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Tuberculosis Among Temporary Visa Holders Working in the Tourism Industry - United States, 2012-2014.

Abstract Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious bacterial disease of global concern. During 2013, an estimated nine million incident TB cases occurred worldwide (1). The majority (82%) were diagnosed in 22 countries, including South Africa and the Philippines, where annual incidence was 860 TB cases per 100,000 persons and 292 TB cases per 100,000 persons, respectively (1). The 2013 TB incidence in the United States was three cases per 100,000 persons (2). Under the Immigration and Nationality Act, TB screening is required for persons seeking permanent residence in the United States (i.e., immigrants and refugees), but it is not routinely required for nonimmigrants who are issued temporary visas for school or work (3). A portion of the U.S. tourism industry relies on temporary visa holders to accommodate seasonal and fluctuating demand for service personnel (4). This report describes three foreign-born persons holding temporary visas who had infectious TB while working at tourist destinations in the United States during 2012-2014. Multiple factors, including dormitory-style housing, transient work patterns, and diagnostic delays might have contributed to increased opportunity for TB transmission. Clinicians in seasonally driven tourist destinations should be aware of the potential for imported TB disease in foreign-born seasonal workers and promptly report suspected cases to health officials.
PMID
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Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start
%A Weinberg, Meghan P.; Cherry, Cara; Lipnitz, Julie; Nienstadt, Linus; King-Todd, April; Haddad, Maryam B.; Russell, Michelle; Wong, David; Davidson, Peter; McFadden, Jevon; Miller, Corinne
%T Tuberculosis Among Temporary Visa Holders Working in the Tourism Industry - United States, 2012-2014.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, vol. 65, no. 11, pp. 279-281
%D 03/2016
%V 65
%N 11
%M eng
%B Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious bacterial disease of global concern. During 2013, an estimated nine million incident TB cases occurred worldwide (1). The majority (82%) were diagnosed in 22 countries, including South Africa and the Philippines, where annual incidence was 860 TB cases per 100,000 persons and 292 TB cases per 100,000 persons, respectively (1). The 2013 TB incidence in the United States was three cases per 100,000 persons (2). Under the Immigration and Nationality Act, TB screening is required for persons seeking permanent residence in the United States (i.e., immigrants and refugees), but it is not routinely required for nonimmigrants who are issued temporary visas for school or work (3). A portion of the U.S. tourism industry relies on temporary visa holders to accommodate seasonal and fluctuating demand for service personnel (4). This report describes three foreign-born persons holding temporary visas who had infectious TB while working at tourist destinations in the United States during 2012-2014. Multiple factors, including dormitory-style housing, transient work patterns, and diagnostic delays might have contributed to increased opportunity for TB transmission. Clinicians in seasonally driven tourist destinations should be aware of the potential for imported TB disease in foreign-born seasonal workers and promptly report suspected cases to health officials.
%K Adult, Emigration and Immigration, Employment, Female, Foreign Professional Personnel, Humans, Incidence, Industry, Male, Mass Screening, Middle Aged, Philippines, South Africa, Tuberculosis, United States, Young Adult
%P 279
%L 281
%Y 10.15585/mmwr.mm6511a3
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2016.......65..279W

@Article{Weinberg2016,
author="Weinberg, Meghan P.
and Cherry, Cara
and Lipnitz, Julie
and Nienstadt, Linus
and King-Todd, April
and Haddad, Maryam B.
and Russell, Michelle
and Wong, David
and Davidson, Peter
and McFadden, Jevon
and Miller, Corinne",
title="Tuberculosis Among Temporary Visa Holders Working in the Tourism Industry - United States, 2012-2014.",
journal="MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report",
year="2016",
month="Mar",
day="25",
volume="65",
number="11",
pages="279--281",
keywords="Adult",
keywords="Emigration and Immigration",
keywords="Employment",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Foreign Professional Personnel",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Incidence",
keywords="Industry",
keywords="Male",
keywords="Mass Screening",
keywords="Middle Aged",
keywords="Philippines",
keywords="South Africa",
keywords="Tuberculosis",
keywords="United States",
keywords="Young Adult",
abstract="Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious bacterial disease of global concern. During 2013, an estimated nine million incident TB cases occurred worldwide (1). The majority (82\%) were diagnosed in 22 countries, including South Africa and the Philippines, where annual incidence was 860 TB cases per 100,000 persons and 292 TB cases per 100,000 persons, respectively (1). The 2013 TB incidence in the United States was three cases per 100,000 persons (2). Under the Immigration and Nationality Act, TB screening is required for persons seeking permanent residence in the United States (i.e., immigrants and refugees), but it is not routinely required for nonimmigrants who are issued temporary visas for school or work (3). A portion of the U.S. tourism industry relies on temporary visa holders to accommodate seasonal and fluctuating demand for service personnel (4). This report describes three foreign-born persons holding temporary visas who had infectious TB while working at tourist destinations in the United States during 2012-2014. Multiple factors, including dormitory-style housing, transient work patterns, and diagnostic delays might have contributed to increased opportunity for TB transmission. Clinicians in seasonally driven tourist destinations should be aware of the potential for imported TB disease in foreign-born seasonal workers and promptly report suspected cases to health officials.",
issn="1545-861X",
doi="10.15585/mmwr.mm6511a3",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27010221",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Tuberculosis Among Temporary Visa Holders Working in the Tourism Industry - United States, 2012-2014.
%A Weinberg, Meghan P.
%A Cherry, Cara
%A Lipnitz, Julie
%A Nienstadt, Linus
%A King-Todd, April
%A Haddad, Maryam B.
%A Russell, Michelle
%A Wong, David
%A Davidson, Peter
%A McFadden, Jevon
%A Miller, Corinne
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
%D 2016
%8 March 25
%V 65
%N 11
%@ 1545-861X
%G eng
%F Weinberg2016
%X Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious bacterial disease of global concern. During 2013, an estimated nine million incident TB cases occurred worldwide (1). The majority (82%) were diagnosed in 22 countries, including South Africa and the Philippines, where annual incidence was 860 TB cases per 100,000 persons and 292 TB cases per 100,000 persons, respectively (1). The 2013 TB incidence in the United States was three cases per 100,000 persons (2). Under the Immigration and Nationality Act, TB screening is required for persons seeking permanent residence in the United States (i.e., immigrants and refugees), but it is not routinely required for nonimmigrants who are issued temporary visas for school or work (3). A portion of the U.S. tourism industry relies on temporary visa holders to accommodate seasonal and fluctuating demand for service personnel (4). This report describes three foreign-born persons holding temporary visas who had infectious TB while working at tourist destinations in the United States during 2012-2014. Multiple factors, including dormitory-style housing, transient work patterns, and diagnostic delays might have contributed to increased opportunity for TB transmission. Clinicians in seasonally driven tourist destinations should be aware of the potential for imported TB disease in foreign-born seasonal workers and promptly report suspected cases to health officials.
%K Adult
%K Emigration and Immigration
%K Employment
%K Female
%K Foreign Professional Personnel
%K Humans
%K Incidence
%K Industry
%K Male
%K Mass Screening
%K Middle Aged
%K Philippines
%K South Africa
%K Tuberculosis
%K United States
%K Young Adult
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6511a3
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27010221
%P 279-281

PT Journal
AU Weinberg, MP
   Cherry, C
   Lipnitz, J
   Nienstadt, L
   King-Todd, A
   Haddad, MB
   Russell, M
   Wong, D
   Davidson, P
   McFadden, J
   Miller, C
TI Tuberculosis Among Temporary Visa Holders Working in the Tourism Industry - United States, 2012-2014.
SO MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JI MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
PD 03
PY 2016
BP 279
EP 281
VL 65
IS 11
DI 10.15585/mmwr.mm6511a3
LA eng
DE Adult; Emigration and Immigration; Employment; Female; Foreign Professional Personnel; Humans; Incidence; Industry; Male; Mass Screening; Middle Aged; Philippines; South Africa; Tuberculosis; United States; Young Adult
AB Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious bacterial disease of global concern. During 2013, an estimated nine million incident TB cases occurred worldwide (1). The majority (82%) were diagnosed in 22 countries, including South Africa and the Philippines, where annual incidence was 860 TB cases per 100,000 persons and 292 TB cases per 100,000 persons, respectively (1). The 2013 TB incidence in the United States was three cases per 100,000 persons (2). Under the Immigration and Nationality Act, TB screening is required for persons seeking permanent residence in the United States (i.e., immigrants and refugees), but it is not routinely required for nonimmigrants who are issued temporary visas for school or work (3). A portion of the U.S. tourism industry relies on temporary visa holders to accommodate seasonal and fluctuating demand for service personnel (4). This report describes three foreign-born persons holding temporary visas who had infectious TB while working at tourist destinations in the United States during 2012-2014. Multiple factors, including dormitory-style housing, transient work patterns, and diagnostic delays might have contributed to increased opportunity for TB transmission. Clinicians in seasonally driven tourist destinations should be aware of the potential for imported TB disease in foreign-born seasonal workers and promptly report suspected cases to health officials.
ER

PMID- 27010221
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20160325
DCOM- 20160729
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 65
IP  - 11
DP  - 2016
TI  - Tuberculosis Among Temporary Visa Holders Working in the Tourism Industry -
      United States, 2012-2014.
PG  - 279-81
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6511a3 [doi]
AB  - Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious bacterial disease of global concern. During
      2013, an estimated nine million incident TB cases occurred worldwide (1). The
      majority (82%) were diagnosed in 22 countries, including South Africa and the
      Philippines, where annual incidence was 860 TB cases per 100,000 persons and 292 
      TB cases per 100,000 persons, respectively (1). The 2013 TB incidence in the
      United States was three cases per 100,000 persons (2). Under the Immigration and 
      Nationality Act, TB screening is required for persons seeking permanent residence
      in the United States (i.e., immigrants and refugees), but it is not routinely
      required for nonimmigrants who are issued temporary visas for school or work (3).
      A portion of the U.S. tourism industry relies on temporary visa holders to
      accommodate seasonal and fluctuating demand for service personnel (4). This
      report describes three foreign-born persons holding temporary visas who had
      infectious TB while working at tourist destinations in the United States during
      2012-2014. Multiple factors, including dormitory-style housing, transient work
      patterns, and diagnostic delays might have contributed to increased opportunity
      for TB transmission. Clinicians in seasonally driven tourist destinations should 
      be aware of the potential for imported TB disease in foreign-born seasonal
      workers and promptly report suspected cases to health officials.
FAU - Weinberg, Meghan P
AU  - Weinberg MP
FAU - Cherry, Cara
AU  - Cherry C
FAU - Lipnitz, Julie
AU  - Lipnitz J
FAU - Nienstadt, Linus
AU  - Nienstadt L
FAU - King-Todd, April
AU  - King-Todd A
FAU - Haddad, Maryam B
AU  - Haddad MB
FAU - Russell, Michelle
AU  - Russell M
FAU - Wong, David
AU  - Wong D
FAU - Davidson, Peter
AU  - Davidson P
FAU - McFadden, Jevon
AU  - McFadden J
FAU - Miller, Corinne
AU  - Miller C
LA  - eng
PT  - Case Reports
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160325
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Emigration and Immigration/legislation & jurisprudence
MH  - Employment/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - Female
MH  - Foreign Professional Personnel/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - Humans
MH  - Incidence
MH  - *Industry
MH  - Male
MH  - Mass Screening/legislation & jurisprudence
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Philippines/ethnology
MH  - South Africa/ethnology
MH  - Tuberculosis/*diagnosis/epidemiology
MH  - United States/epidemiology
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2016/03/25 06:00
MHDA- 2016/07/30 06:00
CRDT- 2016/03/25 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6511a3 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016 Mar 25;65(11):279-81. doi:
      10.15585/mmwr.mm6511a3.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Weinberg, Meghan P.
AU  - Cherry, Cara
AU  - Lipnitz, Julie
AU  - Nienstadt, Linus
AU  - King-Todd, April
AU  - Haddad, Maryam B.
AU  - Russell, Michelle
AU  - Wong, David
AU  - Davidson, Peter
AU  - McFadden, Jevon
AU  - Miller, Corinne
PY  - 2016/03/25
TI  - Tuberculosis Among Temporary Visa Holders Working in the Tourism Industry - United States, 2012-2014.
T2  - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
JO  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
SP  - 279
EP  - 281
VL  - 65
IS  - 11
KW  - Adult
KW  - Emigration and Immigration
KW  - Employment
KW  - Female
KW  - Foreign Professional Personnel
KW  - Humans
KW  - Incidence
KW  - Industry
KW  - Male
KW  - Mass Screening
KW  - Middle Aged
KW  - Philippines
KW  - South Africa
KW  - Tuberculosis
KW  - United States
KW  - Young Adult
N2  - Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious bacterial disease of global concern. During 2013, an estimated nine million incident TB cases occurred worldwide (1). The majority (82%) were diagnosed in 22 countries, including South Africa and the Philippines, where annual incidence was 860 TB cases per 100,000 persons and 292 TB cases per 100,000 persons, respectively (1). The 2013 TB incidence in the United States was three cases per 100,000 persons (2). Under the Immigration and Nationality Act, TB screening is required for persons seeking permanent residence in the United States (i.e., immigrants and refugees), but it is not routinely required for nonimmigrants who are issued temporary visas for school or work (3). A portion of the U.S. tourism industry relies on temporary visa holders to accommodate seasonal and fluctuating demand for service personnel (4). This report describes three foreign-born persons holding temporary visas who had infectious TB while working at tourist destinations in the United States during 2012-2014. Multiple factors, including dormitory-style housing, transient work patterns, and diagnostic delays might have contributed to increased opportunity for TB transmission. Clinicians in seasonally driven tourist destinations should be aware of the potential for imported TB disease in foreign-born seasonal workers and promptly report suspected cases to health officials.
SN  - 1545-861X
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6511a3
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27010221
ID  - Weinberg2016
ER  - 
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