) symptomatic infection or 2) asymptomatic infection with diagnosed complications of pregnancy can be reported as cases of Zika virus disease to ArboNET* (2), CDC's national arboviral diseases surveillance system. Under existing interim guidelines from the Council for State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), asymptomatic Zika virus infections in pregnant women who do not have known pregnancy complications are not reportable. ArboNET does not currently include pregnancy surveillance information (e.g., gestational age or pregnancy exposures) or pregnancy outcomes. To understand the full impact of infection on the fetus and neonate, other systems are needed for reporting and active monitoring of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Thus, in collaboration with state, local, tribal, and territorial health departments, CDC established two surveillance systems to monitor pregnancies and congenital outcomes among women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection(?) in the United States and territories: 1) the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR),(?) which monitors pregnant women residing in U.S. states and all U.S. territories except Puerto Rico, and 2) the Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System (ZAPSS), which monitors pregnant women residing in Puerto Rico. As of May 12, 2016, the surveillance systems were monitoring 157 and 122 pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection from participating U.S. states and territories, respectively. Tracking and monitoring clinical presentation of Zika virus infection, all prenatal testing, and adverse consequences of Zika virus infection during pregnancy are critical to better characterize the risk for congenital infection, the performance of prenatal diagnostic testing, and the spectrum of adverse congenital outcomes. These data will improve clinical guidance, inform counseling messages for pregnant women, and facilitate planning for clinical and public health services for affected families.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start
%A Simeone, Regina M.; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K.; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Petersen, Emily E.; Galang, Romeo R.; Oduyebo, Titilope; Rivera-Garcia, Brenda; Valencia-Prado, Miguel; Newsome, Kimberly B.; P?rez-Padilla, Janice; Williams, Tonya R.; Biggerstaff, Matthew; Jamieson, Denise J.; Honein, Margaret A.; Ahmed, Farah; Anesi, Scott; Arnold, Kathryn E.; Barradas, Danielle; Barter, Devra; Bertolli, Jeanne; Bingham, Andrea M.; Bollock, Jan; Bosse, Trish; Bradley, Kristy K.; Brady, Diane; Brown, Catherine M.; Bryan, Katie; Buchanan, Victoria; Bullard, Ponce D.; Carrigan, Alice; Clouse, Monica; Cook, Sally; Cooper, Michael; Davidson, Sherri; DeBarr, Ariana; Dobbs, Thomas; Dunams, Tambra; Eason, Jeffrey; Eckert, Amanda; Eggers, Paula; Ellington, Sascha R.; Feldpausch, Amanda; Fredette, Carolyn R.; Gabel, Julie; Glover, Maleeka; Gosciminski, Michael; Gay, Margarita; Haddock, Robert; Hand, Sheryl; Hardy, Jessica; Hartel, Marie E. Bottomley; Hennenfent, Andrew K.; Hills, Susan L.; House, Jennifer; Igbinosa, Iro; Im, Lucy; Jeff, Hamik; Khan, Sumaiya; Kightlinger, Lon; Ko, Jean Y.; Koirala, Samir; Korhonen, Lauren; Krishnasamy, Vikram; Kurkjian, Katie; Lampe, Margaret; Larson, Sandra; Lee, Ellen H.; Lind, Leah; Lindquist, Scott; Long, Jonah; Macdonald, Jennifer; MacFarquhar, Jennifer; Mackie, Daniel P.; Mark-Carew, Miguella; Martin, Brennan; Martinez-Qui?ones, Alma; Matthews-Greer, Janice; McGee, Sasha A.; McLaughlin, Joe; Mock, Valerie; Muna, Esther; Oltean, Hanna; O'Mallan, Josephine; Pagano, H. Pamela; Park, Sarah Y.; Peterson, Dallin; Polen, Kara N. D.; Porse, Charsey Cole; Rao, Carol Y.; Ropri, Abubakar; Rinsky, Jessica; Robinson, Sara; Rosinger, Asher Y.; Ruberto, Irene; Schiffman, Elizabeth; Scott-Waldron, Christine; Semple, Shereen; Sharp, Tyler; Short, Kirstin; Signs, Kimberly; Slavinski, Sally A.; Stevens, Taryn; Sweatlock, Joseph; Talbot, Elizabeth A.; Tonzel, Julius; Traxler, Rita; Tubach, Sheri; Van Houten, Clayton; VinHatton, Elizabeth; Viray, Melissa; Virginie, Daguise; Warren, Michael D.; Waters, Catherine; White, Paul; Williams, Tanya; Winters, Ann I.; Wood, Shelley; Zaganjor, Ibrahim
%A Zika and Pregnancy Working Group
%T Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women - United States and Territories, May 2016.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, vol. 65, no. 20, pp. 514-519
%D 05/2016
%V 65
%N 20
%M eng
%B Zika virus is a cause of microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1), and it is the first known mosquito-borne infection to cause congenital anomalies in humans. The establishment of a comprehensive surveillance system to monitor pregnant women with Zika virus infection will provide data to further elucidate the full range of potential outcomes for fetuses and infants of mothers with asymptomatic and symptomatic Zika virus infection during pregnancy. In February 2016, Zika virus disease and congenital Zika virus infections became nationally notifiable conditions in the United States (2). Cases in pregnant women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection who have either 1) symptomatic infection or 2) asymptomatic infection with diagnosed complications of pregnancy can be reported as cases of Zika virus disease to ArboNET* (2), CDC's national arboviral diseases surveillance system. Under existing interim guidelines from the Council for State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), asymptomatic Zika virus infections in pregnant women who do not have known pregnancy complications are not reportable. ArboNET does not currently include pregnancy surveillance information (e.g., gestational age or pregnancy exposures) or pregnancy outcomes. To understand the full impact of infection on the fetus and neonate, other systems are needed for reporting and active monitoring of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Thus, in collaboration with state, local, tribal, and territorial health departments, CDC established two surveillance systems to monitor pregnancies and congenital outcomes among women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection(?) in the United States and territories: 1) the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR),(?) which monitors pregnant women residing in U.S. states and all U.S. territories except Puerto Rico, and 2) the Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System (ZAPSS), which monitors pregnant women residing in Puerto Rico. As of May 12, 2016, the surveillance systems were monitoring 157 and 122 pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection from participating U.S. states and territories, respectively. Tracking and monitoring clinical presentation of Zika virus infection, all prenatal testing, and adverse consequences of Zika virus infection during pregnancy are critical to better characterize the risk for congenital infection, the performance of prenatal diagnostic testing, and the spectrum of adverse congenital outcomes. These data will improve clinical guidance, inform counseling messages for pregnant women, and facilitate planning for clinical and public health services for affected families.
%P 514
%L 519
%Y 10.15585/mmwr.mm6520e1
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2016.......65..514S

@Article{Simeone2016,
author="Simeone, Regina M.
and Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K.
and Meaney-Delman, Dana
and Petersen, Emily E.
and Galang, Romeo R.
and Oduyebo, Titilope
and Rivera-Garcia, Brenda
and Valencia-Prado, Miguel
and Newsome, Kimberly B.
and P{\'e}rez-Padilla, Janice
and Williams, Tonya R.
and Biggerstaff, Matthew
and Jamieson, Denise J.
and Honein, Margaret A.
and {Zika and Pregnancy Working Group}
and Ahmed, Farah
and Anesi, Scott
and Arnold, Kathryn E.
and Barradas, Danielle
and Barter, Devra
and Bertolli, Jeanne
and Bingham, Andrea M.
and Bollock, Jan
and Bosse, Trish
and Bradley, Kristy K.
and Brady, Diane
and Brown, Catherine M.
and Bryan, Katie
and Buchanan, Victoria
and Bullard, Ponce D.
and Carrigan, Alice
and Clouse, Monica
and Cook, Sally
and Cooper, Michael
and Davidson, Sherri
and DeBarr, Ariana
and Dobbs, Thomas
and Dunams, Tambra
and Eason, Jeffrey
and Eckert, Amanda
and Eggers, Paula
and Ellington, Sascha R.
and Feldpausch, Amanda
and Fredette, Carolyn R.
and Gabel, Julie
and Glover, Maleeka
and Gosciminski, Michael
and Gay, Margarita
and Haddock, Robert
and Hand, Sheryl
and Hardy, Jessica
and Hartel, Marie E. Bottomley
and Hennenfent, Andrew K.
and Hills, Susan L.
and House, Jennifer
and Igbinosa, Iro
and Im, Lucy
and Jeff, Hamik
and Khan, Sumaiya
and Kightlinger, Lon
and Ko, Jean Y.
and Koirala, Samir
and Korhonen, Lauren
and Krishnasamy, Vikram
and Kurkjian, Katie
and Lampe, Margaret
and Larson, Sandra
and Lee, Ellen H.
and Lind, Leah
and Lindquist, Scott
and Long, Jonah
and Macdonald, Jennifer
and MacFarquhar, Jennifer
and Mackie, Daniel P.
and Mark-Carew, Miguella
and Martin, Brennan
and Martinez-Qui{\~n}ones, Alma
and Matthews-Greer, Janice
and McGee, Sasha A.
and McLaughlin, Joe
and Mock, Valerie
and Muna, Esther
and Oltean, Hanna
and O'Mallan, Josephine
and Pagano, H. Pamela
and Park, Sarah Y.
and Peterson, Dallin
and Polen, Kara N. D.
and Porse, Charsey Cole
and Rao, Carol Y.
and Ropri, Abubakar
and Rinsky, Jessica
and Robinson, Sara
and Rosinger, Asher Y.
and Ruberto, Irene
and Schiffman, Elizabeth
and Scott-Waldron, Christine
and Semple, Shereen
and Sharp, Tyler
and Short, Kirstin
and Signs, Kimberly
and Slavinski, Sally A.
and Stevens, Taryn
and Sweatlock, Joseph
and Talbot, Elizabeth A.
and Tonzel, Julius
and Traxler, Rita
and Tubach, Sheri
and Van Houten, Clayton
and VinHatton, Elizabeth
and Viray, Melissa
and Virginie, Daguise
and Warren, Michael D.
and Waters, Catherine
and White, Paul
and Williams, Tanya
and Winters, Ann I.
and Wood, Shelley
and Zaganjor, Ibrahim",
title="Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women - United States and Territories, May 2016.",
journal="MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report",
year="2016",
month="May",
day="27",
volume="65",
number="20",
pages="514--519",
abstract="Zika virus is a cause of microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1), and it is the first known mosquito-borne infection to cause congenital anomalies in humans. The establishment of a comprehensive surveillance system to monitor pregnant women with Zika virus infection will provide data to further elucidate the full range of potential outcomes for fetuses and infants of mothers with asymptomatic and symptomatic Zika virus infection during pregnancy. In February 2016, Zika virus disease and congenital Zika virus infections became nationally notifiable conditions in the United States (2). Cases in pregnant women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection who have either 1) symptomatic infection or 2) asymptomatic infection with diagnosed complications of pregnancy can be reported as cases of Zika virus disease to ArboNET* (2), CDC's national arboviral diseases surveillance system. Under existing interim guidelines from the Council for State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), asymptomatic Zika virus infections in pregnant women who do not have known pregnancy complications are not reportable. ArboNET does not currently include pregnancy surveillance information (e.g., gestational age or pregnancy exposures) or pregnancy outcomes. To understand the full impact of infection on the fetus and neonate, other systems are needed for reporting and active monitoring of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Thus, in collaboration with state, local, tribal, and territorial health departments, CDC established two surveillance systems to monitor pregnancies and congenital outcomes among women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection({\textdagger}) in the United States and territories: 1) the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR),({\textsection}) which monitors pregnant women residing in U.S. states and all U.S. territories except Puerto Rico, and 2) the Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System (ZAPSS), which monitors pregnant women residing in Puerto Rico. As of May 12, 2016, the surveillance systems were monitoring 157 and 122 pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection from participating U.S. states and territories, respectively. Tracking and monitoring clinical presentation of Zika virus infection, all prenatal testing, and adverse consequences of Zika virus infection during pregnancy are critical to better characterize the risk for congenital infection, the performance of prenatal diagnostic testing, and the spectrum of adverse congenital outcomes. These data will improve clinical guidance, inform counseling messages for pregnant women, and facilitate planning for clinical and public health services for affected families.",
issn="1545-861X",
doi="10.15585/mmwr.mm6520e1",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27248295",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women - United States and Territories, May 2016.
%A Simeone, Regina M.
%A Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K.
%A Meaney-Delman, Dana
%A Petersen, Emily E.
%A Galang, Romeo R.
%A Oduyebo, Titilope
%A Rivera-Garcia, Brenda
%A Valencia-Prado, Miguel
%A Newsome, Kimberly B.
%A P?rez-Padilla, Janice
%A Williams, Tonya R.
%A Biggerstaff, Matthew
%A Jamieson, Denise J.
%A Honein, Margaret A.
%A Ahmed, Farah
%A Anesi, Scott
%A Arnold, Kathryn E.
%A Barradas, Danielle
%A Barter, Devra
%A Bertolli, Jeanne
%A Bingham, Andrea M.
%A Bollock, Jan
%A Bosse, Trish
%A Bradley, Kristy K.
%A Brady, Diane
%A Brown, Catherine M.
%A Bryan, Katie
%A Buchanan, Victoria
%A Bullard, Ponce D.
%A Carrigan, Alice
%A Clouse, Monica
%A Cook, Sally
%A Cooper, Michael
%A Davidson, Sherri
%A DeBarr, Ariana
%A Dobbs, Thomas
%A Dunams, Tambra
%A Eason, Jeffrey
%A Eckert, Amanda
%A Eggers, Paula
%A Ellington, Sascha R.
%A Feldpausch, Amanda
%A Fredette, Carolyn R.
%A Gabel, Julie
%A Glover, Maleeka
%A Gosciminski, Michael
%A Gay, Margarita
%A Haddock, Robert
%A Hand, Sheryl
%A Hardy, Jessica
%A Hartel, Marie E. Bottomley
%A Hennenfent, Andrew K.
%A Hills, Susan L.
%A House, Jennifer
%A Igbinosa, Iro
%A Im, Lucy
%A Jeff, Hamik
%A Khan, Sumaiya
%A Kightlinger, Lon
%A Ko, Jean Y.
%A Koirala, Samir
%A Korhonen, Lauren
%A Krishnasamy, Vikram
%A Kurkjian, Katie
%A Lampe, Margaret
%A Larson, Sandra
%A Lee, Ellen H.
%A Lind, Leah
%A Lindquist, Scott
%A Long, Jonah
%A Macdonald, Jennifer
%A MacFarquhar, Jennifer
%A Mackie, Daniel P.
%A Mark-Carew, Miguella
%A Martin, Brennan
%A Martinez-Qui?ones, Alma
%A Matthews-Greer, Janice
%A McGee, Sasha A.
%A McLaughlin, Joe
%A Mock, Valerie
%A Muna, Esther
%A Oltean, Hanna
%A O'Mallan, Josephine
%A Pagano, H. Pamela
%A Park, Sarah Y.
%A Peterson, Dallin
%A Polen, Kara N. D.
%A Porse, Charsey Cole
%A Rao, Carol Y.
%A Ropri, Abubakar
%A Rinsky, Jessica
%A Robinson, Sara
%A Rosinger, Asher Y.
%A Ruberto, Irene
%A Schiffman, Elizabeth
%A Scott-Waldron, Christine
%A Semple, Shereen
%A Sharp, Tyler
%A Short, Kirstin
%A Signs, Kimberly
%A Slavinski, Sally A.
%A Stevens, Taryn
%A Sweatlock, Joseph
%A Talbot, Elizabeth A.
%A Tonzel, Julius
%A Traxler, Rita
%A Tubach, Sheri
%A Van Houten, Clayton
%A VinHatton, Elizabeth
%A Viray, Melissa
%A Virginie, Daguise
%A Warren, Michael D.
%A Waters, Catherine
%A White, Paul
%A Williams, Tanya
%A Winters, Ann I.
%A Wood, Shelley
%A Zaganjor, Ibrahim
%A Zika and Pregnancy Working Group
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
%D 2016
%8 May 27
%V 65
%N 20
%@ 1545-861X
%G eng
%F Simeone2016
%X Zika virus is a cause of microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1), and it is the first known mosquito-borne infection to cause congenital anomalies in humans. The establishment of a comprehensive surveillance system to monitor pregnant women with Zika virus infection will provide data to further elucidate the full range of potential outcomes for fetuses and infants of mothers with asymptomatic and symptomatic Zika virus infection during pregnancy. In February 2016, Zika virus disease and congenital Zika virus infections became nationally notifiable conditions in the United States (2). Cases in pregnant women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection who have either 1) symptomatic infection or 2) asymptomatic infection with diagnosed complications of pregnancy can be reported as cases of Zika virus disease to ArboNET* (2), CDC's national arboviral diseases surveillance system. Under existing interim guidelines from the Council for State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), asymptomatic Zika virus infections in pregnant women who do not have known pregnancy complications are not reportable. ArboNET does not currently include pregnancy surveillance information (e.g., gestational age or pregnancy exposures) or pregnancy outcomes. To understand the full impact of infection on the fetus and neonate, other systems are needed for reporting and active monitoring of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Thus, in collaboration with state, local, tribal, and territorial health departments, CDC established two surveillance systems to monitor pregnancies and congenital outcomes among women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection(?) in the United States and territories: 1) the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR),(?) which monitors pregnant women residing in U.S. states and all U.S. territories except Puerto Rico, and 2) the Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System (ZAPSS), which monitors pregnant women residing in Puerto Rico. As of May 12, 2016, the surveillance systems were monitoring 157 and 122 pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection from participating U.S. states and territories, respectively. Tracking and monitoring clinical presentation of Zika virus infection, all prenatal testing, and adverse consequences of Zika virus infection during pregnancy are critical to better characterize the risk for congenital infection, the performance of prenatal diagnostic testing, and the spectrum of adverse congenital outcomes. These data will improve clinical guidance, inform counseling messages for pregnant women, and facilitate planning for clinical and public health services for affected families.
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6520e1
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27248295
%P 514-519

PT Journal
AU Simeone, RM
   Shapiro-Mendoza, CK
   Meaney-Delman, D
   Petersen, EE
   Galang, RR
   Oduyebo, T
   Rivera-Garcia, B
   Valencia-Prado, M
   Newsome, KB
   P?rez-Padilla, J
   Williams, TR
   Biggerstaff, M
   Jamieson, DJ
   Honein, MA
   Ahmed, F
   Anesi, S
   Arnold, KE
   Barradas, D
   Barter, D
   Bertolli, J
   Bingham, AM
   Bollock, J
   Bosse, T
   Bradley, KK
   Brady, D
   Brown, CM
   Bryan, K
   Buchanan, V
   Bullard, PD
   Carrigan, A
   Clouse, M
   Cook, S
   Cooper, M
   Davidson, S
   DeBarr, A
   Dobbs, T
   Dunams, T
   Eason, J
   Eckert, A
   Eggers, P
   Ellington, SR
   Feldpausch, A
   Fredette, CR
   Gabel, J
   Glover, M
   Gosciminski, M
   Gay, M
   Haddock, R
   Hand, S
   Hardy, J
   Hartel, MEB
   Hennenfent, AK
   Hills, SL
   House, J
   Igbinosa, I
   Im, L
   Jeff, H
   Khan, S
   Kightlinger, L
   Ko, JY
   Koirala, S
   Korhonen, L
   Krishnasamy, V
   Kurkjian, K
   Lampe, M
   Larson, S
   Lee, EH
   Lind, L
   Lindquist, S
   Long, J
   Macdonald, J
   MacFarquhar, J
   Mackie, DP
   Mark-Carew, M
   Martin, B
   Martinez-Qui?ones, A
   Matthews-Greer, J
   McGee, SA
   McLaughlin, J
   Mock, V
   Muna, E
   Oltean, H
   O'Mallan, J
   Pagano, HP
   Park, SY
   Peterson, D
   Polen, KND
   Porse, CC
   Rao, CY
   Ropri, A
   Rinsky, J
   Robinson, S
   Rosinger, AY
   Ruberto, I
   Schiffman, E
   Scott-Waldron, C
   Semple, S
   Sharp, T
   Short, K
   Signs, K
   Slavinski, SA
   Stevens, T
   Sweatlock, J
   Talbot, EA
   Tonzel, J
   Traxler, R
   Tubach, S
   Van Houten, C
   VinHatton, E
   Viray, M
   Virginie, D
   Warren, MD
   Waters, C
   White, P
   Williams, T
   Winters, AI
   Wood, S
   Zaganjor, I
AU Zika and Pregnancy Working Group
TI Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women - United States and Territories, May 2016.
SO MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JI MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
PD 05
PY 2016
BP 514
EP 519
VL 65
IS 20
DI 10.15585/mmwr.mm6520e1
LA eng
AB Zika virus is a cause of microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1), and it is the first known mosquito-borne infection to cause congenital anomalies in humans. The establishment of a comprehensive surveillance system to monitor pregnant women with Zika virus infection will provide data to further elucidate the full range of potential outcomes for fetuses and infants of mothers with asymptomatic and symptomatic Zika virus infection during pregnancy. In February 2016, Zika virus disease and congenital Zika virus infections became nationally notifiable conditions in the United States (2). Cases in pregnant women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection who have either 1) symptomatic infection or 2) asymptomatic infection with diagnosed complications of pregnancy can be reported as cases of Zika virus disease to ArboNET* (2), CDC's national arboviral diseases surveillance system. Under existing interim guidelines from the Council for State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), asymptomatic Zika virus infections in pregnant women who do not have known pregnancy complications are not reportable. ArboNET does not currently include pregnancy surveillance information (e.g., gestational age or pregnancy exposures) or pregnancy outcomes. To understand the full impact of infection on the fetus and neonate, other systems are needed for reporting and active monitoring of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Thus, in collaboration with state, local, tribal, and territorial health departments, CDC established two surveillance systems to monitor pregnancies and congenital outcomes among women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection(?) in the United States and territories: 1) the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR),(?) which monitors pregnant women residing in U.S. states and all U.S. territories except Puerto Rico, and 2) the Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System (ZAPSS), which monitors pregnant women residing in Puerto Rico. As of May 12, 2016, the surveillance systems were monitoring 157 and 122 pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection from participating U.S. states and territories, respectively. Tracking and monitoring clinical presentation of Zika virus infection, all prenatal testing, and adverse consequences of Zika virus infection during pregnancy are critical to better characterize the risk for congenital infection, the performance of prenatal diagnostic testing, and the spectrum of adverse congenital outcomes. These data will improve clinical guidance, inform counseling messages for pregnant women, and facilitate planning for clinical and public health services for affected families.
ER

PMID- 27248295
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
DA  - 20160602
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 65
IP  - 20
DP  - 2016
TI  - Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women - United States and
      Territories, May 2016.
PG  - 514-9
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6520e1 [doi]
AB  - Zika virus is a cause of microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1), and it is the 
      first known mosquito-borne infection to cause congenital anomalies in humans. The
      establishment of a comprehensive surveillance system to monitor pregnant women
      with Zika virus infection will provide data to further elucidate the full range
      of potential outcomes for fetuses and infants of mothers with asymptomatic and
      symptomatic Zika virus infection during pregnancy. In February 2016, Zika virus
      disease and congenital Zika virus infections became nationally notifiable
      conditions in the United States (2). Cases in pregnant women with laboratory
      evidence of Zika virus infection who have either 1) symptomatic infection or 2)
      asymptomatic infection with diagnosed complications of pregnancy can be reported 
      as cases of Zika virus disease to ArboNET* (2), CDC's national arboviral diseases
      surveillance system. Under existing interim guidelines from the Council for State
      and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), asymptomatic Zika virus infections in
      pregnant women who do not have known pregnancy complications are not reportable. 
      ArboNET does not currently include pregnancy surveillance information (e.g.,
      gestational age or pregnancy exposures) or pregnancy outcomes. To understand the 
      full impact of infection on the fetus and neonate, other systems are needed for
      reporting and active monitoring of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of
      possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Thus, in collaboration with
      state, local, tribal, and territorial health departments, CDC established two
      surveillance systems to monitor pregnancies and congenital outcomes among women
      with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection(dagger) in the United States and
      territories: 1) the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR),( section sign) which
      monitors pregnant women residing in U.S. states and all U.S. territories except
      Puerto Rico, and 2) the Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System (ZAPSS), which 
      monitors pregnant women residing in Puerto Rico. As of May 12, 2016, the
      surveillance systems were monitoring 157 and 122 pregnant women with laboratory
      evidence of possible Zika virus infection from participating U.S. states and
      territories, respectively. Tracking and monitoring clinical presentation of Zika 
      virus infection, all prenatal testing, and adverse consequences of Zika virus
      infection during pregnancy are critical to better characterize the risk for
      congenital infection, the performance of prenatal diagnostic testing, and the
      spectrum of adverse congenital outcomes. These data will improve clinical
      guidance, inform counseling messages for pregnant women, and facilitate planning 
      for clinical and public health services for affected families.
FAU - Simeone, Regina M
AU  - Simeone RM
FAU - Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K
AU  - Shapiro-Mendoza CK
FAU - Meaney-Delman, Dana
AU  - Meaney-Delman D
FAU - Petersen, Emily E
AU  - Petersen EE
FAU - Galang, Romeo R
AU  - Galang RR
FAU - Oduyebo, Titilope
AU  - Oduyebo T
FAU - Rivera-Garcia, Brenda
AU  - Rivera-Garcia B
FAU - Valencia-Prado, Miguel
AU  - Valencia-Prado M
FAU - Newsome, Kimberly B
AU  - Newsome KB
FAU - Perez-Padilla, Janice
AU  - Perez-Padilla J
FAU - Williams, Tonya R
AU  - Williams TR
FAU - Biggerstaff, Matthew
AU  - Biggerstaff M
FAU - Jamieson, Denise J
AU  - Jamieson DJ
FAU - Honein, Margaret A
AU  - Honein MA
CN  - Zika and Pregnancy Working Group
FAU - Ahmed, Farah
AU  - Ahmed F
FAU - Anesi, Scott
AU  - Anesi S
FAU - Arnold, Kathryn E
AU  - Arnold KE
FAU - Barradas, Danielle
AU  - Barradas D
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AU  - VinHatton E
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LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160527
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
EDAT- 2016/06/02 06:00
MHDA- 2016/06/02 06:00
CRDT- 2016/06/02 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6520e1 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016 May 27;65(20):514-9. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6520e1.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Simeone, Regina M.
AU  - Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K.
AU  - Meaney-Delman, Dana
AU  - Petersen, Emily E.
AU  - Galang, Romeo R.
AU  - Oduyebo, Titilope
AU  - Rivera-Garcia, Brenda
AU  - Valencia-Prado, Miguel
AU  - Newsome, Kimberly B.
AU  - P?rez-Padilla, Janice
AU  - Williams, Tonya R.
AU  - Biggerstaff, Matthew
AU  - Jamieson, Denise J.
AU  - Honein, Margaret A.
AU  - Ahmed, Farah
AU  - Anesi, Scott
AU  - Arnold, Kathryn E.
AU  - Barradas, Danielle
AU  - Barter, Devra
AU  - Bertolli, Jeanne
AU  - Bingham, Andrea M.
AU  - Bollock, Jan
AU  - Bosse, Trish
AU  - Bradley, Kristy K.
AU  - Brady, Diane
AU  - Brown, Catherine M.
AU  - Bryan, Katie
AU  - Buchanan, Victoria
AU  - Bullard, Ponce D.
AU  - Carrigan, Alice
AU  - Clouse, Monica
AU  - Cook, Sally
AU  - Cooper, Michael
AU  - Davidson, Sherri
AU  - DeBarr, Ariana
AU  - Dobbs, Thomas
AU  - Dunams, Tambra
AU  - Eason, Jeffrey
AU  - Eckert, Amanda
AU  - Eggers, Paula
AU  - Ellington, Sascha R.
AU  - Feldpausch, Amanda
AU  - Fredette, Carolyn R.
AU  - Gabel, Julie
AU  - Glover, Maleeka
AU  - Gosciminski, Michael
AU  - Gay, Margarita
AU  - Haddock, Robert
AU  - Hand, Sheryl
AU  - Hardy, Jessica
AU  - Hartel, Marie E. Bottomley
AU  - Hennenfent, Andrew K.
AU  - Hills, Susan L.
AU  - House, Jennifer
AU  - Igbinosa, Iro
AU  - Im, Lucy
AU  - Jeff, Hamik
AU  - Khan, Sumaiya
AU  - Kightlinger, Lon
AU  - Ko, Jean Y.
AU  - Koirala, Samir
AU  - Korhonen, Lauren
AU  - Krishnasamy, Vikram
AU  - Kurkjian, Katie
AU  - Lampe, Margaret
AU  - Larson, Sandra
AU  - Lee, Ellen H.
AU  - Lind, Leah
AU  - Lindquist, Scott
AU  - Long, Jonah
AU  - Macdonald, Jennifer
AU  - MacFarquhar, Jennifer
AU  - Mackie, Daniel P.
AU  - Mark-Carew, Miguella
AU  - Martin, Brennan
AU  - Martinez-Qui?ones, Alma
AU  - Matthews-Greer, Janice
AU  - McGee, Sasha A.
AU  - McLaughlin, Joe
AU  - Mock, Valerie
AU  - Muna, Esther
AU  - Oltean, Hanna
AU  - O'Mallan, Josephine
AU  - Pagano, H. Pamela
AU  - Park, Sarah Y.
AU  - Peterson, Dallin
AU  - Polen, Kara N. D.
AU  - Porse, Charsey Cole
AU  - Rao, Carol Y.
AU  - Ropri, Abubakar
AU  - Rinsky, Jessica
AU  - Robinson, Sara
AU  - Rosinger, Asher Y.
AU  - Ruberto, Irene
AU  - Schiffman, Elizabeth
AU  - Scott-Waldron, Christine
AU  - Semple, Shereen
AU  - Sharp, Tyler
AU  - Short, Kirstin
AU  - Signs, Kimberly
AU  - Slavinski, Sally A.
AU  - Stevens, Taryn
AU  - Sweatlock, Joseph
AU  - Talbot, Elizabeth A.
AU  - Tonzel, Julius
AU  - Traxler, Rita
AU  - Tubach, Sheri
AU  - Van Houten, Clayton
AU  - VinHatton, Elizabeth
AU  - Viray, Melissa
AU  - Virginie, Daguise
AU  - Warren, Michael D.
AU  - Waters, Catherine
AU  - White, Paul
AU  - Williams, Tanya
AU  - Winters, Ann I.
AU  - Wood, Shelley
AU  - Zaganjor, Ibrahim
AU  - Zika and Pregnancy Working Group
PY  - 2016/05/27
TI  - Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women - United States and Territories, May 2016.
T2  - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
JO  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
SP  - 514
EP  - 519
VL  - 65
IS  - 20
N2  - Zika virus is a cause of microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1), and it is the first known mosquito-borne infection to cause congenital anomalies in humans. The establishment of a comprehensive surveillance system to monitor pregnant women with Zika virus infection will provide data to further elucidate the full range of potential outcomes for fetuses and infants of mothers with asymptomatic and symptomatic Zika virus infection during pregnancy. In February 2016, Zika virus disease and congenital Zika virus infections became nationally notifiable conditions in the United States (2). Cases in pregnant women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection who have either 1) symptomatic infection or 2) asymptomatic infection with diagnosed complications of pregnancy can be reported as cases of Zika virus disease to ArboNET* (2), CDC's national arboviral diseases surveillance system. Under existing interim guidelines from the Council for State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), asymptomatic Zika virus infections in pregnant women who do not have known pregnancy complications are not reportable. ArboNET does not currently include pregnancy surveillance information (e.g., gestational age or pregnancy exposures) or pregnancy outcomes. To understand the full impact of infection on the fetus and neonate, other systems are needed for reporting and active monitoring of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Thus, in collaboration with state, local, tribal, and territorial health departments, CDC established two surveillance systems to monitor pregnancies and congenital outcomes among women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection(?) in the United States and territories: 1) the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR),(?) which monitors pregnant women residing in U.S. states and all U.S. territories except Puerto Rico, and 2) the Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System (ZAPSS), which monitors pregnant women residing in Puerto Rico. As of May 12, 2016, the surveillance systems were monitoring 157 and 122 pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection from participating U.S. states and territories, respectively. Tracking and monitoring clinical presentation of Zika virus infection, all prenatal testing, and adverse consequences of Zika virus infection during pregnancy are critical to better characterize the risk for congenital infection, the performance of prenatal diagnostic testing, and the spectrum of adverse congenital outcomes. These data will improve clinical guidance, inform counseling messages for pregnant women, and facilitate planning for clinical and public health services for affected families.
SN  - 1545-861X
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6520e1
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27248295
ID  - Simeone2016
ER  - 
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<b:Person><b:Last>VinHatton</b:Last><b:First>Elizabeth</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Viray</b:Last><b:First>Melissa</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Virginie</b:Last><b:First>Daguise</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Warren</b:Last><b:First>Michael</b:First><b:Middle>D</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Waters</b:Last><b:First>Catherine</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>White</b:Last><b:First>Paul</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Williams</b:Last><b:First>Tanya</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Winters</b:Last><b:First>Ann</b:First><b:Middle>I</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Wood</b:Last><b:First>Shelley</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Zaganjor</b:Last><b:First>Ibrahim</b:First></b:Person>
</b:NameList></b:Author>
</b:Author>
<b:Title>Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women - United States and Territories, May 2016.</b:Title>
 <b:ShortTitle>MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.</b:ShortTitle>
<b:Comments>Zika virus is a cause of microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1), and it is the first known mosquito-borne infection to cause congenital anomalies in humans. The establishment of a comprehensive surveillance system to monitor pregnant women with Zika virus infection will provide data to further elucidate the full range of potential outcomes for fetuses and infants of mothers with asymptomatic and symptomatic Zika virus infection during pregnancy. In February 2016, Zika virus disease and congenital Zika virus infections became nationally notifiable conditions in the United States (2). Cases in pregnant women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection who have either 1) symptomatic infection or 2) asymptomatic infection with diagnosed complications of pregnancy can be reported as cases of Zika virus disease to ArboNET* (2), CDC&apos;s national arboviral diseases surveillance system. Under existing interim guidelines from the Council for State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), asymptomatic Zika virus infections in pregnant women who do not have known pregnancy complications are not reportable. ArboNET does not currently include pregnancy surveillance information (e.g., gestational age or pregnancy exposures) or pregnancy outcomes. To understand the full impact of infection on the fetus and neonate, other systems are needed for reporting and active monitoring of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Thus, in collaboration with state, local, tribal, and territorial health departments, CDC established two surveillance systems to monitor pregnancies and congenital outcomes among women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection(&#8224;) in the United States and territories: 1) the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR),(&#167;) which monitors pregnant women residing in U.S. states and all U.S. territories except Puerto Rico, and 2) the Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System (ZAPSS), which monitors pregnant women residing in Puerto Rico. As of May 12, 2016, the surveillance systems were monitoring 157 and 122 pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection from participating U.S. states and territories, respectively. Tracking and monitoring clinical presentation of Zika virus infection, all prenatal testing, and adverse consequences of Zika virus infection during pregnancy are critical to better characterize the risk for congenital infection, the performance of prenatal diagnostic testing, and the spectrum of adverse congenital outcomes. These data will improve clinical guidance, inform counseling messages for pregnant women, and facilitate planning for clinical and public health services for affected families.</b:Comments>
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</b:Sources>