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Transmission of Zika Virus Through Sexual Contact with Travelers to Areas of Ongoing Transmission - Continental United States, 2016.

Abstract Zika virus is a flavivirus closely related to dengue, West Nile, and yellow fever viruses. Although spread is primarily by Aedes species mosquitoes, two instances of sexual transmission of Zika virus have been reported, and replicative virus has been isolated from semen of one man with hematospermia. On February 5, 2016, CDC published recommendations for preventing sexual transmission of Zika virus. Updated prevention guidelines were published on February 23. During February 6-22, 2016, CDC received reports of 14 instances of suspected sexual transmission of Zika virus. Among these, two laboratory-confirmed cases and four probable cases of Zika virus disease have been identified among women whose only known risk factor was sexual contact with a symptomatic male partner with recent travel to an area with ongoing Zika virus transmission. Two instances have been excluded based on additional information, and six others are still under investigation. State, territorial, and local public health departments, clinicians, and the public should be aware of current recommendations for preventing sexual transmission of Zika virus, particularly to pregnant women. Men who reside in or have traveled to an area of ongoing Zika virus transmission and have a pregnant partner should abstain from sexual activity or consistently and correctly use condoms during sex with their pregnant partner for the duration of the pregnancy.
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Travel

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start
%A Hills, Susan L.; Russell, Kate; Hennessey, Morgan; Williams, Charnetta; Oster, Alexandra M.; Fischer, Marc; Mead, Paul
%T Transmission of Zika Virus Through Sexual Contact with Travelers to Areas of Ongoing Transmission - Continental United States, 2016.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, vol. 65, no. 8, pp. 215-216
%D 03/2016
%V 65
%N 8
%M eng
%B Zika virus is a flavivirus closely related to dengue, West Nile, and yellow fever viruses. Although spread is primarily by Aedes species mosquitoes, two instances of sexual transmission of Zika virus have been reported, and replicative virus has been isolated from semen of one man with hematospermia. On February 5, 2016, CDC published recommendations for preventing sexual transmission of Zika virus. Updated prevention guidelines were published on February 23. During February 6-22, 2016, CDC received reports of 14 instances of suspected sexual transmission of Zika virus. Among these, two laboratory-confirmed cases and four probable cases of Zika virus disease have been identified among women whose only known risk factor was sexual contact with a symptomatic male partner with recent travel to an area with ongoing Zika virus transmission. Two instances have been excluded based on additional information, and six others are still under investigation. State, territorial, and local public health departments, clinicians, and the public should be aware of current recommendations for preventing sexual transmission of Zika virus, particularly to pregnant women. Men who reside in or have traveled to an area of ongoing Zika virus transmission and have a pregnant partner should abstain from sexual activity or consistently and correctly use condoms during sex with their pregnant partner for the duration of the pregnancy.
%K Adult, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.), Condoms, Female, Guidelines as Topic, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Pregnancy, Sexual Behavior, Travel, United States, Young Adult, Zika Virus, Zika Virus Infection
%P 215
%L 216
%Y 10.15585/mmwr.mm6508e2
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2016.......65..215H

@Article{Hills2016,
author="Hills, Susan L.
and Russell, Kate
and Hennessey, Morgan
and Williams, Charnetta
and Oster, Alexandra M.
and Fischer, Marc
and Mead, Paul",
title="Transmission of Zika Virus Through Sexual Contact with Travelers to Areas of Ongoing Transmission - Continental United States, 2016.",
journal="MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report",
year="2016",
month="Mar",
day="04",
volume="65",
number="8",
pages="215--216",
keywords="Adult",
keywords="Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)",
keywords="Condoms",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Guidelines as Topic",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Male",
keywords="Middle Aged",
keywords="Pregnancy",
keywords="Sexual Behavior",
keywords="Travel",
keywords="United States",
keywords="Young Adult",
keywords="Zika Virus",
keywords="Zika Virus Infection",
abstract="Zika virus is a flavivirus closely related to dengue, West Nile, and yellow fever viruses. Although spread is primarily by Aedes species mosquitoes, two instances of sexual transmission of Zika virus have been reported, and replicative virus has been isolated from semen of one man with hematospermia. On February 5, 2016, CDC published recommendations for preventing sexual transmission of Zika virus. Updated prevention guidelines were published on February 23. During February 6-22, 2016, CDC received reports of 14 instances of suspected sexual transmission of Zika virus. Among these, two laboratory-confirmed cases and four probable cases of Zika virus disease have been identified among women whose only known risk factor was sexual contact with a symptomatic male partner with recent travel to an area with ongoing Zika virus transmission. Two instances have been excluded based on additional information, and six others are still under investigation. State, territorial, and local public health departments, clinicians, and the public should be aware of current recommendations for preventing sexual transmission of Zika virus, particularly to pregnant women. Men who reside in or have traveled to an area of ongoing Zika virus transmission and have a pregnant partner should abstain from sexual activity or consistently and correctly use condoms during sex with their pregnant partner for the duration of the pregnancy.",
issn="1545-861X",
doi="10.15585/mmwr.mm6508e2",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26937739",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Transmission of Zika Virus Through Sexual Contact with Travelers to Areas of Ongoing Transmission - Continental United States, 2016.
%A Hills, Susan L.
%A Russell, Kate
%A Hennessey, Morgan
%A Williams, Charnetta
%A Oster, Alexandra M.
%A Fischer, Marc
%A Mead, Paul
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
%D 2016
%8 Mar 04
%V 65
%N 8
%@ 1545-861X
%G eng
%F Hills2016
%X Zika virus is a flavivirus closely related to dengue, West Nile, and yellow fever viruses. Although spread is primarily by Aedes species mosquitoes, two instances of sexual transmission of Zika virus have been reported, and replicative virus has been isolated from semen of one man with hematospermia. On February 5, 2016, CDC published recommendations for preventing sexual transmission of Zika virus. Updated prevention guidelines were published on February 23. During February 6-22, 2016, CDC received reports of 14 instances of suspected sexual transmission of Zika virus. Among these, two laboratory-confirmed cases and four probable cases of Zika virus disease have been identified among women whose only known risk factor was sexual contact with a symptomatic male partner with recent travel to an area with ongoing Zika virus transmission. Two instances have been excluded based on additional information, and six others are still under investigation. State, territorial, and local public health departments, clinicians, and the public should be aware of current recommendations for preventing sexual transmission of Zika virus, particularly to pregnant women. Men who reside in or have traveled to an area of ongoing Zika virus transmission and have a pregnant partner should abstain from sexual activity or consistently and correctly use condoms during sex with their pregnant partner for the duration of the pregnancy.
%K Adult
%K Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
%K Condoms
%K Female
%K Guidelines as Topic
%K Humans
%K Male
%K Middle Aged
%K Pregnancy
%K Sexual Behavior
%K Travel
%K United States
%K Young Adult
%K Zika Virus
%K Zika Virus Infection
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6508e2
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26937739
%P 215-216

PT Journal
AU Hills, SL
   Russell, K
   Hennessey, M
   Williams, C
   Oster, AM
   Fischer, M
   Mead, P
TI Transmission of Zika Virus Through Sexual Contact with Travelers to Areas of Ongoing Transmission - Continental United States, 2016.
SO MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JI MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
PD Mar
PY 2016
BP 215
EP 216
VL 65
IS 8
DI 10.15585/mmwr.mm6508e2
LA eng
DE Adult; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.); Condoms; Female; Guidelines as Topic; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Pregnancy; Sexual Behavior; Travel; United States; Young Adult; Zika Virus; Zika Virus Infection
AB Zika virus is a flavivirus closely related to dengue, West Nile, and yellow fever viruses. Although spread is primarily by Aedes species mosquitoes, two instances of sexual transmission of Zika virus have been reported, and replicative virus has been isolated from semen of one man with hematospermia. On February 5, 2016, CDC published recommendations for preventing sexual transmission of Zika virus. Updated prevention guidelines were published on February 23. During February 6-22, 2016, CDC received reports of 14 instances of suspected sexual transmission of Zika virus. Among these, two laboratory-confirmed cases and four probable cases of Zika virus disease have been identified among women whose only known risk factor was sexual contact with a symptomatic male partner with recent travel to an area with ongoing Zika virus transmission. Two instances have been excluded based on additional information, and six others are still under investigation. State, territorial, and local public health departments, clinicians, and the public should be aware of current recommendations for preventing sexual transmission of Zika virus, particularly to pregnant women. Men who reside in or have traveled to an area of ongoing Zika virus transmission and have a pregnant partner should abstain from sexual activity or consistently and correctly use condoms during sex with their pregnant partner for the duration of the pregnancy.
ER

PMID- 26937739
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20160304
DCOM- 20160708
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 65
IP  - 8
DP  - 2016 Mar 4
TI  - Transmission of Zika Virus Through Sexual Contact with Travelers to Areas of
      Ongoing Transmission - Continental United States, 2016.
PG  - 215-6
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6508e2 [doi]
AB  - Zika virus is a flavivirus closely related to dengue, West Nile, and yellow fever
      viruses. Although spread is primarily by Aedes species mosquitoes, two instances 
      of sexual transmission of Zika virus have been reported, and replicative virus
      has been isolated from semen of one man with hematospermia. On February 5, 2016, 
      CDC published recommendations for preventing sexual transmission of Zika virus.
      Updated prevention guidelines were published on February 23. During February
      6-22, 2016, CDC received reports of 14 instances of suspected sexual transmission
      of Zika virus. Among these, two laboratory-confirmed cases and four probable
      cases of Zika virus disease have been identified among women whose only known
      risk factor was sexual contact with a symptomatic male partner with recent travel
      to an area with ongoing Zika virus transmission. Two instances have been excluded
      based on additional information, and six others are still under investigation.
      State, territorial, and local public health departments, clinicians, and the
      public should be aware of current recommendations for preventing sexual
      transmission of Zika virus, particularly to pregnant women. Men who reside in or 
      have traveled to an area of ongoing Zika virus transmission and have a pregnant
      partner should abstain from sexual activity or consistently and correctly use
      condoms during sex with their pregnant partner for the duration of the pregnancy.
FAU - Hills, Susan L
AU  - Hills SL
FAU - Russell, Kate
AU  - Russell K
FAU - Hennessey, Morgan
AU  - Hennessey M
FAU - Williams, Charnetta
AU  - Williams C
FAU - Oster, Alexandra M
AU  - Oster AM
FAU - Fischer, Marc
AU  - Fischer M
FAU - Mead, Paul
AU  - Mead P
LA  - eng
PT  - Case Reports
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160304
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
MH  - Condoms/utilization
MH  - Female
MH  - Guidelines as Topic
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Sexual Behavior/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - *Travel
MH  - United States
MH  - Young Adult
MH  - Zika Virus/*isolation & purification
MH  - Zika Virus Infection/*diagnosis/*transmission
EDAT- 2016/03/05 06:00
MHDA- 2016/07/09 06:00
CRDT- 2016/03/04 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6508e2 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016 Mar 4;65(8):215-6. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6508e2.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Hills, Susan L.
AU  - Russell, Kate
AU  - Hennessey, Morgan
AU  - Williams, Charnetta
AU  - Oster, Alexandra M.
AU  - Fischer, Marc
AU  - Mead, Paul
PY  - 2016/Mar/04
TI  - Transmission of Zika Virus Through Sexual Contact with Travelers to Areas of Ongoing Transmission - Continental United States, 2016.
T2  - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
JO  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
SP  - 215
EP  - 216
VL  - 65
IS  - 8
KW  - Adult
KW  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
KW  - Condoms
KW  - Female
KW  - Guidelines as Topic
KW  - Humans
KW  - Male
KW  - Middle Aged
KW  - Pregnancy
KW  - Sexual Behavior
KW  - Travel
KW  - United States
KW  - Young Adult
KW  - Zika Virus
KW  - Zika Virus Infection
N2  - Zika virus is a flavivirus closely related to dengue, West Nile, and yellow fever viruses. Although spread is primarily by Aedes species mosquitoes, two instances of sexual transmission of Zika virus have been reported, and replicative virus has been isolated from semen of one man with hematospermia. On February 5, 2016, CDC published recommendations for preventing sexual transmission of Zika virus. Updated prevention guidelines were published on February 23. During February 6-22, 2016, CDC received reports of 14 instances of suspected sexual transmission of Zika virus. Among these, two laboratory-confirmed cases and four probable cases of Zika virus disease have been identified among women whose only known risk factor was sexual contact with a symptomatic male partner with recent travel to an area with ongoing Zika virus transmission. Two instances have been excluded based on additional information, and six others are still under investigation. State, territorial, and local public health departments, clinicians, and the public should be aware of current recommendations for preventing sexual transmission of Zika virus, particularly to pregnant women. Men who reside in or have traveled to an area of ongoing Zika virus transmission and have a pregnant partner should abstain from sexual activity or consistently and correctly use condoms during sex with their pregnant partner for the duration of the pregnancy.
SN  - 1545-861X
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6508e2
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26937739
ID  - Hills2016
ER  - 
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