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Zika Virus and Pregnancy: What Obstetric Health Care Providers Need to Know.

Abstract Zika virus is a flavivirus transmitted by Aedes (Stegomyia) species of mosquitoes. In May 2015, the World Health Organization confirmed the first local transmission of Zika virus in the Americas in Brazil. The virus has spread rapidly to other countries in the Americas; as of January 29, 2016, local transmission has been detected in at least 22 countries or territories, including the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Zika virus can infect pregnant women in all three trimesters. Although pregnant women do not appear to be more susceptible to or more severely affected by Zika virus infection, maternal-fetal transmission has been documented. Several pieces of evidence suggest that maternal Zika virus infection is associated with adverse neonatal outcomes, most notably microcephaly. Because of the number of countries and territories with local Zika virus transmission, it is likely that obstetric health care providers will care for pregnant women who live in or have traveled to an area of local Zika virus transmission. We review information on Zika virus, its clinical presentation, modes of transmission, laboratory testing, effects during pregnancy, and methods of prevention to assist obstetric health care providers in caring for pregnant women considering travel or with a history of travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission and pregnant women residing in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Zika Virus

Keywords
Journal Title obstetrics and gynecology
Publication Year Start
%A Meaney-Delman, Dana; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Staples, J. Erin; Oduyebo, Titilope; Ellington, Sascha R.; Petersen, Emily E.; Fischer, Marc; Jamieson, Denise J.
%T Zika Virus and Pregnancy: What Obstetric Health Care Providers Need to Know.
%J Obstetrics and gynecology, vol. 127, no. 4, pp. 642-648
%D 04/2016
%V 127
%N 4
%M eng
%B Zika virus is a flavivirus transmitted by Aedes (Stegomyia) species of mosquitoes. In May 2015, the World Health Organization confirmed the first local transmission of Zika virus in the Americas in Brazil. The virus has spread rapidly to other countries in the Americas; as of January 29, 2016, local transmission has been detected in at least 22 countries or territories, including the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Zika virus can infect pregnant women in all three trimesters. Although pregnant women do not appear to be more susceptible to or more severely affected by Zika virus infection, maternal-fetal transmission has been documented. Several pieces of evidence suggest that maternal Zika virus infection is associated with adverse neonatal outcomes, most notably microcephaly. Because of the number of countries and territories with local Zika virus transmission, it is likely that obstetric health care providers will care for pregnant women who live in or have traveled to an area of local Zika virus transmission. We review information on Zika virus, its clinical presentation, modes of transmission, laboratory testing, effects during pregnancy, and methods of prevention to assist obstetric health care providers in caring for pregnant women considering travel or with a history of travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission and pregnant women residing in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission.
%K Brazil, Female, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical, Microcephaly, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Puerto Rico, Travel, United States Virgin Islands, Zika Virus, Zika Virus Infection
%P 642
%L 648
%Y 10.1097/AOG.0000000000001378
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2016......127..642M

@Article{Meaney-Delman2016,
author="Meaney-Delman, Dana
and Rasmussen, Sonja A.
and Staples, J. Erin
and Oduyebo, Titilope
and Ellington, Sascha R.
and Petersen, Emily E.
and Fischer, Marc
and Jamieson, Denise J.",
title="Zika Virus and Pregnancy: What Obstetric Health Care Providers Need to Know.",
journal="Obstetrics and gynecology",
year="2016",
month="Apr",
volume="127",
number="4",
pages="642--648",
keywords="Brazil",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Infant, Newborn",
keywords="Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical",
keywords="Microcephaly",
keywords="Pregnancy",
keywords="Pregnancy Complications, Infectious",
keywords="Puerto Rico",
keywords="Travel",
keywords="United States Virgin Islands",
keywords="Zika Virus",
keywords="Zika Virus Infection",
abstract="Zika virus is a flavivirus transmitted by Aedes (Stegomyia) species of mosquitoes. In May 2015, the World Health Organization confirmed the first local transmission of Zika virus in the Americas in Brazil. The virus has spread rapidly to other countries in the Americas; as of January 29, 2016, local transmission has been detected in at least 22 countries or territories, including the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Zika virus can infect pregnant women in all three trimesters. Although pregnant women do not appear to be more susceptible to or more severely affected by Zika virus infection, maternal-fetal transmission has been documented. Several pieces of evidence suggest that maternal Zika virus infection is associated with adverse neonatal outcomes, most notably microcephaly. Because of the number of countries and territories with local Zika virus transmission, it is likely that obstetric health care providers will care for pregnant women who live in or have traveled to an area of local Zika virus transmission. We review information on Zika virus, its clinical presentation, modes of transmission, laboratory testing, effects during pregnancy, and methods of prevention to assist obstetric health care providers in caring for pregnant women considering travel or with a history of travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission and pregnant women residing in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission.",
issn="1873-233X",
doi="10.1097/AOG.0000000000001378",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26889662",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Zika Virus and Pregnancy: What Obstetric Health Care Providers Need to Know.
%A Meaney-Delman, Dana
%A Rasmussen, Sonja A.
%A Staples, J. Erin
%A Oduyebo, Titilope
%A Ellington, Sascha R.
%A Petersen, Emily E.
%A Fischer, Marc
%A Jamieson, Denise J.
%J Obstetrics and gynecology
%D 2016
%8 Apr
%V 127
%N 4
%@ 1873-233X
%G eng
%F Meaney-Delman2016
%X Zika virus is a flavivirus transmitted by Aedes (Stegomyia) species of mosquitoes. In May 2015, the World Health Organization confirmed the first local transmission of Zika virus in the Americas in Brazil. The virus has spread rapidly to other countries in the Americas; as of January 29, 2016, local transmission has been detected in at least 22 countries or territories, including the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Zika virus can infect pregnant women in all three trimesters. Although pregnant women do not appear to be more susceptible to or more severely affected by Zika virus infection, maternal-fetal transmission has been documented. Several pieces of evidence suggest that maternal Zika virus infection is associated with adverse neonatal outcomes, most notably microcephaly. Because of the number of countries and territories with local Zika virus transmission, it is likely that obstetric health care providers will care for pregnant women who live in or have traveled to an area of local Zika virus transmission. We review information on Zika virus, its clinical presentation, modes of transmission, laboratory testing, effects during pregnancy, and methods of prevention to assist obstetric health care providers in caring for pregnant women considering travel or with a history of travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission and pregnant women residing in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission.
%K Brazil
%K Female
%K Humans
%K Infant, Newborn
%K Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
%K Microcephaly
%K Pregnancy
%K Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
%K Puerto Rico
%K Travel
%K United States Virgin Islands
%K Zika Virus
%K Zika Virus Infection
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000001378
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26889662
%P 642-648

PT Journal
AU Meaney-Delman, D
   Rasmussen, SA
   Staples, JE
   Oduyebo, T
   Ellington, SR
   Petersen, EE
   Fischer, M
   Jamieson, DJ
TI Zika Virus and Pregnancy: What Obstetric Health Care Providers Need to Know.
SO Obstetrics and gynecology
JI Obstet Gynecol
PD Apr
PY 2016
BP 642
EP 648
VL 127
IS 4
DI 10.1097/AOG.0000000000001378
LA eng
DE Brazil; Female; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical; Microcephaly; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications, Infectious; Puerto Rico; Travel; United States Virgin Islands; Zika Virus; Zika Virus Infection
AB Zika virus is a flavivirus transmitted by Aedes (Stegomyia) species of mosquitoes. In May 2015, the World Health Organization confirmed the first local transmission of Zika virus in the Americas in Brazil. The virus has spread rapidly to other countries in the Americas; as of January 29, 2016, local transmission has been detected in at least 22 countries or territories, including the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Zika virus can infect pregnant women in all three trimesters. Although pregnant women do not appear to be more susceptible to or more severely affected by Zika virus infection, maternal-fetal transmission has been documented. Several pieces of evidence suggest that maternal Zika virus infection is associated with adverse neonatal outcomes, most notably microcephaly. Because of the number of countries and territories with local Zika virus transmission, it is likely that obstetric health care providers will care for pregnant women who live in or have traveled to an area of local Zika virus transmission. We review information on Zika virus, its clinical presentation, modes of transmission, laboratory testing, effects during pregnancy, and methods of prevention to assist obstetric health care providers in caring for pregnant women considering travel or with a history of travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission and pregnant women residing in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission.
ER

PMID- 26889662
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20160324
DCOM- 20160808
IS  - 1873-233X (Electronic)
IS  - 0029-7844 (Linking)
VI  - 127
IP  - 4
DP  - 2016 Apr
TI  - Zika Virus and Pregnancy: What Obstetric Health Care Providers Need to Know.
PG  - 642-8
LID - 10.1097/AOG.0000000000001378 [doi]
AB  - Zika virus is a flavivirus transmitted by Aedes (Stegomyia) species of
      mosquitoes. In May 2015, the World Health Organization confirmed the first local 
      transmission of Zika virus in the Americas in Brazil. The virus has spread
      rapidly to other countries in the Americas; as of January 29, 2016, local
      transmission has been detected in at least 22 countries or territories, including
      the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Zika virus can
      infect pregnant women in all three trimesters. Although pregnant women do not
      appear to be more susceptible to or more severely affected by Zika virus
      infection, maternal-fetal transmission has been documented. Several pieces of
      evidence suggest that maternal Zika virus infection is associated with adverse
      neonatal outcomes, most notably microcephaly. Because of the number of countries 
      and territories with local Zika virus transmission, it is likely that obstetric
      health care providers will care for pregnant women who live in or have traveled
      to an area of local Zika virus transmission. We review information on Zika virus,
      its clinical presentation, modes of transmission, laboratory testing, effects
      during pregnancy, and methods of prevention to assist obstetric health care
      providers in caring for pregnant women considering travel or with a history of
      travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission and pregnant women residing 
      in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission.
FAU - Meaney-Delman, Dana
AU  - Meaney-Delman D
AD  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.
FAU - Rasmussen, Sonja A
AU  - Rasmussen SA
FAU - Staples, J Erin
AU  - Staples JE
FAU - Oduyebo, Titilope
AU  - Oduyebo T
FAU - Ellington, Sascha R
AU  - Ellington SR
FAU - Petersen, Emily E
AU  - Petersen EE
FAU - Fischer, Marc
AU  - Fischer M
FAU - Jamieson, Denise J
AU  - Jamieson DJ
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - Obstet Gynecol
JT  - Obstetrics and gynecology
JID - 0401101
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Brazil
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant, Newborn
MH  - Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/*prevention & control
MH  - Microcephaly/prevention & control/virology
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control/*virology
MH  - Puerto Rico
MH  - Travel
MH  - United States Virgin Islands
MH  - *Zika Virus
MH  - Zika Virus Infection/complications/*transmission
EDAT- 2016/02/19 06:00
MHDA- 2016/08/09 06:00
CRDT- 2016/02/19 06:00
AID - 10.1097/AOG.0000000000001378 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Obstet Gynecol. 2016 Apr;127(4):642-8. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000001378.

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