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Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women and Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States, 2016.

Abstract CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women during a Zika virus outbreak (1). Updated guidelines include a new recommendation to offer serologic testing to asymptomatic pregnant women (women who do not report clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease) who have traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. Testing can be offered 2-12 weeks after pregnant women return from travel. This update also expands guidance to women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, and includes recommendations for screening, testing, and management of pregnant women and recommendations for counseling women of reproductive age (15-44 years). Pregnant women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission have an ongoing risk for infection throughout their pregnancy. For pregnant women with clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease,* testing is recommended during the first week of illness. For asymptomatic pregnant women residing in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, testing is recommended at the initiation of prenatal care with follow-up testing mid-second trimester. Local health officials should determine when to implement testing of asymptomatic pregnant women based on information about levels of Zika virus transmission and laboratory capacity. Health care providers should discuss reproductive life plans, including pregnancy intention and timing, with women of reproductive age in the context of the potential risks associated with Zika virus infection.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Health Personnel

Practice Guidelines as Topic

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start
%A Oduyebo, Titilope; Petersen, Emily E.; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Mead, Paul S.; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Renquist, Christina M.; Ellington, Sascha R.; Fischer, Marc; Staples, J. Erin; Powers, Ann M.; Villanueva, Julie; Galang, Romeo R.; Dieke, Ada; Mu?oz, Jorge L.; Honein, Margaret A.; Jamieson, Denise J.
%T Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women and Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States, 2016.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, vol. 65, no. 5, pp. 122-127
%D 02/2016
%V 65
%N 5
%M eng
%B CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women during a Zika virus outbreak (1). Updated guidelines include a new recommendation to offer serologic testing to asymptomatic pregnant women (women who do not report clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease) who have traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. Testing can be offered 2-12 weeks after pregnant women return from travel. This update also expands guidance to women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, and includes recommendations for screening, testing, and management of pregnant women and recommendations for counseling women of reproductive age (15-44 years). Pregnant women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission have an ongoing risk for infection throughout their pregnancy. For pregnant women with clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease,* testing is recommended during the first week of illness. For asymptomatic pregnant women residing in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, testing is recommended at the initiation of prenatal care with follow-up testing mid-second trimester. Local health officials should determine when to implement testing of asymptomatic pregnant women based on information about levels of Zika virus transmission and laboratory capacity. Health care providers should discuss reproductive life plans, including pregnancy intention and timing, with women of reproductive age in the context of the potential risks associated with Zika virus infection.
%K Adolescent, Adult, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.), Diagnostic Tests, Routine, Disease Outbreaks, Female, Health Personnel, Humans, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Residence Characteristics, Travel, United States, Young Adult, Zika Virus Infection
%P 122
%L 127
%Y 10.15585/mmwr.mm6505e2
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2016.......65..122O

@Article{Oduyebo2016,
author="Oduyebo, Titilope
and Petersen, Emily E.
and Rasmussen, Sonja A.
and Mead, Paul S.
and Meaney-Delman, Dana
and Renquist, Christina M.
and Ellington, Sascha R.
and Fischer, Marc
and Staples, J. Erin
and Powers, Ann M.
and Villanueva, Julie
and Galang, Romeo R.
and Dieke, Ada
and Mu{\~n}oz, Jorge L.
and Honein, Margaret A.
and Jamieson, Denise J.",
title="Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women and Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States, 2016.",
journal="MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report",
year="2016",
month="Feb",
day="12",
volume="65",
number="5",
pages="122--127",
keywords="Adolescent",
keywords="Adult",
keywords="Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)",
keywords="Diagnostic Tests, Routine",
keywords="Disease Outbreaks",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Health Personnel",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Practice Guidelines as Topic",
keywords="Pregnancy",
keywords="Pregnancy Complications, Infectious",
keywords="Residence Characteristics",
keywords="Travel",
keywords="United States",
keywords="Young Adult",
keywords="Zika Virus Infection",
abstract="CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women during a Zika virus outbreak (1). Updated guidelines include a new recommendation to offer serologic testing to asymptomatic pregnant women (women who do not report clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease) who have traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. Testing can be offered 2-12 weeks after pregnant women return from travel. This update also expands guidance to women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, and includes recommendations for screening, testing, and management of pregnant women and recommendations for counseling women of reproductive age (15-44 years). Pregnant women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission have an ongoing risk for infection throughout their pregnancy. For pregnant women with clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease,* testing is recommended during the first week of illness. For asymptomatic pregnant women residing in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, testing is recommended at the initiation of prenatal care with follow-up testing mid-second trimester. Local health officials should determine when to implement testing of asymptomatic pregnant women based on information about levels of Zika virus transmission and laboratory capacity. Health care providers should discuss reproductive life plans, including pregnancy intention and timing, with women of reproductive age in the context of the potential risks associated with Zika virus infection.",
issn="1545-861X",
doi="10.15585/mmwr.mm6505e2",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26866840",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women and Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States, 2016.
%A Oduyebo, Titilope
%A Petersen, Emily E.
%A Rasmussen, Sonja A.
%A Mead, Paul S.
%A Meaney-Delman, Dana
%A Renquist, Christina M.
%A Ellington, Sascha R.
%A Fischer, Marc
%A Staples, J. Erin
%A Powers, Ann M.
%A Villanueva, Julie
%A Galang, Romeo R.
%A Dieke, Ada
%A Mu?oz, Jorge L.
%A Honein, Margaret A.
%A Jamieson, Denise J.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
%D 2016
%8 Feb 12
%V 65
%N 5
%@ 1545-861X
%G eng
%F Oduyebo2016
%X CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women during a Zika virus outbreak (1). Updated guidelines include a new recommendation to offer serologic testing to asymptomatic pregnant women (women who do not report clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease) who have traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. Testing can be offered 2-12 weeks after pregnant women return from travel. This update also expands guidance to women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, and includes recommendations for screening, testing, and management of pregnant women and recommendations for counseling women of reproductive age (15-44 years). Pregnant women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission have an ongoing risk for infection throughout their pregnancy. For pregnant women with clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease,* testing is recommended during the first week of illness. For asymptomatic pregnant women residing in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, testing is recommended at the initiation of prenatal care with follow-up testing mid-second trimester. Local health officials should determine when to implement testing of asymptomatic pregnant women based on information about levels of Zika virus transmission and laboratory capacity. Health care providers should discuss reproductive life plans, including pregnancy intention and timing, with women of reproductive age in the context of the potential risks associated with Zika virus infection.
%K Adolescent
%K Adult
%K Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
%K Diagnostic Tests, Routine
%K Disease Outbreaks
%K Female
%K Health Personnel
%K Humans
%K Practice Guidelines as Topic
%K Pregnancy
%K Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
%K Residence Characteristics
%K Travel
%K United States
%K Young Adult
%K Zika Virus Infection
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6505e2
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26866840
%P 122-127

PT Journal
AU Oduyebo, T
   Petersen, EE
   Rasmussen, SA
   Mead, PS
   Meaney-Delman, D
   Renquist, CM
   Ellington, SR
   Fischer, M
   Staples, JE
   Powers, AM
   Villanueva, J
   Galang, RR
   Dieke, A
   Mu?oz, JL
   Honein, MA
   Jamieson, DJ
TI Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women and Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States, 2016.
SO MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JI MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
PD Feb
PY 2016
BP 122
EP 127
VL 65
IS 5
DI 10.15585/mmwr.mm6505e2
LA eng
DE Adolescent; Adult; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.); Diagnostic Tests, Routine; Disease Outbreaks; Female; Health Personnel; Humans; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications, Infectious; Residence Characteristics; Travel; United States; Young Adult; Zika Virus Infection
AB CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women during a Zika virus outbreak (1). Updated guidelines include a new recommendation to offer serologic testing to asymptomatic pregnant women (women who do not report clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease) who have traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. Testing can be offered 2-12 weeks after pregnant women return from travel. This update also expands guidance to women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, and includes recommendations for screening, testing, and management of pregnant women and recommendations for counseling women of reproductive age (15-44 years). Pregnant women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission have an ongoing risk for infection throughout their pregnancy. For pregnant women with clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease,* testing is recommended during the first week of illness. For asymptomatic pregnant women residing in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, testing is recommended at the initiation of prenatal care with follow-up testing mid-second trimester. Local health officials should determine when to implement testing of asymptomatic pregnant women based on information about levels of Zika virus transmission and laboratory capacity. Health care providers should discuss reproductive life plans, including pregnancy intention and timing, with women of reproductive age in the context of the potential risks associated with Zika virus infection.
ER

PMID- 26866840
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20160212
DCOM- 20160613
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 65
IP  - 5
DP  - 2016 Feb 12
TI  - Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women
      and Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States, 
      2016.
PG  - 122-7
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6505e2 [doi]
AB  - CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for 
      pregnant women during a Zika virus outbreak (1). Updated guidelines include a new
      recommendation to offer serologic testing to asymptomatic pregnant women (women
      who do not report clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease) who have
      traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. Testing can be offered
      2-12 weeks after pregnant women return from travel. This update also expands
      guidance to women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, and
      includes recommendations for screening, testing, and management of pregnant women
      and recommendations for counseling women of reproductive age (15-44 years).
      Pregnant women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission have an
      ongoing risk for infection throughout their pregnancy. For pregnant women with
      clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease,* testing is recommended
      during the first week of illness. For asymptomatic pregnant women residing in
      areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, testing is recommended at the
      initiation of prenatal care with follow-up testing mid-second trimester. Local
      health officials should determine when to implement testing of asymptomatic
      pregnant women based on information about levels of Zika virus transmission and
      laboratory capacity. Health care providers should discuss reproductive life
      plans, including pregnancy intention and timing, with women of reproductive age
      in the context of the potential risks associated with Zika virus infection.
FAU - Oduyebo, Titilope
AU  - Oduyebo T
FAU - Petersen, Emily E
AU  - Petersen EE
FAU - Rasmussen, Sonja A
AU  - Rasmussen SA
FAU - Mead, Paul S
AU  - Mead PS
FAU - Meaney-Delman, Dana
AU  - Meaney-Delman D
FAU - Renquist, Christina M
AU  - Renquist CM
FAU - Ellington, Sascha R
AU  - Ellington SR
FAU - Fischer, Marc
AU  - Fischer M
FAU - Staples, J Erin
AU  - Staples JE
FAU - Powers, Ann M
AU  - Powers AM
FAU - Villanueva, Julie
AU  - Villanueva J
FAU - Galang, Romeo R
AU  - Galang RR
FAU - Dieke, Ada
AU  - Dieke A
FAU - Munoz, Jorge L
AU  - Munoz JL
FAU - Honein, Margaret A
AU  - Honein MA
FAU - Jamieson, Denise J
AU  - Jamieson DJ
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160212
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
MH  - Diagnostic Tests, Routine/standards
MH  - Disease Outbreaks/*prevention & control
MH  - Female
MH  - *Health Personnel
MH  - Humans
MH  - *Practice Guidelines as Topic
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/*prevention & control
MH  - Residence Characteristics/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Travel/statistics & numerical data
MH  - United States/epidemiology
MH  - Young Adult
MH  - Zika Virus Infection/*prevention & control/transmission
EDAT- 2016/02/13 06:00
MHDA- 2016/06/14 06:00
CRDT- 2016/02/12 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6505e2 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016 Feb 12;65(5):122-7. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6505e2.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Oduyebo, Titilope
AU  - Petersen, Emily E.
AU  - Rasmussen, Sonja A.
AU  - Mead, Paul S.
AU  - Meaney-Delman, Dana
AU  - Renquist, Christina M.
AU  - Ellington, Sascha R.
AU  - Fischer, Marc
AU  - Staples, J. Erin
AU  - Powers, Ann M.
AU  - Villanueva, Julie
AU  - Galang, Romeo R.
AU  - Dieke, Ada
AU  - Mu?oz, Jorge L.
AU  - Honein, Margaret A.
AU  - Jamieson, Denise J.
PY  - 2016/Feb/12
TI  - Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women and Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States, 2016.
T2  - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
JO  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
SP  - 122
EP  - 127
VL  - 65
IS  - 5
KW  - Adolescent
KW  - Adult
KW  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
KW  - Diagnostic Tests, Routine
KW  - Disease Outbreaks
KW  - Female
KW  - Health Personnel
KW  - Humans
KW  - Practice Guidelines as Topic
KW  - Pregnancy
KW  - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
KW  - Residence Characteristics
KW  - Travel
KW  - United States
KW  - Young Adult
KW  - Zika Virus Infection
N2  - CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women during a Zika virus outbreak (1). Updated guidelines include a new recommendation to offer serologic testing to asymptomatic pregnant women (women who do not report clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease) who have traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. Testing can be offered 2-12 weeks after pregnant women return from travel. This update also expands guidance to women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, and includes recommendations for screening, testing, and management of pregnant women and recommendations for counseling women of reproductive age (15-44 years). Pregnant women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission have an ongoing risk for infection throughout their pregnancy. For pregnant women with clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease,* testing is recommended during the first week of illness. For asymptomatic pregnant women residing in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, testing is recommended at the initiation of prenatal care with follow-up testing mid-second trimester. Local health officials should determine when to implement testing of asymptomatic pregnant women based on information about levels of Zika virus transmission and laboratory capacity. Health care providers should discuss reproductive life plans, including pregnancy intention and timing, with women of reproductive age in the context of the potential risks associated with Zika virus infection.
SN  - 1545-861X
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6505e2
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26866840
ID  - Oduyebo2016
ER  - 
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<b:Title>Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women and Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States, 2016.</b:Title>
 <b:ShortTitle>MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.</b:ShortTitle>
<b:Comments>CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women during a Zika virus outbreak (1). Updated guidelines include a new recommendation to offer serologic testing to asymptomatic pregnant women (women who do not report clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease) who have traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. Testing can be offered 2-12 weeks after pregnant women return from travel. This update also expands guidance to women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, and includes recommendations for screening, testing, and management of pregnant women and recommendations for counseling women of reproductive age (15-44 years). Pregnant women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission have an ongoing risk for infection throughout their pregnancy. For pregnant women with clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease,* testing is recommended during the first week of illness. For asymptomatic pregnant women residing in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, testing is recommended at the initiation of prenatal care with follow-up testing mid-second trimester. Local health officials should determine when to implement testing of asymptomatic pregnant women based on information about levels of Zika virus transmission and laboratory capacity. Health care providers should discuss reproductive life plans, including pregnancy intention and timing, with women of reproductive age in the context of the potential risks associated with Zika virus infection.</b:Comments>
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