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Notes from the Field: Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Meningoencephalitis from a Household Rodent Infestation - Minnesota, 2015.

Abstract On April 20, 2015, a female aged 15 years sought care at her pediatrician's office after 5 days of fever, myalgia, left parietal headache, and photophobia. A rapid influenza assay was negative, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate and total white blood cell count were normal. She improved with symptomatic care at home, but returned to her pediatrician's office on April 28, reporting recurrence of her headache and photophobia and new onset of a stiff neck. She was admitted to the hospital, where she was febrile to 102.9?F (39.4?C) and had meningismus. Computed tomography scan of her head was normal, and a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed a markedly elevated white blood cell count with 68% lymphocytes, low glucose, and a negative Gram stain. She was treated empirically for both bacterial and herpes simplex virus meningitis. The patient's hospital course was notable for hypotension (blood pressure 81/50), irritability, and pancreatitis with a peak lipase of 8,627 U/L. CSF cultures yielded no growth, and CSF polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for herpes simplex virus was negative. Nucleic acid amplification testing, acid-fast bacilli stain, and acid-fast bacilli cultures of CSF were negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Results of investigations for human immunodeficiency virus, syphilis, Lyme disease, human herpesvirus 6 and 7, and species of Babesia, Toxoplasma, Histoplasma, Cryptococcus, Blastomyces, and Brucella were negative. She recovered and was discharged on hospital day 11 with no apparent sequelae.
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start
%A Talley, Pamela; Holzbauer, Stacy; Smith, Kirk; Pomputius, William
%T Notes from the Field: Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Meningoencephalitis from a Household Rodent Infestation - Minnesota, 2015.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, vol. 65, no. 9, pp. 248-249
%D 03/2016
%V 65
%N 9
%M eng
%B On April 20, 2015, a female aged 15 years sought care at her pediatrician's office after 5 days of fever, myalgia, left parietal headache, and photophobia. A rapid influenza assay was negative, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate and total white blood cell count were normal. She improved with symptomatic care at home, but returned to her pediatrician's office on April 28, reporting recurrence of her headache and photophobia and new onset of a stiff neck. She was admitted to the hospital, where she was febrile to 102.9?F (39.4?C) and had meningismus. Computed tomography scan of her head was normal, and a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed a markedly elevated white blood cell count with 68% lymphocytes, low glucose, and a negative Gram stain. She was treated empirically for both bacterial and herpes simplex virus meningitis. The patient's hospital course was notable for hypotension (blood pressure 81/50), irritability, and pancreatitis with a peak lipase of 8,627 U/L. CSF cultures yielded no growth, and CSF polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for herpes simplex virus was negative. Nucleic acid amplification testing, acid-fast bacilli stain, and acid-fast bacilli cultures of CSF were negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Results of investigations for human immunodeficiency virus, syphilis, Lyme disease, human herpesvirus 6 and 7, and species of Babesia, Toxoplasma, Histoplasma, Cryptococcus, Blastomyces, and Brucella were negative. She recovered and was discharged on hospital day 11 with no apparent sequelae.
%K Adolescent, Animals, Feces, Female, Housing, Humans, Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, Meningoencephalitis, Minnesota, Rodent Control, Rodent Diseases, Rodentia
%P 248
%L 249
%Y 10.15585/mmwr.mm6509a4
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2016.......65..248T

@Article{Talley2016,
author="Talley, Pamela
and Holzbauer, Stacy
and Smith, Kirk
and Pomputius, William",
title="Notes from the Field: Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Meningoencephalitis from a Household Rodent Infestation - Minnesota, 2015.",
journal="MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report",
year="2016",
month="Mar",
day="11",
volume="65",
number="9",
pages="248--249",
keywords="Adolescent",
keywords="Animals",
keywords="Feces",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Housing",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus",
keywords="Meningoencephalitis",
keywords="Minnesota",
keywords="Rodent Control",
keywords="Rodent Diseases",
keywords="Rodentia",
abstract="On April 20, 2015, a female aged 15 years sought care at her pediatrician's office after 5 days of fever, myalgia, left parietal headache, and photophobia. A rapid influenza assay was negative, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate and total white blood cell count were normal. She improved with symptomatic care at home, but returned to her pediatrician's office on April 28, reporting recurrence of her headache and photophobia and new onset of a stiff neck. She was admitted to the hospital, where she was febrile to 102.9{\textdegree}F (39.4{\textdegree}C) and had meningismus. Computed tomography scan of her head was normal, and a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed a markedly elevated white blood cell count with 68\% lymphocytes, low glucose, and a negative Gram stain. She was treated empirically for both bacterial and herpes simplex virus meningitis. The patient's hospital course was notable for hypotension (blood pressure 81/50), irritability, and pancreatitis with a peak lipase of 8,627 U/L. CSF cultures yielded no growth, and CSF polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for herpes simplex virus was negative. Nucleic acid amplification testing, acid-fast bacilli stain, and acid-fast bacilli cultures of CSF were negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Results of investigations for human immunodeficiency virus, syphilis, Lyme disease, human herpesvirus 6 and 7, and species of Babesia, Toxoplasma, Histoplasma, Cryptococcus, Blastomyces, and Brucella were negative. She recovered and was discharged on hospital day 11 with no apparent sequelae.",
issn="1545-861X",
doi="10.15585/mmwr.mm6509a4",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26963688",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Notes from the Field: Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Meningoencephalitis from a Household Rodent Infestation - Minnesota, 2015.
%A Talley, Pamela
%A Holzbauer, Stacy
%A Smith, Kirk
%A Pomputius, William
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
%D 2016
%8 Mar 11
%V 65
%N 9
%@ 1545-861X
%G eng
%F Talley2016
%X On April 20, 2015, a female aged 15 years sought care at her pediatrician's office after 5 days of fever, myalgia, left parietal headache, and photophobia. A rapid influenza assay was negative, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate and total white blood cell count were normal. She improved with symptomatic care at home, but returned to her pediatrician's office on April 28, reporting recurrence of her headache and photophobia and new onset of a stiff neck. She was admitted to the hospital, where she was febrile to 102.9?F (39.4?C) and had meningismus. Computed tomography scan of her head was normal, and a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed a markedly elevated white blood cell count with 68% lymphocytes, low glucose, and a negative Gram stain. She was treated empirically for both bacterial and herpes simplex virus meningitis. The patient's hospital course was notable for hypotension (blood pressure 81/50), irritability, and pancreatitis with a peak lipase of 8,627 U/L. CSF cultures yielded no growth, and CSF polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for herpes simplex virus was negative. Nucleic acid amplification testing, acid-fast bacilli stain, and acid-fast bacilli cultures of CSF were negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Results of investigations for human immunodeficiency virus, syphilis, Lyme disease, human herpesvirus 6 and 7, and species of Babesia, Toxoplasma, Histoplasma, Cryptococcus, Blastomyces, and Brucella were negative. She recovered and was discharged on hospital day 11 with no apparent sequelae.
%K Adolescent
%K Animals
%K Feces
%K Female
%K Housing
%K Humans
%K Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus
%K Meningoencephalitis
%K Minnesota
%K Rodent Control
%K Rodent Diseases
%K Rodentia
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6509a4
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26963688
%P 248-249

PT Journal
AU Talley, P
   Holzbauer, S
   Smith, K
   Pomputius, W
TI Notes from the Field: Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Meningoencephalitis from a Household Rodent Infestation - Minnesota, 2015.
SO MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JI MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
PD Mar
PY 2016
BP 248
EP 249
VL 65
IS 9
DI 10.15585/mmwr.mm6509a4
LA eng
DE Adolescent; Animals; Feces; Female; Housing; Humans; Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus; Meningoencephalitis; Minnesota; Rodent Control; Rodent Diseases; Rodentia
AB On April 20, 2015, a female aged 15 years sought care at her pediatrician's office after 5 days of fever, myalgia, left parietal headache, and photophobia. A rapid influenza assay was negative, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate and total white blood cell count were normal. She improved with symptomatic care at home, but returned to her pediatrician's office on April 28, reporting recurrence of her headache and photophobia and new onset of a stiff neck. She was admitted to the hospital, where she was febrile to 102.9?F (39.4?C) and had meningismus. Computed tomography scan of her head was normal, and a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed a markedly elevated white blood cell count with 68% lymphocytes, low glucose, and a negative Gram stain. She was treated empirically for both bacterial and herpes simplex virus meningitis. The patient's hospital course was notable for hypotension (blood pressure 81/50), irritability, and pancreatitis with a peak lipase of 8,627 U/L. CSF cultures yielded no growth, and CSF polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for herpes simplex virus was negative. Nucleic acid amplification testing, acid-fast bacilli stain, and acid-fast bacilli cultures of CSF were negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Results of investigations for human immunodeficiency virus, syphilis, Lyme disease, human herpesvirus 6 and 7, and species of Babesia, Toxoplasma, Histoplasma, Cryptococcus, Blastomyces, and Brucella were negative. She recovered and was discharged on hospital day 11 with no apparent sequelae.
ER

PMID- 26963688
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20160311
DCOM- 20160715
LR  - 20160728
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 65
IP  - 9
DP  - 2016 Mar 11
TI  - Notes from the Field: Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Meningoencephalitis from
      a Household Rodent Infestation - Minnesota, 2015.
PG  - 248-9
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6509a4 [doi]
AB  - On April 20, 2015, a female aged 15 years sought care at her pediatrician's
      office after 5 days of fever, myalgia, left parietal headache, and photophobia. A
      rapid influenza assay was negative, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate and total 
      white blood cell count were normal. She improved with symptomatic care at home,
      but returned to her pediatrician's office on April 28, reporting recurrence of
      her headache and photophobia and new onset of a stiff neck. She was admitted to
      the hospital, where she was febrile to 102.9 degrees F (39.4 degrees C) and had
      meningismus. Computed tomography scan of her head was normal, and a cerebrospinal
      fluid (CSF) analysis showed a markedly elevated white blood cell count with 68%
      lymphocytes, low glucose, and a negative Gram stain. She was treated empirically 
      for both bacterial and herpes simplex virus meningitis. The patient's hospital
      course was notable for hypotension (blood pressure 81/50), irritability, and
      pancreatitis with a peak lipase of 8,627 U/L. CSF cultures yielded no growth, and
      CSF polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for herpes simplex virus was
      negative. Nucleic acid amplification testing, acid-fast bacilli stain, and
      acid-fast bacilli cultures of CSF were negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
      Results of investigations for human immunodeficiency virus, syphilis, Lyme
      disease, human herpesvirus 6 and 7, and species of Babesia, Toxoplasma,
      Histoplasma, Cryptococcus, Blastomyces, and Brucella were negative. She recovered
      and was discharged on hospital day 11 with no apparent sequelae.
FAU - Talley, Pamela
AU  - Talley P
FAU - Holzbauer, Stacy
AU  - Holzbauer S
FAU - Smith, Kirk
AU  - Smith K
FAU - Pomputius, William
AU  - Pomputius W
LA  - eng
PT  - Case Reports
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160311
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
EIN - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016;65(11):295. PMID: 27010589
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Animals
MH  - Feces/virology
MH  - Female
MH  - Housing
MH  - Humans
MH  - *Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus/isolation & purification
MH  - Meningoencephalitis/*diagnosis/*virology
MH  - Minnesota
MH  - Rodent Control
MH  - Rodent Diseases/*virology
MH  - Rodentia
EDAT- 2016/03/11 06:00
MHDA- 2016/07/16 06:00
CRDT- 2016/03/11 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6509a4 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016 Mar 11;65(9):248-9. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6509a4.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Talley, Pamela
AU  - Holzbauer, Stacy
AU  - Smith, Kirk
AU  - Pomputius, William
PY  - 2016/Mar/11
TI  - Notes from the Field: Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Meningoencephalitis from a Household Rodent Infestation - Minnesota, 2015.
T2  - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
JO  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
SP  - 248
EP  - 249
VL  - 65
IS  - 9
KW  - Adolescent
KW  - Animals
KW  - Feces
KW  - Female
KW  - Housing
KW  - Humans
KW  - Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus
KW  - Meningoencephalitis
KW  - Minnesota
KW  - Rodent Control
KW  - Rodent Diseases
KW  - Rodentia
N2  - On April 20, 2015, a female aged 15 years sought care at her pediatrician's office after 5 days of fever, myalgia, left parietal headache, and photophobia. A rapid influenza assay was negative, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate and total white blood cell count were normal. She improved with symptomatic care at home, but returned to her pediatrician's office on April 28, reporting recurrence of her headache and photophobia and new onset of a stiff neck. She was admitted to the hospital, where she was febrile to 102.9?F (39.4?C) and had meningismus. Computed tomography scan of her head was normal, and a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed a markedly elevated white blood cell count with 68% lymphocytes, low glucose, and a negative Gram stain. She was treated empirically for both bacterial and herpes simplex virus meningitis. The patient's hospital course was notable for hypotension (blood pressure 81/50), irritability, and pancreatitis with a peak lipase of 8,627 U/L. CSF cultures yielded no growth, and CSF polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for herpes simplex virus was negative. Nucleic acid amplification testing, acid-fast bacilli stain, and acid-fast bacilli cultures of CSF were negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Results of investigations for human immunodeficiency virus, syphilis, Lyme disease, human herpesvirus 6 and 7, and species of Babesia, Toxoplasma, Histoplasma, Cryptococcus, Blastomyces, and Brucella were negative. She recovered and was discharged on hospital day 11 with no apparent sequelae.
SN  - 1545-861X
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6509a4
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26963688
ID  - Talley2016
ER  - 
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