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Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Infants and Children with Possible Zika Virus Infection--United States, February 2016.

Abstract CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy and expanded guidelines to include infants and children with possible acute Zika virus disease. This update contains a new recommendation for routine care for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy but did not receive Zika virus testing, when the infant has a normal head circumference, normal prenatal and postnatal ultrasounds (if performed), and normal physical examination. Acute Zika virus disease should be suspected in an infant or child aged <18 years who 1) traveled to or resided in an affected area within the past 2 weeks and 2) has ?2 of the following manifestations: fever, rash, conjunctivitis, or arthralgia. Because maternal-infant transmission of Zika virus during delivery is possible, acute Zika virus disease should also be suspected in an infant during the first 2 weeks of life 1) whose mother traveled to or resided in an affected area within 2 weeks of delivery and 2) who has ?2 of the following manifestations: fever, rash, conjunctivitis, or arthralgia. Evidence suggests that Zika virus illness in children is usually mild. As an arboviral disease, Zika virus disease is nationally notifiable. Health care providers should report suspected cases of Zika virus disease to their local, state, or territorial health departments to arrange testing and so that action can be taken to reduce the risk for local Zika virus transmission. As new information becomes available, these guidelines will be updated: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Health Personnel

Practice Guidelines as Topic

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start
%A Fleming-Dutra, Katherine E.; Nelson, Jennifer M.; Fischer, Marc; Staples, J. Erin; Karwowski, Mateusz P.; Mead, Paul; Villanueva, Julie; Renquist, Christina M.; Minta, Anna A.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Honein, Margaret A.; Moore, Cynthia A.; Rasmussen, Sonja A.
%T Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Infants and Children with Possible Zika Virus Infection--United States, February 2016.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, vol. 65, no. 7, pp. 182-187
%D 02/2016
%V 65
%N 7
%M eng
%B CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy and expanded guidelines to include infants and children with possible acute Zika virus disease. This update contains a new recommendation for routine care for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy but did not receive Zika virus testing, when the infant has a normal head circumference, normal prenatal and postnatal ultrasounds (if performed), and normal physical examination. Acute Zika virus disease should be suspected in an infant or child aged <18 years who 1) traveled to or resided in an affected area within the past 2 weeks and 2) has ?2 of the following manifestations: fever, rash, conjunctivitis, or arthralgia. Because maternal-infant transmission of Zika virus during delivery is possible, acute Zika virus disease should also be suspected in an infant during the first 2 weeks of life 1) whose mother traveled to or resided in an affected area within 2 weeks of delivery and 2) who has ?2 of the following manifestations: fever, rash, conjunctivitis, or arthralgia. Evidence suggests that Zika virus illness in children is usually mild. As an arboviral disease, Zika virus disease is nationally notifiable. Health care providers should report suspected cases of Zika virus disease to their local, state, or territorial health departments to arrange testing and so that action can be taken to reduce the risk for local Zika virus transmission. As new information becomes available, these guidelines will be updated: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/.
%K Adolescent, Arthralgia, Breast Feeding, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.), Child, Child, Preschool, Conjunctivitis, Diagnosis, Differential, Exanthema, Female, Fever, Health Personnel, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Travel, United States, Zika Virus Infection
%P 182
%L 187
%Y 10.15585/mmwr.mm6507e1
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2016.......65..182F

@Article{Fleming-Dutra2016,
author="Fleming-Dutra, Katherine E.
and Nelson, Jennifer M.
and Fischer, Marc
and Staples, J. Erin
and Karwowski, Mateusz P.
and Mead, Paul
and Villanueva, Julie
and Renquist, Christina M.
and Minta, Anna A.
and Jamieson, Denise J.
and Honein, Margaret A.
and Moore, Cynthia A.
and Rasmussen, Sonja A.",
title="Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Infants and Children with Possible Zika Virus Infection--United States, February 2016.",
journal="MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report",
year="2016",
month="Feb",
day="26",
volume="65",
number="7",
pages="182--187",
keywords="Adolescent",
keywords="Arthralgia",
keywords="Breast Feeding",
keywords="Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)",
keywords="Child",
keywords="Child, Preschool",
keywords="Conjunctivitis",
keywords="Diagnosis, Differential",
keywords="Exanthema",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Fever",
keywords="Health Personnel",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Infant",
keywords="Infant, Newborn",
keywords="Practice Guidelines as Topic",
keywords="Pregnancy",
keywords="Pregnancy Complications, Infectious",
keywords="Travel",
keywords="United States",
keywords="Zika Virus Infection",
abstract="CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy and expanded guidelines to include infants and children with possible acute Zika virus disease. This update contains a new recommendation for routine care for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy but did not receive Zika virus testing, when the infant has a normal head circumference, normal prenatal and postnatal ultrasounds (if performed), and normal physical examination. Acute Zika virus disease should be suspected in an infant or child aged <18 years who 1) traveled to or resided in an affected area within the past 2 weeks and 2) has ?2 of the following manifestations: fever, rash, conjunctivitis, or arthralgia. Because maternal-infant transmission of Zika virus during delivery is possible, acute Zika virus disease should also be suspected in an infant during the first 2 weeks of life 1) whose mother traveled to or resided in an affected area within 2 weeks of delivery and 2) who has ?2 of the following manifestations: fever, rash, conjunctivitis, or arthralgia. Evidence suggests that Zika virus illness in children is usually mild. As an arboviral disease, Zika virus disease is nationally notifiable. Health care providers should report suspected cases of Zika virus disease to their local, state, or territorial health departments to arrange testing and so that action can be taken to reduce the risk for local Zika virus transmission. As new information becomes available, these guidelines will be updated: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/.",
issn="1545-861X",
doi="10.15585/mmwr.mm6507e1",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26914500",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Infants and Children with Possible Zika Virus Infection--United States, February 2016.
%A Fleming-Dutra, Katherine E.
%A Nelson, Jennifer M.
%A Fischer, Marc
%A Staples, J. Erin
%A Karwowski, Mateusz P.
%A Mead, Paul
%A Villanueva, Julie
%A Renquist, Christina M.
%A Minta, Anna A.
%A Jamieson, Denise J.
%A Honein, Margaret A.
%A Moore, Cynthia A.
%A Rasmussen, Sonja A.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
%D 2016
%8 Feb 26
%V 65
%N 7
%@ 1545-861X
%G eng
%F Fleming-Dutra2016
%X CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy and expanded guidelines to include infants and children with possible acute Zika virus disease. This update contains a new recommendation for routine care for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy but did not receive Zika virus testing, when the infant has a normal head circumference, normal prenatal and postnatal ultrasounds (if performed), and normal physical examination. Acute Zika virus disease should be suspected in an infant or child aged <18 years who 1) traveled to or resided in an affected area within the past 2 weeks and 2) has ?2 of the following manifestations: fever, rash, conjunctivitis, or arthralgia. Because maternal-infant transmission of Zika virus during delivery is possible, acute Zika virus disease should also be suspected in an infant during the first 2 weeks of life 1) whose mother traveled to or resided in an affected area within 2 weeks of delivery and 2) who has ?2 of the following manifestations: fever, rash, conjunctivitis, or arthralgia. Evidence suggests that Zika virus illness in children is usually mild. As an arboviral disease, Zika virus disease is nationally notifiable. Health care providers should report suspected cases of Zika virus disease to their local, state, or territorial health departments to arrange testing and so that action can be taken to reduce the risk for local Zika virus transmission. As new information becomes available, these guidelines will be updated: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/.
%K Adolescent
%K Arthralgia
%K Breast Feeding
%K Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
%K Child
%K Child, Preschool
%K Conjunctivitis
%K Diagnosis, Differential
%K Exanthema
%K Female
%K Fever
%K Health Personnel
%K Humans
%K Infant
%K Infant, Newborn
%K Practice Guidelines as Topic
%K Pregnancy
%K Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
%K Travel
%K United States
%K Zika Virus Infection
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6507e1
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26914500
%P 182-187

PT Journal
AU Fleming-Dutra, KE
   Nelson, JM
   Fischer, M
   Staples, JE
   Karwowski, MP
   Mead, P
   Villanueva, J
   Renquist, CM
   Minta, AA
   Jamieson, DJ
   Honein, MA
   Moore, CA
   Rasmussen, SA
TI Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Infants and Children with Possible Zika Virus Infection--United States, February 2016.
SO MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JI MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
PD Feb
PY 2016
BP 182
EP 187
VL 65
IS 7
DI 10.15585/mmwr.mm6507e1
LA eng
DE Adolescent; Arthralgia; Breast Feeding; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.); Child; Child, Preschool; Conjunctivitis; Diagnosis, Differential; Exanthema; Female; Fever; Health Personnel; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications, Infectious; Travel; United States; Zika Virus Infection
AB CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy and expanded guidelines to include infants and children with possible acute Zika virus disease. This update contains a new recommendation for routine care for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy but did not receive Zika virus testing, when the infant has a normal head circumference, normal prenatal and postnatal ultrasounds (if performed), and normal physical examination. Acute Zika virus disease should be suspected in an infant or child aged <18 years who 1) traveled to or resided in an affected area within the past 2 weeks and 2) has ?2 of the following manifestations: fever, rash, conjunctivitis, or arthralgia. Because maternal-infant transmission of Zika virus during delivery is possible, acute Zika virus disease should also be suspected in an infant during the first 2 weeks of life 1) whose mother traveled to or resided in an affected area within 2 weeks of delivery and 2) who has ?2 of the following manifestations: fever, rash, conjunctivitis, or arthralgia. Evidence suggests that Zika virus illness in children is usually mild. As an arboviral disease, Zika virus disease is nationally notifiable. Health care providers should report suspected cases of Zika virus disease to their local, state, or territorial health departments to arrange testing and so that action can be taken to reduce the risk for local Zika virus transmission. As new information becomes available, these guidelines will be updated: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/.
ER

PMID- 26914500
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20160226
DCOM- 20160629
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 65
IP  - 7
DP  - 2016 Feb 26
TI  - Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Infants and
      Children with Possible Zika Virus Infection--United States, February 2016.
PG  - 182-7
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6507e1 [doi]
AB  - CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for 
      infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus
      transmission during pregnancy and expanded guidelines to include infants and
      children with possible acute Zika virus disease. This update contains a new
      recommendation for routine care for infants born to mothers who traveled to or
      resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy but did not
      receive Zika virus testing, when the infant has a normal head circumference,
      normal prenatal and postnatal ultrasounds (if performed), and normal physical
      examination. Acute Zika virus disease should be suspected in an infant or child
      aged &lt;18 years who 1) traveled to or resided in an affected area within the past 
      2 weeks and 2) has &gt;/=2 of the following manifestations: fever, rash,
      conjunctivitis, or arthralgia. Because maternal-infant transmission of Zika virus
      during delivery is possible, acute Zika virus disease should also be suspected in
      an infant during the first 2 weeks of life 1) whose mother traveled to or resided
      in an affected area within 2 weeks of delivery and 2) who has &gt;/=2 of the
      following manifestations: fever, rash, conjunctivitis, or arthralgia. Evidence
      suggests that Zika virus illness in children is usually mild. As an arboviral
      disease, Zika virus disease is nationally notifiable. Health care providers
      should report suspected cases of Zika virus disease to their local, state, or
      territorial health departments to arrange testing and so that action can be taken
      to reduce the risk for local Zika virus transmission. As new information becomes 
      available, these guidelines will be updated: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/.
FAU - Fleming-Dutra, Katherine E
AU  - Fleming-Dutra KE
FAU - Nelson, Jennifer M
AU  - Nelson JM
FAU - Fischer, Marc
AU  - Fischer M
FAU - Staples, J Erin
AU  - Staples JE
FAU - Karwowski, Mateusz P
AU  - Karwowski MP
FAU - Mead, Paul
AU  - Mead P
FAU - Villanueva, Julie
AU  - Villanueva J
FAU - Renquist, Christina M
AU  - Renquist CM
FAU - Minta, Anna A
AU  - Minta AA
FAU - Jamieson, Denise J
AU  - Jamieson DJ
FAU - Honein, Margaret A
AU  - Honein MA
FAU - Moore, Cynthia A
AU  - Moore CA
FAU - Rasmussen, Sonja A
AU  - Rasmussen SA
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160226
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Arthralgia/etiology
MH  - Breast Feeding
MH  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
MH  - Child
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - Conjunctivitis/etiology
MH  - Diagnosis, Differential
MH  - Exanthema/etiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Fever/etiology
MH  - *Health Personnel
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant
MH  - Infant, Newborn
MH  - *Practice Guidelines as Topic
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention &amp; control
MH  - Travel
MH  - United States
MH  - Zika Virus Infection/congenital/*diagnosis/*therapy
EDAT- 2016/02/26 06:00
MHDA- 2016/06/30 06:00
CRDT- 2016/02/26 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6507e1 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016 Feb 26;65(7):182-7. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6507e1.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Fleming-Dutra, Katherine E.
AU  - Nelson, Jennifer M.
AU  - Fischer, Marc
AU  - Staples, J. Erin
AU  - Karwowski, Mateusz P.
AU  - Mead, Paul
AU  - Villanueva, Julie
AU  - Renquist, Christina M.
AU  - Minta, Anna A.
AU  - Jamieson, Denise J.
AU  - Honein, Margaret A.
AU  - Moore, Cynthia A.
AU  - Rasmussen, Sonja A.
PY  - 2016/Feb/26
TI  - Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Infants and Children with Possible Zika Virus Infection--United States, February 2016.
T2  - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
JO  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
SP  - 182
EP  - 187
VL  - 65
IS  - 7
KW  - Adolescent
KW  - Arthralgia
KW  - Breast Feeding
KW  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
KW  - Child
KW  - Child, Preschool
KW  - Conjunctivitis
KW  - Diagnosis, Differential
KW  - Exanthema
KW  - Female
KW  - Fever
KW  - Health Personnel
KW  - Humans
KW  - Infant
KW  - Infant, Newborn
KW  - Practice Guidelines as Topic
KW  - Pregnancy
KW  - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
KW  - Travel
KW  - United States
KW  - Zika Virus Infection
N2  - CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy and expanded guidelines to include infants and children with possible acute Zika virus disease. This update contains a new recommendation for routine care for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy but did not receive Zika virus testing, when the infant has a normal head circumference, normal prenatal and postnatal ultrasounds (if performed), and normal physical examination. Acute Zika virus disease should be suspected in an infant or child aged <18 years who 1) traveled to or resided in an affected area within the past 2 weeks and 2) has ?2 of the following manifestations: fever, rash, conjunctivitis, or arthralgia. Because maternal-infant transmission of Zika virus during delivery is possible, acute Zika virus disease should also be suspected in an infant during the first 2 weeks of life 1) whose mother traveled to or resided in an affected area within 2 weeks of delivery and 2) who has ?2 of the following manifestations: fever, rash, conjunctivitis, or arthralgia. Evidence suggests that Zika virus illness in children is usually mild. As an arboviral disease, Zika virus disease is nationally notifiable. Health care providers should report suspected cases of Zika virus disease to their local, state, or territorial health departments to arrange testing and so that action can be taken to reduce the risk for local Zika virus transmission. As new information becomes available, these guidelines will be updated: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/.
SN  - 1545-861X
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6507e1
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26914500
ID  - Fleming-Dutra2016
ER  - 
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