PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure--United States, 2016.

Abstract CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for women of reproductive age with possible Zika virus exposure to include recommendations on counseling women and men with possible Zika virus exposure who are interested in conceiving. This guidance is based on limited available data on persistence of Zika virus RNA in blood and semen. Women who have Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after symptom onset to attempt conception, and men with Zika virus disease should wait at least 6 months after symptom onset to attempt conception. Women and men with possible exposure to Zika virus but without clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after exposure to attempt conception. Possible exposure to Zika virus is defined as travel to or residence in an area of active Zika virus transmission ( http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html), or sex (vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, or fellatio) without a condom with a man who traveled to or resided in an area of active transmission. Women and men who reside in areas of active Zika virus transmission should talk with their health care provider about attempting conception. This guidance also provides updated recommendations on testing of pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure. These recommendations will be updated when additional data become available.
PMID
Related Publications

Interim Guidelines for Pregnant Women During a Zika Virus Outbreak--United States, 2016.

Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women with Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States, July 2016.

Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Infants and Children with Possible Zika Virus Infection--United States, February 2016.

Update: Interim Guidance for Prevention of Sexual Transmission of Zika Virus--United States, 2016.

Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women and Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States, 2016.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Health Personnel

Practice Guidelines as Topic

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start
%A Petersen, Emily E.; Polen, Kara N. D.; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Ellington, Sascha R.; Oduyebo, Titilope; Cohn, Amanda; Oster, Alexandra M.; Russell, Kate; Kawwass, Jennifer F.; Karwowski, Mateusz P.; Powers, Ann M.; Bertolli, Jeanne; Brooks, John T.; Kissin, Dmitry; Villanueva, Julie; Mu?oz-Jordan, Jorge; Kuehnert, Matthew; Olson, Christine K.; Honein, Margaret A.; Rivera, Maria; Jamieson, Denise J.; Rasmussen, Sonja A.
%T Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure--United States, 2016.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, vol. 65, no. 12, pp. 315-322
%D 04/2016
%V 65
%N 12
%M eng
%B CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for women of reproductive age with possible Zika virus exposure to include recommendations on counseling women and men with possible Zika virus exposure who are interested in conceiving. This guidance is based on limited available data on persistence of Zika virus RNA in blood and semen. Women who have Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after symptom onset to attempt conception, and men with Zika virus disease should wait at least 6 months after symptom onset to attempt conception. Women and men with possible exposure to Zika virus but without clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after exposure to attempt conception. Possible exposure to Zika virus is defined as travel to or residence in an area of active Zika virus transmission ( http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html), or sex (vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, or fellatio) without a condom with a man who traveled to or resided in an area of active transmission. Women and men who reside in areas of active Zika virus transmission should talk with their health care provider about attempting conception. This guidance also provides updated recommendations on testing of pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure. These recommendations will be updated when additional data become available.
%K Adolescent, Adult, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.), Diagnostic Tests, Routine, Directive Counseling, Disease Outbreaks, Female, Health Personnel, Humans, Infertility, Female, Male, Mass Screening, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Preconception Care, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Residence Characteristics, Travel, United States, Young Adult, Zika Virus Infection
%P 315
%L 322
%Y 10.15585/mmwr.mm6512e2
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2016.......65..315P

@Article{Petersen2016,
author="Petersen, Emily E.
and Polen, Kara N. D.
and Meaney-Delman, Dana
and Ellington, Sascha R.
and Oduyebo, Titilope
and Cohn, Amanda
and Oster, Alexandra M.
and Russell, Kate
and Kawwass, Jennifer F.
and Karwowski, Mateusz P.
and Powers, Ann M.
and Bertolli, Jeanne
and Brooks, John T.
and Kissin, Dmitry
and Villanueva, Julie
and Mu{\~n}oz-Jordan, Jorge
and Kuehnert, Matthew
and Olson, Christine K.
and Honein, Margaret A.
and Rivera, Maria
and Jamieson, Denise J.
and Rasmussen, Sonja A.",
title="Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure--United States, 2016.",
journal="MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report",
year="2016",
month="Apr",
day="01",
volume="65",
number="12",
pages="315--322",
keywords="Adolescent",
keywords="Adult",
keywords="Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)",
keywords="Diagnostic Tests, Routine",
keywords="Directive Counseling",
keywords="Disease Outbreaks",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Health Personnel",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Infertility, Female",
keywords="Male",
keywords="Mass Screening",
keywords="Practice Guidelines as Topic",
keywords="Preconception Care",
keywords="Pregnancy",
keywords="Pregnancy Complications, Infectious",
keywords="Residence Characteristics",
keywords="Travel",
keywords="United States",
keywords="Young Adult",
keywords="Zika Virus Infection",
abstract="CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for women of reproductive age with possible Zika virus exposure to include recommendations on counseling women and men with possible Zika virus exposure who are interested in conceiving. This guidance is based on limited available data on persistence of Zika virus RNA in blood and semen. Women who have Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after symptom onset to attempt conception, and men with Zika virus disease should wait at least 6 months after symptom onset to attempt conception. Women and men with possible exposure to Zika virus but without clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after exposure to attempt conception. Possible exposure to Zika virus is defined as travel to or residence in an area of active Zika virus transmission ( http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html), or sex (vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, or fellatio) without a condom with a man who traveled to or resided in an area of active transmission. Women and men who reside in areas of active Zika virus transmission should talk with their health care provider about attempting conception. This guidance also provides updated recommendations on testing of pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure. These recommendations will be updated when additional data become available.",
issn="1545-861X",
doi="10.15585/mmwr.mm6512e2",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27031943",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure--United States, 2016.
%A Petersen, Emily E.
%A Polen, Kara N. D.
%A Meaney-Delman, Dana
%A Ellington, Sascha R.
%A Oduyebo, Titilope
%A Cohn, Amanda
%A Oster, Alexandra M.
%A Russell, Kate
%A Kawwass, Jennifer F.
%A Karwowski, Mateusz P.
%A Powers, Ann M.
%A Bertolli, Jeanne
%A Brooks, John T.
%A Kissin, Dmitry
%A Villanueva, Julie
%A Mu?oz-Jordan, Jorge
%A Kuehnert, Matthew
%A Olson, Christine K.
%A Honein, Margaret A.
%A Rivera, Maria
%A Jamieson, Denise J.
%A Rasmussen, Sonja A.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
%D 2016
%8 April 01
%V 65
%N 12
%@ 1545-861X
%G eng
%F Petersen2016
%X CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for women of reproductive age with possible Zika virus exposure to include recommendations on counseling women and men with possible Zika virus exposure who are interested in conceiving. This guidance is based on limited available data on persistence of Zika virus RNA in blood and semen. Women who have Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after symptom onset to attempt conception, and men with Zika virus disease should wait at least 6 months after symptom onset to attempt conception. Women and men with possible exposure to Zika virus but without clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after exposure to attempt conception. Possible exposure to Zika virus is defined as travel to or residence in an area of active Zika virus transmission ( http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html), or sex (vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, or fellatio) without a condom with a man who traveled to or resided in an area of active transmission. Women and men who reside in areas of active Zika virus transmission should talk with their health care provider about attempting conception. This guidance also provides updated recommendations on testing of pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure. These recommendations will be updated when additional data become available.
%K Adolescent
%K Adult
%K Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
%K Diagnostic Tests, Routine
%K Directive Counseling
%K Disease Outbreaks
%K Female
%K Health Personnel
%K Humans
%K Infertility, Female
%K Male
%K Mass Screening
%K Practice Guidelines as Topic
%K Preconception Care
%K Pregnancy
%K Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
%K Residence Characteristics
%K Travel
%K United States
%K Young Adult
%K Zika Virus Infection
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6512e2
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27031943
%P 315-322

PT Journal
AU Petersen, EE
   Polen, KND
   Meaney-Delman, D
   Ellington, SR
   Oduyebo, T
   Cohn, A
   Oster, AM
   Russell, K
   Kawwass, JF
   Karwowski, MP
   Powers, AM
   Bertolli, J
   Brooks, JT
   Kissin, D
   Villanueva, J
   Mu?oz-Jordan, J
   Kuehnert, M
   Olson, CK
   Honein, MA
   Rivera, M
   Jamieson, DJ
   Rasmussen, SA
TI Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure--United States, 2016.
SO MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JI MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
PD 04
PY 2016
BP 315
EP 322
VL 65
IS 12
DI 10.15585/mmwr.mm6512e2
LA eng
DE Adolescent; Adult; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.); Diagnostic Tests, Routine; Directive Counseling; Disease Outbreaks; Female; Health Personnel; Humans; Infertility, Female; Male; Mass Screening; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Preconception Care; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications, Infectious; Residence Characteristics; Travel; United States; Young Adult; Zika Virus Infection
AB CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for women of reproductive age with possible Zika virus exposure to include recommendations on counseling women and men with possible Zika virus exposure who are interested in conceiving. This guidance is based on limited available data on persistence of Zika virus RNA in blood and semen. Women who have Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after symptom onset to attempt conception, and men with Zika virus disease should wait at least 6 months after symptom onset to attempt conception. Women and men with possible exposure to Zika virus but without clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after exposure to attempt conception. Possible exposure to Zika virus is defined as travel to or residence in an area of active Zika virus transmission ( http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html), or sex (vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, or fellatio) without a condom with a man who traveled to or resided in an area of active transmission. Women and men who reside in areas of active Zika virus transmission should talk with their health care provider about attempting conception. This guidance also provides updated recommendations on testing of pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure. These recommendations will be updated when additional data become available.
ER

PMID- 27031943
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20160401
DCOM- 20160804
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 65
IP  - 12
DP  - 2016
TI  - Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Women of
      Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure--United States, 2016.
PG  - 315-22
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6512e2 [doi]
AB  - CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for
      women of reproductive age with possible Zika virus exposure to include
      recommendations on counseling women and men with possible Zika virus exposure who
      are interested in conceiving. This guidance is based on limited available data on
      persistence of Zika virus RNA in blood and semen. Women who have Zika virus
      disease should wait at least 8 weeks after symptom onset to attempt conception,
      and men with Zika virus disease should wait at least 6 months after symptom onset
      to attempt conception. Women and men with possible exposure to Zika virus but
      without clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease should wait at least 
      8 weeks after exposure to attempt conception. Possible exposure to Zika virus is 
      defined as travel to or residence in an area of active Zika virus transmission ( 
      http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html), or sex (vaginal intercourse, 
      anal intercourse, or fellatio) without a condom with a man who traveled to or
      resided in an area of active transmission. Women and men who reside in areas of
      active Zika virus transmission should talk with their health care provider about 
      attempting conception. This guidance also provides updated recommendations on
      testing of pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure. These
      recommendations will be updated when additional data become available.
FAU - Petersen, Emily E
AU  - Petersen EE
FAU - Polen, Kara N D
AU  - Polen KN
FAU - Meaney-Delman, Dana
AU  - Meaney-Delman D
FAU - Ellington, Sascha R
AU  - Ellington SR
FAU - Oduyebo, Titilope
AU  - Oduyebo T
FAU - Cohn, Amanda
AU  - Cohn A
FAU - Oster, Alexandra M
AU  - Oster AM
FAU - Russell, Kate
AU  - Russell K
FAU - Kawwass, Jennifer F
AU  - Kawwass JF
FAU - Karwowski, Mateusz P
AU  - Karwowski MP
FAU - Powers, Ann M
AU  - Powers AM
FAU - Bertolli, Jeanne
AU  - Bertolli J
FAU - Brooks, John T
AU  - Brooks JT
FAU - Kissin, Dmitry
AU  - Kissin D
FAU - Villanueva, Julie
AU  - Villanueva J
FAU - Munoz-Jordan, Jorge
AU  - Munoz-Jordan J
FAU - Kuehnert, Matthew
AU  - Kuehnert M
FAU - Olson, Christine K
AU  - Olson CK
FAU - Honein, Margaret A
AU  - Honein MA
FAU - Rivera, Maria
AU  - Rivera M
FAU - Jamieson, Denise J
AU  - Jamieson DJ
FAU - Rasmussen, Sonja A
AU  - Rasmussen SA
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160401
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
MH  - Diagnostic Tests, Routine/standards
MH  - Directive Counseling/standards
MH  - Disease Outbreaks/*prevention & control
MH  - Female
MH  - *Health Personnel
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infertility, Female/therapy
MH  - Male
MH  - Mass Screening/standards
MH  - *Practice Guidelines as Topic
MH  - Preconception Care/standards
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control
MH  - Residence Characteristics/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Travel/statistics & numerical data
MH  - United States/epidemiology
MH  - Young Adult
MH  - Zika Virus Infection/*prevention & control/transmission
EDAT- 2016/04/01 06:00
MHDA- 2016/08/05 06:00
CRDT- 2016/04/01 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6512e2 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016 Apr 1;65(12):315-22. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6512e2.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<b:Sources SelectedStyle="" xmlns:b="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography"  xmlns="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography" >
<b:Source>
<b:Tag>Petersen2016</b:Tag>
<b:SourceType>ArticleInAPeriodical</b:SourceType>
<b:Year>2016</b:Year>
<b:Month>04</b:Month>
<b:Day>01</b:Day>
<b:PeriodicalName>MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report</b:PeriodicalName>
<b:Volume>65</b:Volume>
<b:Issue>12</b:Issue>
<b:Pages>315-322</b:Pages>
<b:Author>
<b:Author><b:NameList>
<b:Person><b:Last>Petersen</b:Last><b:First>Emily</b:First><b:Middle>E</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Polen</b:Last><b:First>Kara</b:First><b:Middle>N</b:Middle><b:Middle>D</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Meaney-Delman</b:Last><b:First>Dana</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Ellington</b:Last><b:First>Sascha</b:First><b:Middle>R</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Oduyebo</b:Last><b:First>Titilope</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Cohn</b:Last><b:First>Amanda</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Oster</b:Last><b:First>Alexandra</b:First><b:Middle>M</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Russell</b:Last><b:First>Kate</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Kawwass</b:Last><b:First>Jennifer</b:First><b:Middle>F</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Karwowski</b:Last><b:First>Mateusz</b:First><b:Middle>P</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Powers</b:Last><b:First>Ann</b:First><b:Middle>M</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Bertolli</b:Last><b:First>Jeanne</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Brooks</b:Last><b:First>John</b:First><b:Middle>T</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Kissin</b:Last><b:First>Dmitry</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Villanueva</b:Last><b:First>Julie</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Mu&#241;oz-Jordan</b:Last><b:First>Jorge</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Kuehnert</b:Last><b:First>Matthew</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Olson</b:Last><b:First>Christine</b:First><b:Middle>K</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Honein</b:Last><b:First>Margaret</b:First><b:Middle>A</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Rivera</b:Last><b:First>Maria</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Jamieson</b:Last><b:First>Denise</b:First><b:Middle>J</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Rasmussen</b:Last><b:First>Sonja</b:First><b:Middle>A</b:Middle></b:Person>
</b:NameList></b:Author>
</b:Author>
<b:Title>Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure--United States, 2016.</b:Title>
 <b:ShortTitle>MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.</b:ShortTitle>
<b:Comments>CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for women of reproductive age with possible Zika virus exposure to include recommendations on counseling women and men with possible Zika virus exposure who are interested in conceiving. This guidance is based on limited available data on persistence of Zika virus RNA in blood and semen. Women who have Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after symptom onset to attempt conception, and men with Zika virus disease should wait at least 6 months after symptom onset to attempt conception. Women and men with possible exposure to Zika virus but without clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after exposure to attempt conception. Possible exposure to Zika virus is defined as travel to or residence in an area of active Zika virus transmission ( http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html), or sex (vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, or fellatio) without a condom with a man who traveled to or resided in an area of active transmission. Women and men who reside in areas of active Zika virus transmission should talk with their health care provider about attempting conception. This guidance also provides updated recommendations on testing of pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure. These recommendations will be updated when additional data become available.</b:Comments>
</b:Source>
</b:Sources>