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Patterns in Zika Virus Testing and Infection, by Report of Symptoms and Pregnancy Status - United States, January 3-March 5, 2016.

Abstract CDC recommends Zika virus testing for potentially exposed persons with signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease, and recommends that health care providers offer testing to asymptomatic pregnant women within 12 weeks of exposure. During January 3-March 5, 2016, Zika virus testing was performed for 4,534 persons who traveled to or moved from areas with active Zika virus transmission; 3,335 (73.6%) were pregnant women. Among persons who received testing, 1,541 (34.0%) reported at least one Zika virus-associated sign or symptom (e.g., fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis), 436 (9.6%) reported at least one other clinical sign or symptom only, and 2,557 (56.4%) reported no signs or symptoms. Among 1,541 persons with one or more Zika virus-associated symptoms who received testing, 182 (11.8%) had confirmed Zika virus infection. Among the 2,557 asymptomatic persons who received testing, 2,425 (94.8%) were pregnant women, seven (0.3%) of whom had confirmed Zika virus infection. Although risk for Zika virus infection might vary based on exposure-related factors (e.g., location and duration of travel), in the current setting in U.S. states, where there is no local transmission, most asymptomatic pregnant women who receive testing do not have Zika virus infection.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start
%A Dasgupta, Sharoda; Reagan-Steiner, Sarah; Goodenough, Dana; Russell, Kate; Tanner, Mary; Lewis, Lillianne; Petersen, Emily E.; Powers, Ann M.; Kniss, Krista; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Oduyebo, Titilope; O'Leary, Dan; Chiu, Sophia; Talley, Pamela; Hennessey, Morgan; Hills, Susan; Cohn, Amanda; Gregory, Christopher
%A Zika Virus Response Epidemiology and Laboratory Team
%T Patterns in Zika Virus Testing and Infection, by Report of Symptoms and Pregnancy Status - United States, January 3-March 5, 2016.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, vol. 65, no. 15, pp. 395-399
%D 04/2016
%V 65
%N 15
%M eng
%B CDC recommends Zika virus testing for potentially exposed persons with signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease, and recommends that health care providers offer testing to asymptomatic pregnant women within 12 weeks of exposure. During January 3-March 5, 2016, Zika virus testing was performed for 4,534 persons who traveled to or moved from areas with active Zika virus transmission; 3,335 (73.6%) were pregnant women. Among persons who received testing, 1,541 (34.0%) reported at least one Zika virus-associated sign or symptom (e.g., fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis), 436 (9.6%) reported at least one other clinical sign or symptom only, and 2,557 (56.4%) reported no signs or symptoms. Among 1,541 persons with one or more Zika virus-associated symptoms who received testing, 182 (11.8%) had confirmed Zika virus infection. Among the 2,557 asymptomatic persons who received testing, 2,425 (94.8%) were pregnant women, seven (0.3%) of whom had confirmed Zika virus infection. Although risk for Zika virus infection might vary based on exposure-related factors (e.g., location and duration of travel), in the current setting in U.S. states, where there is no local transmission, most asymptomatic pregnant women who receive testing do not have Zika virus infection.
%P 395
%L 399
%Y 10.15585/mmwr.mm6515e1
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2016.......65..395D

@Article{Dasgupta2016,
author="Dasgupta, Sharoda
and Reagan-Steiner, Sarah
and Goodenough, Dana
and Russell, Kate
and Tanner, Mary
and Lewis, Lillianne
and Petersen, Emily E.
and Powers, Ann M.
and Kniss, Krista
and Meaney-Delman, Dana
and Oduyebo, Titilope
and O'Leary, Dan
and Chiu, Sophia
and Talley, Pamela
and Hennessey, Morgan
and Hills, Susan
and Cohn, Amanda
and Gregory, Christopher
and {Zika Virus Response Epidemiology and Laboratory Team}",
title="Patterns in Zika Virus Testing and Infection, by Report of Symptoms and Pregnancy Status - United States, January 3-March 5, 2016.",
journal="MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report",
year="2016",
month="Apr",
day="22",
volume="65",
number="15",
pages="395--399",
abstract="CDC recommends Zika virus testing for potentially exposed persons with signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease, and recommends that health care providers offer testing to asymptomatic pregnant women within 12 weeks of exposure. During January 3-March 5, 2016, Zika virus testing was performed for 4,534 persons who traveled to or moved from areas with active Zika virus transmission; 3,335 (73.6\%) were pregnant women. Among persons who received testing, 1,541 (34.0\%) reported at least one Zika virus-associated sign or symptom (e.g., fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis), 436 (9.6\%) reported at least one other clinical sign or symptom only, and 2,557 (56.4\%) reported no signs or symptoms. Among 1,541 persons with one or more Zika virus-associated symptoms who received testing, 182 (11.8\%) had confirmed Zika virus infection. Among the 2,557 asymptomatic persons who received testing, 2,425 (94.8\%) were pregnant women, seven (0.3\%) of whom had confirmed Zika virus infection. Although risk for Zika virus infection might vary based on exposure-related factors (e.g., location and duration of travel), in the current setting in U.S. states, where there is no local transmission, most asymptomatic pregnant women who receive testing do not have Zika virus infection.",
issn="1545-861X",
doi="10.15585/mmwr.mm6515e1",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27101541",
language="eng"
}


PT Journal
AU Dasgupta, S
   Reagan-Steiner, S
   Goodenough, D
   Russell, K
   Tanner, M
   Lewis, L
   Petersen, EE
   Powers, AM
   Kniss, K
   Meaney-Delman, D
   Oduyebo, T
   O'Leary, D
   Chiu, S
   Talley, P
   Hennessey, M
   Hills, S
   Cohn, A
   Gregory, C
AU Zika Virus Response Epidemiology and Laboratory Team
TI Patterns in Zika Virus Testing and Infection, by Report of Symptoms and Pregnancy Status - United States, January 3-March 5, 2016.
SO MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JI MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
PD 04
PY 2016
BP 395
EP 399
VL 65
IS 15
DI 10.15585/mmwr.mm6515e1
LA eng
AB CDC recommends Zika virus testing for potentially exposed persons with signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease, and recommends that health care providers offer testing to asymptomatic pregnant women within 12 weeks of exposure. During January 3-March 5, 2016, Zika virus testing was performed for 4,534 persons who traveled to or moved from areas with active Zika virus transmission; 3,335 (73.6%) were pregnant women. Among persons who received testing, 1,541 (34.0%) reported at least one Zika virus-associated sign or symptom (e.g., fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis), 436 (9.6%) reported at least one other clinical sign or symptom only, and 2,557 (56.4%) reported no signs or symptoms. Among 1,541 persons with one or more Zika virus-associated symptoms who received testing, 182 (11.8%) had confirmed Zika virus infection. Among the 2,557 asymptomatic persons who received testing, 2,425 (94.8%) were pregnant women, seven (0.3%) of whom had confirmed Zika virus infection. Although risk for Zika virus infection might vary based on exposure-related factors (e.g., location and duration of travel), in the current setting in U.S. states, where there is no local transmission, most asymptomatic pregnant women who receive testing do not have Zika virus infection.
ER


TY  - JOUR
AU  - Dasgupta, Sharoda
AU  - Reagan-Steiner, Sarah
AU  - Goodenough, Dana
AU  - Russell, Kate
AU  - Tanner, Mary
AU  - Lewis, Lillianne
AU  - Petersen, Emily E.
AU  - Powers, Ann M.
AU  - Kniss, Krista
AU  - Meaney-Delman, Dana
AU  - Oduyebo, Titilope
AU  - O'Leary, Dan
AU  - Chiu, Sophia
AU  - Talley, Pamela
AU  - Hennessey, Morgan
AU  - Hills, Susan
AU  - Cohn, Amanda
AU  - Gregory, Christopher
AU  - Zika Virus Response Epidemiology and Laboratory Team
PY  - 2016/04/22
TI  - Patterns in Zika Virus Testing and Infection, by Report of Symptoms and Pregnancy Status - United States, January 3-March 5, 2016.
T2  - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
JO  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
SP  - 395
EP  - 399
VL  - 65
IS  - 15
N2  - CDC recommends Zika virus testing for potentially exposed persons with signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease, and recommends that health care providers offer testing to asymptomatic pregnant women within 12 weeks of exposure. During January 3-March 5, 2016, Zika virus testing was performed for 4,534 persons who traveled to or moved from areas with active Zika virus transmission; 3,335 (73.6%) were pregnant women. Among persons who received testing, 1,541 (34.0%) reported at least one Zika virus-associated sign or symptom (e.g., fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis), 436 (9.6%) reported at least one other clinical sign or symptom only, and 2,557 (56.4%) reported no signs or symptoms. Among 1,541 persons with one or more Zika virus-associated symptoms who received testing, 182 (11.8%) had confirmed Zika virus infection. Among the 2,557 asymptomatic persons who received testing, 2,425 (94.8%) were pregnant women, seven (0.3%) of whom had confirmed Zika virus infection. Although risk for Zika virus infection might vary based on exposure-related factors (e.g., location and duration of travel), in the current setting in U.S. states, where there is no local transmission, most asymptomatic pregnant women who receive testing do not have Zika virus infection.
SN  - 1545-861X
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6515e1
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27101541
ID  - Dasgupta2016
ER  -