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Revision to CDC's Zika Travel Notices: Minimal Likelihood for Mosquito-Borne Zika Virus Transmission at Elevations Above 2,000 Meters.

Abstract Since May 2015, when Zika virus, a flavivirus transmitted primarily by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, was reported in Brazil, the virus has rapidly spread across the Region of the Americas and the Caribbean. The association between maternal Zika virus infection and adverse fetal and reproductive outcomes, including microcephaly, prompted CDC to issue a Level 2 alert travel notice* for the 37 countries and U.S. territories (at the national and territorial level) that have reported recent Zika virus transmission as of March 11, 2016. In addition to mosquito bite precautions for all travelers, CDC advises that pregnant women postpone travel to affected countries and U.S. territories. Within a nation's borders, ecologic characteristics, which determine the distribution of mosquito vectors, can vary considerably. CDC conducted a spatial analysis, focusing on the probability of occurrence of Ae. aegypti, to support the demarcation for subnational travel alerts. Based on results of this analysis, travel that is limited to elevations higher than 2,000 m (6,562 ft) above sea level is considered to have minimal (approximately 1%) likelihood for mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission, even within countries reporting active transmission. Women who are pregnant should avoid travel to elevations <2,000 m in countries with active Zika virus transmission.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Altitude

Guidelines as Topic

Travel

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start
%A Cetron, Martin
%T Revision to CDC's Zika Travel Notices: Minimal Likelihood for Mosquito-Borne Zika Virus Transmission at Elevations Above 2,000 Meters.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, vol. 65, no. 10, pp. 267-268
%D 03/2016
%V 65
%N 10
%M eng
%B Since May 2015, when Zika virus, a flavivirus transmitted primarily by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, was reported in Brazil, the virus has rapidly spread across the Region of the Americas and the Caribbean. The association between maternal Zika virus infection and adverse fetal and reproductive outcomes, including microcephaly, prompted CDC to issue a Level 2 alert travel notice* for the 37 countries and U.S. territories (at the national and territorial level) that have reported recent Zika virus transmission as of March 11, 2016. In addition to mosquito bite precautions for all travelers, CDC advises that pregnant women postpone travel to affected countries and U.S. territories. Within a nation's borders, ecologic characteristics, which determine the distribution of mosquito vectors, can vary considerably. CDC conducted a spatial analysis, focusing on the probability of occurrence of Ae. aegypti, to support the demarcation for subnational travel alerts. Based on results of this analysis, travel that is limited to elevations higher than 2,000 m (6,562 ft) above sea level is considered to have minimal (approximately 1%) likelihood for mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission, even within countries reporting active transmission. Women who are pregnant should avoid travel to elevations <2,000 m in countries with active Zika virus transmission.
%K Altitude, Animals, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.), Culicidae, Female, Guidelines as Topic, Humans, Likelihood Functions, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Travel, United States, Zika Virus, Zika Virus Infection
%P 267
%L 268
%Y 10.15585/mmwr.mm6510e1
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2016.......65..267C

@Article{Cetron2016,
author="Cetron, Martin",
title="Revision to CDC's Zika Travel Notices: Minimal Likelihood for Mosquito-Borne Zika Virus Transmission at Elevations Above 2,000 Meters.",
journal="MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report",
year="2016",
month="Mar",
day="18",
volume="65",
number="10",
pages="267--268",
keywords="Altitude",
keywords="Animals",
keywords="Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)",
keywords="Culicidae",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Guidelines as Topic",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Likelihood Functions",
keywords="Pregnancy",
keywords="Pregnancy Complications, Infectious",
keywords="Travel",
keywords="United States",
keywords="Zika Virus",
keywords="Zika Virus Infection",
abstract="Since May 2015, when Zika virus, a flavivirus transmitted primarily by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, was reported in Brazil, the virus has rapidly spread across the Region of the Americas and the Caribbean. The association between maternal Zika virus infection and adverse fetal and reproductive outcomes, including microcephaly, prompted CDC to issue a Level 2 alert travel notice* for the 37 countries and U.S. territories (at the national and territorial level) that have reported recent Zika virus transmission as of March 11, 2016. In addition to mosquito bite precautions for all travelers, CDC advises that pregnant women postpone travel to affected countries and U.S. territories. Within a nation's borders, ecologic characteristics, which determine the distribution of mosquito vectors, can vary considerably. CDC conducted a spatial analysis, focusing on the probability of occurrence of Ae. aegypti, to support the demarcation for subnational travel alerts. Based on results of this analysis, travel that is limited to elevations higher than 2,000 m (6,562 ft) above sea level is considered to have minimal (approximately 1\%) likelihood for mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission, even within countries reporting active transmission. Women who are pregnant should avoid travel to elevations <2,000 m in countries with active Zika virus transmission.",
issn="1545-861X",
doi="10.15585/mmwr.mm6510e1",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26985965",
language="eng"
}


PT Journal
AU Cetron, M
TI Revision to CDC's Zika Travel Notices: Minimal Likelihood for Mosquito-Borne Zika Virus Transmission at Elevations Above 2,000 Meters.
SO MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JI MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
PD Mar
PY 2016
BP 267
EP 268
VL 65
IS 10
DI 10.15585/mmwr.mm6510e1
LA eng
DE Altitude; Animals; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.); Culicidae; Female; Guidelines as Topic; Humans; Likelihood Functions; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications, Infectious; Travel; United States; Zika Virus; Zika Virus Infection
AB Since May 2015, when Zika virus, a flavivirus transmitted primarily by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, was reported in Brazil, the virus has rapidly spread across the Region of the Americas and the Caribbean. The association between maternal Zika virus infection and adverse fetal and reproductive outcomes, including microcephaly, prompted CDC to issue a Level 2 alert travel notice* for the 37 countries and U.S. territories (at the national and territorial level) that have reported recent Zika virus transmission as of March 11, 2016. In addition to mosquito bite precautions for all travelers, CDC advises that pregnant women postpone travel to affected countries and U.S. territories. Within a nation's borders, ecologic characteristics, which determine the distribution of mosquito vectors, can vary considerably. CDC conducted a spatial analysis, focusing on the probability of occurrence of Ae. aegypti, to support the demarcation for subnational travel alerts. Based on results of this analysis, travel that is limited to elevations higher than 2,000 m (6,562 ft) above sea level is considered to have minimal (approximately 1%) likelihood for mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission, even within countries reporting active transmission. Women who are pregnant should avoid travel to elevations <2,000 m in countries with active Zika virus transmission.
ER

PMID- 26985965
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20160318
DCOM- 20160722
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 65
IP  - 10
DP  - 2016 Mar 18
TI  - Revision to CDC's Zika Travel Notices: Minimal Likelihood for Mosquito-Borne Zika
      Virus Transmission at Elevations Above 2,000 Meters.
PG  - 267-8
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6510e1 [doi]
AB  - Since May 2015, when Zika virus, a flavivirus transmitted primarily by Aedes
      aegypti mosquitoes, was reported in Brazil, the virus has rapidly spread across
      the Region of the Americas and the Caribbean. The association between maternal
      Zika virus infection and adverse fetal and reproductive outcomes, including
      microcephaly, prompted CDC to issue a Level 2 alert travel notice* for the 37
      countries and U.S. territories (at the national and territorial level) that have 
      reported recent Zika virus transmission as of March 11, 2016. In addition to
      mosquito bite precautions for all travelers, CDC advises that pregnant women
      postpone travel to affected countries and U.S. territories. Within a nation's
      borders, ecologic characteristics, which determine the distribution of mosquito
      vectors, can vary considerably. CDC conducted a spatial analysis, focusing on the
      probability of occurrence of Ae. aegypti, to support the demarcation for
      subnational travel alerts. Based on results of this analysis, travel that is
      limited to elevations higher than 2,000 m (6,562 ft) above sea level is
      considered to have minimal (approximately 1%) likelihood for mosquito-borne Zika 
      virus transmission, even within countries reporting active transmission. Women
      who are pregnant should avoid travel to elevations &lt;2,000 m in countries with
      active Zika virus transmission.
FAU - Cetron, Martin
AU  - Cetron M
AD  - Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, National Center for Emerging and
      Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160318
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - *Altitude
MH  - Animals
MH  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
MH  - Culicidae/virology
MH  - Female
MH  - *Guidelines as Topic
MH  - Humans
MH  - Likelihood Functions
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention &amp; control
MH  - *Travel
MH  - United States
MH  - Zika Virus/isolation &amp; purification
MH  - Zika Virus Infection/*prevention &amp; control/*transmission
EDAT- 2016/03/18 06:00
MHDA- 2016/07/23 06:00
CRDT- 2016/03/18 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6510e1 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016 Mar 18;65(10):267-8. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6510e1.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Cetron, Martin
PY  - 2016/Mar/18
TI  - Revision to CDC's Zika Travel Notices: Minimal Likelihood for Mosquito-Borne Zika Virus Transmission at Elevations Above 2,000 Meters.
T2  - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
JO  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
SP  - 267
EP  - 268
VL  - 65
IS  - 10
KW  - Altitude
KW  - Animals
KW  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
KW  - Culicidae
KW  - Female
KW  - Guidelines as Topic
KW  - Humans
KW  - Likelihood Functions
KW  - Pregnancy
KW  - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
KW  - Travel
KW  - United States
KW  - Zika Virus
KW  - Zika Virus Infection
N2  - Since May 2015, when Zika virus, a flavivirus transmitted primarily by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, was reported in Brazil, the virus has rapidly spread across the Region of the Americas and the Caribbean. The association between maternal Zika virus infection and adverse fetal and reproductive outcomes, including microcephaly, prompted CDC to issue a Level 2 alert travel notice* for the 37 countries and U.S. territories (at the national and territorial level) that have reported recent Zika virus transmission as of March 11, 2016. In addition to mosquito bite precautions for all travelers, CDC advises that pregnant women postpone travel to affected countries and U.S. territories. Within a nation's borders, ecologic characteristics, which determine the distribution of mosquito vectors, can vary considerably. CDC conducted a spatial analysis, focusing on the probability of occurrence of Ae. aegypti, to support the demarcation for subnational travel alerts. Based on results of this analysis, travel that is limited to elevations higher than 2,000 m (6,562 ft) above sea level is considered to have minimal (approximately 1%) likelihood for mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission, even within countries reporting active transmission. Women who are pregnant should avoid travel to elevations <2,000 m in countries with active Zika virus transmission.
SN  - 1545-861X
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6510e1
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26985965
ID  - Cetron2016
ER  - 
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