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Local Transmission of Zika Virus--Puerto Rico, November 23, 2015-January 28, 2016.

Abstract Zika virus, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, spread to the Region of the Americas (Americas) in mid-2015, and appears to be related to congenital microcephaly and Guillain-Barr? syndrome (1,2). On February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the occurrence of microcephaly cases in association with Zika virus infection to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.* On December 31, 2015, Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDH) reported the first locally acquired (index) case of Zika virus disease in a jurisdiction of the United States in a patient from southeastern Puerto Rico. During November 23, 2015-January 28, 2016, passive and enhanced surveillance for Zika virus disease identified 30 laboratory-confirmed cases. Most (93%) patients resided in eastern Puerto Rico or the San Juan metropolitan area. The most frequently reported signs and symptoms were rash (77%), myalgia (77%), arthralgia (73%), and fever (73%). Three (10%) patients were hospitalized. One case occurred in a patient hospitalized for Guillain-Barr? syndrome, and one occurred in a pregnant woman. Because the most common mosquito vector of Zika virus, Aedes aegypti, is present throughout Puerto Rico, Zika virus is expected to continue to spread across the island. The public health response in Puerto Rico is being coordinated by PRDH with assistance from CDC. Clinicians in Puerto Rico should report all cases of microcephaly, Guillain-Barr? syndrome, and suspected Zika virus disease to PRDH. Other adverse reproductive outcomes, including fetal demise associated with Zika virus infection, should be reported to PRDH. To avoid infection with Zika virus, residents of and visitors to Puerto Rico, particularly pregnant women, should strictly follow steps to avoid mosquito bites, including wearing pants and long-sleeved shirts, using permethrin-treated clothing and gear, using an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellent, and ensuring that windows and doors have intact screens.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start
%A Thomas, Dana L.; Sharp, Tyler M.; Torres, Jomil; Armstrong, Paige A.; Munoz-Jordan, Jorge; Ryff, Kyle R.; Martinez-Qui?ones, Alma; Arias-Berr?os, Jos?; Mayshack, Marrielle; Garayalde, Glenn J.; Saavedra, Sonia; Luciano, Carlos A.; Valencia-Prado, Miguel; Waterman, Steve; Rivera-Garc?a, Brenda
%T Local Transmission of Zika Virus--Puerto Rico, November 23, 2015-January 28, 2016.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, vol. 65, no. 6, pp. 154-158
%D 02/2016
%V 65
%N 6
%M eng
%B Zika virus, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, spread to the Region of the Americas (Americas) in mid-2015, and appears to be related to congenital microcephaly and Guillain-Barr? syndrome (1,2). On February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the occurrence of microcephaly cases in association with Zika virus infection to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.* On December 31, 2015, Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDH) reported the first locally acquired (index) case of Zika virus disease in a jurisdiction of the United States in a patient from southeastern Puerto Rico. During November 23, 2015-January 28, 2016, passive and enhanced surveillance for Zika virus disease identified 30 laboratory-confirmed cases. Most (93%) patients resided in eastern Puerto Rico or the San Juan metropolitan area. The most frequently reported signs and symptoms were rash (77%), myalgia (77%), arthralgia (73%), and fever (73%). Three (10%) patients were hospitalized. One case occurred in a patient hospitalized for Guillain-Barr? syndrome, and one occurred in a pregnant woman. Because the most common mosquito vector of Zika virus, Aedes aegypti, is present throughout Puerto Rico, Zika virus is expected to continue to spread across the island. The public health response in Puerto Rico is being coordinated by PRDH with assistance from CDC. Clinicians in Puerto Rico should report all cases of microcephaly, Guillain-Barr? syndrome, and suspected Zika virus disease to PRDH. Other adverse reproductive outcomes, including fetal demise associated with Zika virus infection, should be reported to PRDH. To avoid infection with Zika virus, residents of and visitors to Puerto Rico, particularly pregnant women, should strictly follow steps to avoid mosquito bites, including wearing pants and long-sleeved shirts, using permethrin-treated clothing and gear, using an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellent, and ensuring that windows and doors have intact screens.
%K Adult, Aged, 80 and over, Female, Humans, Male, Pregnancy, Public Health Practice, Puerto Rico, Zika Virus, Zika Virus Infection
%P 154
%L 158
%Y 10.15585/mmwr.mm6506e2
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2016.......65..154T

@Article{Thomas2016,
author="Thomas, Dana L.
and Sharp, Tyler M.
and Torres, Jomil
and Armstrong, Paige A.
and Munoz-Jordan, Jorge
and Ryff, Kyle R.
and Martinez-Qui{\~n}ones, Alma
and Arias-Berr{\'i}os, Jos{\'e}
and Mayshack, Marrielle
and Garayalde, Glenn J.
and Saavedra, Sonia
and Luciano, Carlos A.
and Valencia-Prado, Miguel
and Waterman, Steve
and Rivera-Garc{\'i}a, Brenda",
title="Local Transmission of Zika Virus--Puerto Rico, November 23, 2015-January 28, 2016.",
journal="MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report",
year="2016",
month="Feb",
day="19",
volume="65",
number="6",
pages="154--158",
keywords="Adult",
keywords="Aged, 80 and over",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Male",
keywords="Pregnancy",
keywords="Public Health Practice",
keywords="Puerto Rico",
keywords="Zika Virus",
keywords="Zika Virus Infection",
abstract="Zika virus, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, spread to the Region of the Americas (Americas) in mid-2015, and appears to be related to congenital microcephaly and Guillain-Barr{\'e} syndrome (1,2). On February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the occurrence of microcephaly cases in association with Zika virus infection to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.* On December 31, 2015, Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDH) reported the first locally acquired (index) case of Zika virus disease in a jurisdiction of the United States in a patient from southeastern Puerto Rico. During November 23, 2015-January 28, 2016, passive and enhanced surveillance for Zika virus disease identified 30 laboratory-confirmed cases. Most (93\%) patients resided in eastern Puerto Rico or the San Juan metropolitan area. The most frequently reported signs and symptoms were rash (77\%), myalgia (77\%), arthralgia (73\%), and fever (73\%). Three (10\%) patients were hospitalized. One case occurred in a patient hospitalized for Guillain-Barr{\'e} syndrome, and one occurred in a pregnant woman. Because the most common mosquito vector of Zika virus, Aedes aegypti, is present throughout Puerto Rico, Zika virus is expected to continue to spread across the island. The public health response in Puerto Rico is being coordinated by PRDH with assistance from CDC. Clinicians in Puerto Rico should report all cases of microcephaly, Guillain-Barr{\'e} syndrome, and suspected Zika virus disease to PRDH. Other adverse reproductive outcomes, including fetal demise associated with Zika virus infection, should be reported to PRDH. To avoid infection with Zika virus, residents of and visitors to Puerto Rico, particularly pregnant women, should strictly follow steps to avoid mosquito bites, including wearing pants and long-sleeved shirts, using permethrin-treated clothing and gear, using an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellent, and ensuring that windows and doors have intact screens.",
issn="1545-861X",
doi="10.15585/mmwr.mm6506e2",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26890470",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Local Transmission of Zika Virus--Puerto Rico, November 23, 2015-January 28, 2016.
%A Thomas, Dana L.
%A Sharp, Tyler M.
%A Torres, Jomil
%A Armstrong, Paige A.
%A Munoz-Jordan, Jorge
%A Ryff, Kyle R.
%A Martinez-Qui?ones, Alma
%A Arias-Berr?os, Jos?
%A Mayshack, Marrielle
%A Garayalde, Glenn J.
%A Saavedra, Sonia
%A Luciano, Carlos A.
%A Valencia-Prado, Miguel
%A Waterman, Steve
%A Rivera-Garc?a, Brenda
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
%D 2016
%8 Feb 19
%V 65
%N 6
%@ 1545-861X
%G eng
%F Thomas2016
%X Zika virus, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, spread to the Region of the Americas (Americas) in mid-2015, and appears to be related to congenital microcephaly and Guillain-Barr? syndrome (1,2). On February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the occurrence of microcephaly cases in association with Zika virus infection to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.* On December 31, 2015, Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDH) reported the first locally acquired (index) case of Zika virus disease in a jurisdiction of the United States in a patient from southeastern Puerto Rico. During November 23, 2015-January 28, 2016, passive and enhanced surveillance for Zika virus disease identified 30 laboratory-confirmed cases. Most (93%) patients resided in eastern Puerto Rico or the San Juan metropolitan area. The most frequently reported signs and symptoms were rash (77%), myalgia (77%), arthralgia (73%), and fever (73%). Three (10%) patients were hospitalized. One case occurred in a patient hospitalized for Guillain-Barr? syndrome, and one occurred in a pregnant woman. Because the most common mosquito vector of Zika virus, Aedes aegypti, is present throughout Puerto Rico, Zika virus is expected to continue to spread across the island. The public health response in Puerto Rico is being coordinated by PRDH with assistance from CDC. Clinicians in Puerto Rico should report all cases of microcephaly, Guillain-Barr? syndrome, and suspected Zika virus disease to PRDH. Other adverse reproductive outcomes, including fetal demise associated with Zika virus infection, should be reported to PRDH. To avoid infection with Zika virus, residents of and visitors to Puerto Rico, particularly pregnant women, should strictly follow steps to avoid mosquito bites, including wearing pants and long-sleeved shirts, using permethrin-treated clothing and gear, using an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellent, and ensuring that windows and doors have intact screens.
%K Adult
%K Aged, 80 and over
%K Female
%K Humans
%K Male
%K Pregnancy
%K Public Health Practice
%K Puerto Rico
%K Zika Virus
%K Zika Virus Infection
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6506e2
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26890470
%P 154-158

PT Journal
AU Thomas, DL
   Sharp, TM
   Torres, J
   Armstrong, PA
   Munoz-Jordan, J
   Ryff, KR
   Martinez-Qui?ones, A
   Arias-Berr?os, J
   Mayshack, M
   Garayalde, GJ
   Saavedra, S
   Luciano, CA
   Valencia-Prado, M
   Waterman, S
   Rivera-Garc?a, B
TI Local Transmission of Zika Virus--Puerto Rico, November 23, 2015-January 28, 2016.
SO MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JI MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
PD Feb
PY 2016
BP 154
EP 158
VL 65
IS 6
DI 10.15585/mmwr.mm6506e2
LA eng
DE Adult; Aged, 80 and over; Female; Humans; Male; Pregnancy; Public Health Practice; Puerto Rico; Zika Virus; Zika Virus Infection
AB Zika virus, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, spread to the Region of the Americas (Americas) in mid-2015, and appears to be related to congenital microcephaly and Guillain-Barr? syndrome (1,2). On February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the occurrence of microcephaly cases in association with Zika virus infection to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.* On December 31, 2015, Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDH) reported the first locally acquired (index) case of Zika virus disease in a jurisdiction of the United States in a patient from southeastern Puerto Rico. During November 23, 2015-January 28, 2016, passive and enhanced surveillance for Zika virus disease identified 30 laboratory-confirmed cases. Most (93%) patients resided in eastern Puerto Rico or the San Juan metropolitan area. The most frequently reported signs and symptoms were rash (77%), myalgia (77%), arthralgia (73%), and fever (73%). Three (10%) patients were hospitalized. One case occurred in a patient hospitalized for Guillain-Barr? syndrome, and one occurred in a pregnant woman. Because the most common mosquito vector of Zika virus, Aedes aegypti, is present throughout Puerto Rico, Zika virus is expected to continue to spread across the island. The public health response in Puerto Rico is being coordinated by PRDH with assistance from CDC. Clinicians in Puerto Rico should report all cases of microcephaly, Guillain-Barr? syndrome, and suspected Zika virus disease to PRDH. Other adverse reproductive outcomes, including fetal demise associated with Zika virus infection, should be reported to PRDH. To avoid infection with Zika virus, residents of and visitors to Puerto Rico, particularly pregnant women, should strictly follow steps to avoid mosquito bites, including wearing pants and long-sleeved shirts, using permethrin-treated clothing and gear, using an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellent, and ensuring that windows and doors have intact screens.
ER

PMID- 26890470
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20160219
DCOM- 20160622
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 65
IP  - 6
DP  - 2016 Feb 19
TI  - Local Transmission of Zika Virus--Puerto Rico, November 23, 2015-January 28,
      2016.
PG  - 154-8
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6506e2 [doi]
AB  - Zika virus, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, spread to the Region of the Americas
      (Americas) in mid-2015, and appears to be related to congenital microcephaly and 
      Guillain-Barre syndrome (1,2). On February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization
      (WHO) declared the occurrence of microcephaly cases in association with Zika
      virus infection to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.* On
      December 31, 2015, Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDH) reported the first
      locally acquired (index) case of Zika virus disease in a jurisdiction of the
      United States in a patient from southeastern Puerto Rico. During November 23,
      2015-January 28, 2016, passive and enhanced surveillance for Zika virus disease
      identified 30 laboratory-confirmed cases. Most (93%) patients resided in eastern 
      Puerto Rico or the San Juan metropolitan area. The most frequently reported signs
      and symptoms were rash (77%), myalgia (77%), arthralgia (73%), and fever (73%).
      Three (10%) patients were hospitalized. One case occurred in a patient
      hospitalized for Guillain-Barre syndrome, and one occurred in a pregnant woman.
      Because the most common mosquito vector of Zika virus, Aedes aegypti, is present 
      throughout Puerto Rico, Zika virus is expected to continue to spread across the
      island. The public health response in Puerto Rico is being coordinated by PRDH
      with assistance from CDC. Clinicians in Puerto Rico should report all cases of
      microcephaly, Guillain-Barre syndrome, and suspected Zika virus disease to PRDH. 
      Other adverse reproductive outcomes, including fetal demise associated with Zika 
      virus infection, should be reported to PRDH. To avoid infection with Zika virus, 
      residents of and visitors to Puerto Rico, particularly pregnant women, should
      strictly follow steps to avoid mosquito bites, including wearing pants and
      long-sleeved shirts, using permethrin-treated clothing and gear, using an
      Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellent, and ensuring
      that windows and doors have intact screens.
FAU - Thomas, Dana L
AU  - Thomas DL
FAU - Sharp, Tyler M
AU  - Sharp TM
FAU - Torres, Jomil
AU  - Torres J
FAU - Armstrong, Paige A
AU  - Armstrong PA
FAU - Munoz-Jordan, Jorge
AU  - Munoz-Jordan J
FAU - Ryff, Kyle R
AU  - Ryff KR
FAU - Martinez-Quinones, Alma
AU  - Martinez-Quinones A
FAU - Arias-Berrios, Jose
AU  - Arias-Berrios J
FAU - Mayshack, Marrielle
AU  - Mayshack M
FAU - Garayalde, Glenn J
AU  - Garayalde GJ
FAU - Saavedra, Sonia
AU  - Saavedra S
FAU - Luciano, Carlos A
AU  - Luciano CA
FAU - Valencia-Prado, Miguel
AU  - Valencia-Prado M
FAU - Waterman, Steve
AU  - Waterman S
FAU - Rivera-Garcia, Brenda
AU  - Rivera-Garcia B
LA  - eng
PT  - Case Reports
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160219
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Public Health Practice
MH  - Puerto Rico/epidemiology
MH  - Zika Virus/*isolation & purification
MH  - Zika Virus Infection/*diagnosis/epidemiology/*transmission
EDAT- 2016/02/20 06:00
MHDA- 2016/06/23 06:00
CRDT- 2016/02/19 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6506e2 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016 Feb 19;65(6):154-8. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6506e2.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Thomas, Dana L.
AU  - Sharp, Tyler M.
AU  - Torres, Jomil
AU  - Armstrong, Paige A.
AU  - Munoz-Jordan, Jorge
AU  - Ryff, Kyle R.
AU  - Martinez-Qui?ones, Alma
AU  - Arias-Berr?os, Jos?
AU  - Mayshack, Marrielle
AU  - Garayalde, Glenn J.
AU  - Saavedra, Sonia
AU  - Luciano, Carlos A.
AU  - Valencia-Prado, Miguel
AU  - Waterman, Steve
AU  - Rivera-Garc?a, Brenda
PY  - 2016/Feb/19
TI  - Local Transmission of Zika Virus--Puerto Rico, November 23, 2015-January 28, 2016.
T2  - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
JO  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
SP  - 154
EP  - 158
VL  - 65
IS  - 6
KW  - Adult
KW  - Aged, 80 and over
KW  - Female
KW  - Humans
KW  - Male
KW  - Pregnancy
KW  - Public Health Practice
KW  - Puerto Rico
KW  - Zika Virus
KW  - Zika Virus Infection
N2  - Zika virus, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, spread to the Region of the Americas (Americas) in mid-2015, and appears to be related to congenital microcephaly and Guillain-Barr? syndrome (1,2). On February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the occurrence of microcephaly cases in association with Zika virus infection to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.* On December 31, 2015, Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDH) reported the first locally acquired (index) case of Zika virus disease in a jurisdiction of the United States in a patient from southeastern Puerto Rico. During November 23, 2015-January 28, 2016, passive and enhanced surveillance for Zika virus disease identified 30 laboratory-confirmed cases. Most (93%) patients resided in eastern Puerto Rico or the San Juan metropolitan area. The most frequently reported signs and symptoms were rash (77%), myalgia (77%), arthralgia (73%), and fever (73%). Three (10%) patients were hospitalized. One case occurred in a patient hospitalized for Guillain-Barr? syndrome, and one occurred in a pregnant woman. Because the most common mosquito vector of Zika virus, Aedes aegypti, is present throughout Puerto Rico, Zika virus is expected to continue to spread across the island. The public health response in Puerto Rico is being coordinated by PRDH with assistance from CDC. Clinicians in Puerto Rico should report all cases of microcephaly, Guillain-Barr? syndrome, and suspected Zika virus disease to PRDH. Other adverse reproductive outcomes, including fetal demise associated with Zika virus infection, should be reported to PRDH. To avoid infection with Zika virus, residents of and visitors to Puerto Rico, particularly pregnant women, should strictly follow steps to avoid mosquito bites, including wearing pants and long-sleeved shirts, using permethrin-treated clothing and gear, using an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellent, and ensuring that windows and doors have intact screens.
SN  - 1545-861X
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6506e2
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26890470
ID  - Thomas2016
ER  - 
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