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Interim Guidelines for the Evaluation and Testing of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection - United States, 2016.

Abstract CDC has developed interim guidelines for health care providers in the United States who are caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy. These guidelines include recommendations for the testing and management of these infants. Guidance is subject to change as more information becomes available; the latest information, including answers to commonly asked questions, can be found online (http://www.cdc.gov/zika). Pediatric health care providers should work closely with obstetric providers to identify infants whose mothers were potentially infected with Zika virus during pregnancy (based on travel to or residence in an area with Zika virus transmission [http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices]), and review fetal ultrasounds and maternal testing for Zika virus infection (see Interim Guidelines for Pregnant Women During a Zika Virus Outbreak*) (1). Zika virus testing is recommended for 1) infants with microcephaly or intracranial calcifications born to women who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission while pregnant; or 2) infants born to mothers with positive or inconclusive test results for Zika virus infection. For infants with laboratory evidence of a possible congenital Zika virus infection, additional clinical evaluation and follow-up is recommended. Health care providers should contact their state or territorial health department to facilitate testing. As an arboviral disease, Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Practice Guidelines as Topic

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start
%A Staples, J. Erin; Dziuban, Eric J.; Fischer, Marc; Cragan, Janet D.; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Cannon, Michael J.; Frey, Meghan T.; Renquist, Christina M.; Lanciotti, Robert S.; Mu?oz, Jorge L.; Powers, Ann M.; Honein, Margaret A.; Moore, Cynthia A.
%T Interim Guidelines for the Evaluation and Testing of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection - United States, 2016.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, vol. 65, no. 3, pp. 63-67
%D 01/2016
%V 65
%N 3
%M eng
%B CDC has developed interim guidelines for health care providers in the United States who are caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy. These guidelines include recommendations for the testing and management of these infants. Guidance is subject to change as more information becomes available; the latest information, including answers to commonly asked questions, can be found online (http://www.cdc.gov/zika). Pediatric health care providers should work closely with obstetric providers to identify infants whose mothers were potentially infected with Zika virus during pregnancy (based on travel to or residence in an area with Zika virus transmission [http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices]), and review fetal ultrasounds and maternal testing for Zika virus infection (see Interim Guidelines for Pregnant Women During a Zika Virus Outbreak*) (1). Zika virus testing is recommended for 1) infants with microcephaly or intracranial calcifications born to women who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission while pregnant; or 2) infants born to mothers with positive or inconclusive test results for Zika virus infection. For infants with laboratory evidence of a possible congenital Zika virus infection, additional clinical evaluation and follow-up is recommended. Health care providers should contact their state or territorial health department to facilitate testing. As an arboviral disease, Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition.
%K Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.), Female, Humans, Infant, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, United States, Zika Virus Infection
%P 63
%L 67
%Y 10.15585/mmwr.mm6503e3
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2016.......65...63S

@Article{Staples2016,
author="Staples, J. Erin
and Dziuban, Eric J.
and Fischer, Marc
and Cragan, Janet D.
and Rasmussen, Sonja A.
and Cannon, Michael J.
and Frey, Meghan T.
and Renquist, Christina M.
and Lanciotti, Robert S.
and Mu{\~n}oz, Jorge L.
and Powers, Ann M.
and Honein, Margaret A.
and Moore, Cynthia A.",
title="Interim Guidelines for the Evaluation and Testing of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection - United States, 2016.",
journal="MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report",
year="2016",
month="Jan",
day="29",
volume="65",
number="3",
pages="63--67",
keywords="Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Infant",
keywords="Practice Guidelines as Topic",
keywords="Pregnancy",
keywords="Pregnancy Complications, Infectious",
keywords="United States",
keywords="Zika Virus Infection",
abstract="CDC has developed interim guidelines for health care providers in the United States who are caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy. These guidelines include recommendations for the testing and management of these infants. Guidance is subject to change as more information becomes available; the latest information, including answers to commonly asked questions, can be found online (http://www.cdc.gov/zika). Pediatric health care providers should work closely with obstetric providers to identify infants whose mothers were potentially infected with Zika virus during pregnancy (based on travel to or residence in an area with Zika virus transmission [http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices]), and review fetal ultrasounds and maternal testing for Zika virus infection (see Interim Guidelines for Pregnant Women During a Zika Virus Outbreak*) (1). Zika virus testing is recommended for 1) infants with microcephaly or intracranial calcifications born to women who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission while pregnant; or 2) infants born to mothers with positive or inconclusive test results for Zika virus infection. For infants with laboratory evidence of a possible congenital Zika virus infection, additional clinical evaluation and follow-up is recommended. Health care providers should contact their state or territorial health department to facilitate testing. As an arboviral disease, Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition.",
issn="1545-861X",
doi="10.15585/mmwr.mm6503e3",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26820387",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Interim Guidelines for the Evaluation and Testing of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection - United States, 2016.
%A Staples, J. Erin
%A Dziuban, Eric J.
%A Fischer, Marc
%A Cragan, Janet D.
%A Rasmussen, Sonja A.
%A Cannon, Michael J.
%A Frey, Meghan T.
%A Renquist, Christina M.
%A Lanciotti, Robert S.
%A Mu?oz, Jorge L.
%A Powers, Ann M.
%A Honein, Margaret A.
%A Moore, Cynthia A.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
%D 2016
%8 January 29
%V 65
%N 3
%@ 1545-861X
%G eng
%F Staples2016
%X CDC has developed interim guidelines for health care providers in the United States who are caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy. These guidelines include recommendations for the testing and management of these infants. Guidance is subject to change as more information becomes available; the latest information, including answers to commonly asked questions, can be found online (http://www.cdc.gov/zika). Pediatric health care providers should work closely with obstetric providers to identify infants whose mothers were potentially infected with Zika virus during pregnancy (based on travel to or residence in an area with Zika virus transmission [http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices]), and review fetal ultrasounds and maternal testing for Zika virus infection (see Interim Guidelines for Pregnant Women During a Zika Virus Outbreak*) (1). Zika virus testing is recommended for 1) infants with microcephaly or intracranial calcifications born to women who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission while pregnant; or 2) infants born to mothers with positive or inconclusive test results for Zika virus infection. For infants with laboratory evidence of a possible congenital Zika virus infection, additional clinical evaluation and follow-up is recommended. Health care providers should contact their state or territorial health department to facilitate testing. As an arboviral disease, Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition.
%K Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
%K Female
%K Humans
%K Infant
%K Practice Guidelines as Topic
%K Pregnancy
%K Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
%K United States
%K Zika Virus Infection
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6503e3
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26820387
%P 63-67

PT Journal
AU Staples, JE
   Dziuban, EJ
   Fischer, M
   Cragan, JD
   Rasmussen, SA
   Cannon, MJ
   Frey, MT
   Renquist, CM
   Lanciotti, RS
   Mu?oz, JL
   Powers, AM
   Honein, MA
   Moore, CA
TI Interim Guidelines for the Evaluation and Testing of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection - United States, 2016.
SO MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JI MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
PD 01
PY 2016
BP 63
EP 67
VL 65
IS 3
DI 10.15585/mmwr.mm6503e3
LA eng
DE Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.); Female; Humans; Infant; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications, Infectious; United States; Zika Virus Infection
AB CDC has developed interim guidelines for health care providers in the United States who are caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy. These guidelines include recommendations for the testing and management of these infants. Guidance is subject to change as more information becomes available; the latest information, including answers to commonly asked questions, can be found online (http://www.cdc.gov/zika). Pediatric health care providers should work closely with obstetric providers to identify infants whose mothers were potentially infected with Zika virus during pregnancy (based on travel to or residence in an area with Zika virus transmission [http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices]), and review fetal ultrasounds and maternal testing for Zika virus infection (see Interim Guidelines for Pregnant Women During a Zika Virus Outbreak*) (1). Zika virus testing is recommended for 1) infants with microcephaly or intracranial calcifications born to women who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission while pregnant; or 2) infants born to mothers with positive or inconclusive test results for Zika virus infection. For infants with laboratory evidence of a possible congenital Zika virus infection, additional clinical evaluation and follow-up is recommended. Health care providers should contact their state or territorial health department to facilitate testing. As an arboviral disease, Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition.
ER

PMID- 26820387
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20160129
DCOM- 20160531
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 65
IP  - 3
DP  - 2016
TI  - Interim Guidelines for the Evaluation and Testing of Infants with Possible
      Congenital Zika Virus Infection - United States, 2016.
PG  - 63-7
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6503e3 [doi]
AB  - CDC has developed interim guidelines for health care providers in the United
      States who are caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in
      an area with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy. These guidelines include
      recommendations for the testing and management of these infants. Guidance is
      subject to change as more information becomes available; the latest information, 
      including answers to commonly asked questions, can be found online
      (http://www.cdc.gov/zika). Pediatric health care providers should work closely
      with obstetric providers to identify infants whose mothers were potentially
      infected with Zika virus during pregnancy (based on travel to or residence in an 
      area with Zika virus transmission [http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices]), and
      review fetal ultrasounds and maternal testing for Zika virus infection (see
      Interim Guidelines for Pregnant Women During a Zika Virus Outbreak*) (1). Zika
      virus testing is recommended for 1) infants with microcephaly or intracranial
      calcifications born to women who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika
      virus transmission while pregnant; or 2) infants born to mothers with positive or
      inconclusive test results for Zika virus infection. For infants with laboratory
      evidence of a possible congenital Zika virus infection, additional clinical
      evaluation and follow-up is recommended. Health care providers should contact
      their state or territorial health department to facilitate testing. As an
      arboviral disease, Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition.
FAU - Staples, J Erin
AU  - Staples JE
FAU - Dziuban, Eric J
AU  - Dziuban EJ
FAU - Fischer, Marc
AU  - Fischer M
FAU - Cragan, Janet D
AU  - Cragan JD
FAU - Rasmussen, Sonja A
AU  - Rasmussen SA
FAU - Cannon, Michael J
AU  - Cannon MJ
FAU - Frey, Meghan T
AU  - Frey MT
FAU - Renquist, Christina M
AU  - Renquist CM
FAU - Lanciotti, Robert S
AU  - Lanciotti RS
FAU - Munoz, Jorge L
AU  - Munoz JL
FAU - Powers, Ann M
AU  - Powers AM
FAU - Honein, Margaret A
AU  - Honein MA
FAU - Moore, Cynthia A
AU  - Moore CA
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160129
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant
MH  - *Practice Guidelines as Topic
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
MH  - United States
MH  - Zika Virus Infection/*congenital/*diagnosis
EDAT- 2016/01/29 06:00
MHDA- 2016/06/01 06:00
CRDT- 2016/01/29 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6503e3 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016 Jan 29;65(3):63-7. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6503e3.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Staples, J. Erin
AU  - Dziuban, Eric J.
AU  - Fischer, Marc
AU  - Cragan, Janet D.
AU  - Rasmussen, Sonja A.
AU  - Cannon, Michael J.
AU  - Frey, Meghan T.
AU  - Renquist, Christina M.
AU  - Lanciotti, Robert S.
AU  - Mu?oz, Jorge L.
AU  - Powers, Ann M.
AU  - Honein, Margaret A.
AU  - Moore, Cynthia A.
PY  - 2016/01/29
TI  - Interim Guidelines for the Evaluation and Testing of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection - United States, 2016.
T2  - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
JO  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
SP  - 63
EP  - 67
VL  - 65
IS  - 3
KW  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
KW  - Female
KW  - Humans
KW  - Infant
KW  - Practice Guidelines as Topic
KW  - Pregnancy
KW  - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
KW  - United States
KW  - Zika Virus Infection
N2  - CDC has developed interim guidelines for health care providers in the United States who are caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy. These guidelines include recommendations for the testing and management of these infants. Guidance is subject to change as more information becomes available; the latest information, including answers to commonly asked questions, can be found online (http://www.cdc.gov/zika). Pediatric health care providers should work closely with obstetric providers to identify infants whose mothers were potentially infected with Zika virus during pregnancy (based on travel to or residence in an area with Zika virus transmission [http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices]), and review fetal ultrasounds and maternal testing for Zika virus infection (see Interim Guidelines for Pregnant Women During a Zika Virus Outbreak*) (1). Zika virus testing is recommended for 1) infants with microcephaly or intracranial calcifications born to women who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission while pregnant; or 2) infants born to mothers with positive or inconclusive test results for Zika virus infection. For infants with laboratory evidence of a possible congenital Zika virus infection, additional clinical evaluation and follow-up is recommended. Health care providers should contact their state or territorial health department to facilitate testing. As an arboviral disease, Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition.
SN  - 1545-861X
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6503e3
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26820387
ID  - Staples2016
ER  - 
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<b:Title>Interim Guidelines for the Evaluation and Testing of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection - United States, 2016.</b:Title>
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