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Zika Virus Infection Among U.S. Pregnant Travelers - August 2015-February 2016.

Abstract After reports of microcephaly and other adverse pregnancy outcomes in infants of mothers infected with Zika virus during pregnancy, CDC issued a travel alert on January 15, 2016, advising pregnant women to consider postponing travel to areas with active transmission of Zika virus. On January 19, CDC released interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with travel to an affected area, and an update was released on February 5. As of February 17, CDC had received reports of nine pregnant travelers with laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease; 10 additional reports of Zika virus disease among pregnant women are currently under investigation. No Zika virus-related hospitalizations or deaths among pregnant women were reported. Pregnancy outcomes among the nine confirmed cases included two early pregnancy losses, two elective terminations, and three live births (two apparently healthy infants and one infant with severe microcephaly); two pregnancies (approximately 18 weeks' and 34 weeks' gestation) are continuing without known complications. Confirmed cases of Zika virus infection were reported among women who had traveled to one or more of the following nine areas with ongoing local transmission of Zika virus: American Samoa, Brazil, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Samoa. This report summarizes findings from the nine women with confirmed Zika virus infection during pregnancy, including case reports for four women with various clinical outcomes. U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure during pregnancy should follow CDC guidelines for patient evaluation and management. Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition. CDC has developed a voluntary registry to collect information about U.S. pregnant women with confirmed Zika virus infection and their infants. Information about the registry is in preparation and will be available on the CDC website.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Travel

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start
%A Meaney-Delman, Dana; Hills, Susan L.; Williams, Charnetta; Galang, Romeo R.; Iyengar, Preetha; Hennenfent, Andrew K.; Rabe, Ingrid B.; Panella, Amanda; Oduyebo, Titilope; Honein, Margaret A.; Zaki, Sherif; Lindsey, Nicole; Lehman, Jennifer A.; Kwit, Natalie; Bertolli, Jeanne; Ellington, Sascha; Igbinosa, Irogue; Minta, Anna A.; Petersen, Emily E.; Mead, Paul; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Jamieson, Denise J.
%T Zika Virus Infection Among U.S. Pregnant Travelers - August 2015-February 2016.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, vol. 65, no. 8, pp. 211-214
%D 03/2016
%V 65
%N 8
%M eng
%B After reports of microcephaly and other adverse pregnancy outcomes in infants of mothers infected with Zika virus during pregnancy, CDC issued a travel alert on January 15, 2016, advising pregnant women to consider postponing travel to areas with active transmission of Zika virus. On January 19, CDC released interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with travel to an affected area, and an update was released on February 5. As of February 17, CDC had received reports of nine pregnant travelers with laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease; 10 additional reports of Zika virus disease among pregnant women are currently under investigation. No Zika virus-related hospitalizations or deaths among pregnant women were reported. Pregnancy outcomes among the nine confirmed cases included two early pregnancy losses, two elective terminations, and three live births (two apparently healthy infants and one infant with severe microcephaly); two pregnancies (approximately 18 weeks' and 34 weeks' gestation) are continuing without known complications. Confirmed cases of Zika virus infection were reported among women who had traveled to one or more of the following nine areas with ongoing local transmission of Zika virus: American Samoa, Brazil, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Samoa. This report summarizes findings from the nine women with confirmed Zika virus infection during pregnancy, including case reports for four women with various clinical outcomes. U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure during pregnancy should follow CDC guidelines for patient evaluation and management. Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition. CDC has developed a voluntary registry to collect information about U.S. pregnant women with confirmed Zika virus infection and their infants. Information about the registry is in preparation and will be available on the CDC website.
%K Adult, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.), Female, Guidelines as Topic, Humans, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Travel, United States, Zika Virus, Zika Virus Infection
%P 211
%L 214
%Y 10.15585/mmwr.mm6508e1
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2016.......65..211M

@Article{Meaney-Delman2016,
author="Meaney-Delman, Dana
and Hills, Susan L.
and Williams, Charnetta
and Galang, Romeo R.
and Iyengar, Preetha
and Hennenfent, Andrew K.
and Rabe, Ingrid B.
and Panella, Amanda
and Oduyebo, Titilope
and Honein, Margaret A.
and Zaki, Sherif
and Lindsey, Nicole
and Lehman, Jennifer A.
and Kwit, Natalie
and Bertolli, Jeanne
and Ellington, Sascha
and Igbinosa, Irogue
and Minta, Anna A.
and Petersen, Emily E.
and Mead, Paul
and Rasmussen, Sonja A.
and Jamieson, Denise J.",
title="Zika Virus Infection Among U.S. Pregnant Travelers - August 2015-February 2016.",
journal="MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report",
year="2016",
month="Mar",
day="04",
volume="65",
number="8",
pages="211--214",
keywords="Adult",
keywords="Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Guidelines as Topic",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Pregnancy",
keywords="Pregnancy Complications, Infectious",
keywords="Travel",
keywords="United States",
keywords="Zika Virus",
keywords="Zika Virus Infection",
abstract="After reports of microcephaly and other adverse pregnancy outcomes in infants of mothers infected with Zika virus during pregnancy, CDC issued a travel alert on January 15, 2016, advising pregnant women to consider postponing travel to areas with active transmission of Zika virus. On January 19, CDC released interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with travel to an affected area, and an update was released on February 5. As of February 17, CDC had received reports of nine pregnant travelers with laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease; 10 additional reports of Zika virus disease among pregnant women are currently under investigation. No Zika virus-related hospitalizations or deaths among pregnant women were reported. Pregnancy outcomes among the nine confirmed cases included two early pregnancy losses, two elective terminations, and three live births (two apparently healthy infants and one infant with severe microcephaly); two pregnancies (approximately 18 weeks' and 34 weeks' gestation) are continuing without known complications. Confirmed cases of Zika virus infection were reported among women who had traveled to one or more of the following nine areas with ongoing local transmission of Zika virus: American Samoa, Brazil, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Samoa. This report summarizes findings from the nine women with confirmed Zika virus infection during pregnancy, including case reports for four women with various clinical outcomes. U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure during pregnancy should follow CDC guidelines for patient evaluation and management. Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition. CDC has developed a voluntary registry to collect information about U.S. pregnant women with confirmed Zika virus infection and their infants. Information about the registry is in preparation and will be available on the CDC website.",
issn="1545-861X",
doi="10.15585/mmwr.mm6508e1",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26938703",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Zika Virus Infection Among U.S. Pregnant Travelers - August 2015-February 2016.
%A Meaney-Delman, Dana
%A Hills, Susan L.
%A Williams, Charnetta
%A Galang, Romeo R.
%A Iyengar, Preetha
%A Hennenfent, Andrew K.
%A Rabe, Ingrid B.
%A Panella, Amanda
%A Oduyebo, Titilope
%A Honein, Margaret A.
%A Zaki, Sherif
%A Lindsey, Nicole
%A Lehman, Jennifer A.
%A Kwit, Natalie
%A Bertolli, Jeanne
%A Ellington, Sascha
%A Igbinosa, Irogue
%A Minta, Anna A.
%A Petersen, Emily E.
%A Mead, Paul
%A Rasmussen, Sonja A.
%A Jamieson, Denise J.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
%D 2016
%8 Mar 04
%V 65
%N 8
%@ 1545-861X
%G eng
%F Meaney-Delman2016
%X After reports of microcephaly and other adverse pregnancy outcomes in infants of mothers infected with Zika virus during pregnancy, CDC issued a travel alert on January 15, 2016, advising pregnant women to consider postponing travel to areas with active transmission of Zika virus. On January 19, CDC released interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with travel to an affected area, and an update was released on February 5. As of February 17, CDC had received reports of nine pregnant travelers with laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease; 10 additional reports of Zika virus disease among pregnant women are currently under investigation. No Zika virus-related hospitalizations or deaths among pregnant women were reported. Pregnancy outcomes among the nine confirmed cases included two early pregnancy losses, two elective terminations, and three live births (two apparently healthy infants and one infant with severe microcephaly); two pregnancies (approximately 18 weeks' and 34 weeks' gestation) are continuing without known complications. Confirmed cases of Zika virus infection were reported among women who had traveled to one or more of the following nine areas with ongoing local transmission of Zika virus: American Samoa, Brazil, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Samoa. This report summarizes findings from the nine women with confirmed Zika virus infection during pregnancy, including case reports for four women with various clinical outcomes. U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure during pregnancy should follow CDC guidelines for patient evaluation and management. Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition. CDC has developed a voluntary registry to collect information about U.S. pregnant women with confirmed Zika virus infection and their infants. Information about the registry is in preparation and will be available on the CDC website.
%K Adult
%K Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
%K Female
%K Guidelines as Topic
%K Humans
%K Pregnancy
%K Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
%K Travel
%K United States
%K Zika Virus
%K Zika Virus Infection
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6508e1
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26938703
%P 211-214

PT Journal
AU Meaney-Delman, D
   Hills, SL
   Williams, C
   Galang, RR
   Iyengar, P
   Hennenfent, AK
   Rabe, IB
   Panella, A
   Oduyebo, T
   Honein, MA
   Zaki, S
   Lindsey, N
   Lehman, JA
   Kwit, N
   Bertolli, J
   Ellington, S
   Igbinosa, I
   Minta, AA
   Petersen, EE
   Mead, P
   Rasmussen, SA
   Jamieson, DJ
TI Zika Virus Infection Among U.S. Pregnant Travelers - August 2015-February 2016.
SO MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JI MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
PD Mar
PY 2016
BP 211
EP 214
VL 65
IS 8
DI 10.15585/mmwr.mm6508e1
LA eng
DE Adult; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.); Female; Guidelines as Topic; Humans; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications, Infectious; Travel; United States; Zika Virus; Zika Virus Infection
AB After reports of microcephaly and other adverse pregnancy outcomes in infants of mothers infected with Zika virus during pregnancy, CDC issued a travel alert on January 15, 2016, advising pregnant women to consider postponing travel to areas with active transmission of Zika virus. On January 19, CDC released interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with travel to an affected area, and an update was released on February 5. As of February 17, CDC had received reports of nine pregnant travelers with laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease; 10 additional reports of Zika virus disease among pregnant women are currently under investigation. No Zika virus-related hospitalizations or deaths among pregnant women were reported. Pregnancy outcomes among the nine confirmed cases included two early pregnancy losses, two elective terminations, and three live births (two apparently healthy infants and one infant with severe microcephaly); two pregnancies (approximately 18 weeks' and 34 weeks' gestation) are continuing without known complications. Confirmed cases of Zika virus infection were reported among women who had traveled to one or more of the following nine areas with ongoing local transmission of Zika virus: American Samoa, Brazil, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Samoa. This report summarizes findings from the nine women with confirmed Zika virus infection during pregnancy, including case reports for four women with various clinical outcomes. U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure during pregnancy should follow CDC guidelines for patient evaluation and management. Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition. CDC has developed a voluntary registry to collect information about U.S. pregnant women with confirmed Zika virus infection and their infants. Information about the registry is in preparation and will be available on the CDC website.
ER

PMID- 26938703
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20160304
DCOM- 20160708
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 65
IP  - 8
DP  - 2016 Mar 4
TI  - Zika Virus Infection Among U.S. Pregnant Travelers - August 2015-February 2016.
PG  - 211-4
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6508e1 [doi]
AB  - After reports of microcephaly and other adverse pregnancy outcomes in infants of 
      mothers infected with Zika virus during pregnancy, CDC issued a travel alert on
      January 15, 2016, advising pregnant women to consider postponing travel to areas 
      with active transmission of Zika virus. On January 19, CDC released interim
      guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with travel
      to an affected area, and an update was released on February 5. As of February 17,
      CDC had received reports of nine pregnant travelers with laboratory-confirmed
      Zika virus disease; 10 additional reports of Zika virus disease among pregnant
      women are currently under investigation. No Zika virus-related hospitalizations
      or deaths among pregnant women were reported. Pregnancy outcomes among the nine
      confirmed cases included two early pregnancy losses, two elective terminations,
      and three live births (two apparently healthy infants and one infant with severe 
      microcephaly); two pregnancies (approximately 18 weeks' and 34 weeks' gestation) 
      are continuing without known complications. Confirmed cases of Zika virus
      infection were reported among women who had traveled to one or more of the
      following nine areas with ongoing local transmission of Zika virus: American
      Samoa, Brazil, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and 
      Samoa. This report summarizes findings from the nine women with confirmed Zika
      virus infection during pregnancy, including case reports for four women with
      various clinical outcomes. U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women
      with possible Zika virus exposure during pregnancy should follow CDC guidelines
      for patient evaluation and management. Zika virus disease is a nationally
      notifiable condition. CDC has developed a voluntary registry to collect
      information about U.S. pregnant women with confirmed Zika virus infection and
      their infants. Information about the registry is in preparation and will be
      available on the CDC website.
FAU - Meaney-Delman, Dana
AU  - Meaney-Delman D
FAU - Hills, Susan L
AU  - Hills SL
FAU - Williams, Charnetta
AU  - Williams C
FAU - Galang, Romeo R
AU  - Galang RR
FAU - Iyengar, Preetha
AU  - Iyengar P
FAU - Hennenfent, Andrew K
AU  - Hennenfent AK
FAU - Rabe, Ingrid B
AU  - Rabe IB
FAU - Panella, Amanda
AU  - Panella A
FAU - Oduyebo, Titilope
AU  - Oduyebo T
FAU - Honein, Margaret A
AU  - Honein MA
FAU - Zaki, Sherif
AU  - Zaki S
FAU - Lindsey, Nicole
AU  - Lindsey N
FAU - Lehman, Jennifer A
AU  - Lehman JA
FAU - Kwit, Natalie
AU  - Kwit N
FAU - Bertolli, Jeanne
AU  - Bertolli J
FAU - Ellington, Sascha
AU  - Ellington S
FAU - Igbinosa, Irogue
AU  - Igbinosa I
FAU - Minta, Anna A
AU  - Minta AA
FAU - Petersen, Emily E
AU  - Petersen EE
FAU - Mead, Paul
AU  - Mead P
FAU - Rasmussen, Sonja A
AU  - Rasmussen SA
FAU - Jamieson, Denise J
AU  - Jamieson DJ
LA  - eng
PT  - Case Reports
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160304
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
MH  - Female
MH  - Guidelines as Topic
MH  - Humans
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/*diagnosis
MH  - *Travel
MH  - United States
MH  - Zika Virus/*isolation & purification
MH  - Zika Virus Infection/*diagnosis/epidemiology
EDAT- 2016/03/05 06:00
MHDA- 2016/07/09 06:00
CRDT- 2016/03/04 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6508e1 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016 Mar 4;65(8):211-4. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6508e1.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Meaney-Delman, Dana
AU  - Hills, Susan L.
AU  - Williams, Charnetta
AU  - Galang, Romeo R.
AU  - Iyengar, Preetha
AU  - Hennenfent, Andrew K.
AU  - Rabe, Ingrid B.
AU  - Panella, Amanda
AU  - Oduyebo, Titilope
AU  - Honein, Margaret A.
AU  - Zaki, Sherif
AU  - Lindsey, Nicole
AU  - Lehman, Jennifer A.
AU  - Kwit, Natalie
AU  - Bertolli, Jeanne
AU  - Ellington, Sascha
AU  - Igbinosa, Irogue
AU  - Minta, Anna A.
AU  - Petersen, Emily E.
AU  - Mead, Paul
AU  - Rasmussen, Sonja A.
AU  - Jamieson, Denise J.
PY  - 2016/Mar/04
TI  - Zika Virus Infection Among U.S. Pregnant Travelers - August 2015-February 2016.
T2  - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
JO  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
SP  - 211
EP  - 214
VL  - 65
IS  - 8
KW  - Adult
KW  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
KW  - Female
KW  - Guidelines as Topic
KW  - Humans
KW  - Pregnancy
KW  - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
KW  - Travel
KW  - United States
KW  - Zika Virus
KW  - Zika Virus Infection
N2  - After reports of microcephaly and other adverse pregnancy outcomes in infants of mothers infected with Zika virus during pregnancy, CDC issued a travel alert on January 15, 2016, advising pregnant women to consider postponing travel to areas with active transmission of Zika virus. On January 19, CDC released interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with travel to an affected area, and an update was released on February 5. As of February 17, CDC had received reports of nine pregnant travelers with laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease; 10 additional reports of Zika virus disease among pregnant women are currently under investigation. No Zika virus-related hospitalizations or deaths among pregnant women were reported. Pregnancy outcomes among the nine confirmed cases included two early pregnancy losses, two elective terminations, and three live births (two apparently healthy infants and one infant with severe microcephaly); two pregnancies (approximately 18 weeks' and 34 weeks' gestation) are continuing without known complications. Confirmed cases of Zika virus infection were reported among women who had traveled to one or more of the following nine areas with ongoing local transmission of Zika virus: American Samoa, Brazil, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Samoa. This report summarizes findings from the nine women with confirmed Zika virus infection during pregnancy, including case reports for four women with various clinical outcomes. U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure during pregnancy should follow CDC guidelines for patient evaluation and management. Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition. CDC has developed a voluntary registry to collect information about U.S. pregnant women with confirmed Zika virus infection and their infants. Information about the registry is in preparation and will be available on the CDC website.
SN  - 1545-861X
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6508e1
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26938703
ID  - Meaney-Delman2016
ER  - 
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<b:Title>Zika Virus Infection Among U.S. Pregnant Travelers - August 2015-February 2016.</b:Title>
 <b:ShortTitle>MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.</b:ShortTitle>
<b:Comments>After reports of microcephaly and other adverse pregnancy outcomes in infants of mothers infected with Zika virus during pregnancy, CDC issued a travel alert on January 15, 2016, advising pregnant women to consider postponing travel to areas with active transmission of Zika virus. On January 19, CDC released interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with travel to an affected area, and an update was released on February 5. As of February 17, CDC had received reports of nine pregnant travelers with laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease; 10 additional reports of Zika virus disease among pregnant women are currently under investigation. No Zika virus-related hospitalizations or deaths among pregnant women were reported. Pregnancy outcomes among the nine confirmed cases included two early pregnancy losses, two elective terminations, and three live births (two apparently healthy infants and one infant with severe microcephaly); two pregnancies (approximately 18 weeks&apos; and 34 weeks&apos; gestation) are continuing without known complications. Confirmed cases of Zika virus infection were reported among women who had traveled to one or more of the following nine areas with ongoing local transmission of Zika virus: American Samoa, Brazil, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Samoa. This report summarizes findings from the nine women with confirmed Zika virus infection during pregnancy, including case reports for four women with various clinical outcomes. U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure during pregnancy should follow CDC guidelines for patient evaluation and management. Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition. CDC has developed a voluntary registry to collect information about U.S. pregnant women with confirmed Zika virus infection and their infants. Information about the registry is in preparation and will be available on the CDC website.</b:Comments>
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