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Concurrent Outbreaks of St. Louis Encephalitis Virus and West Nile Virus Disease - Arizona, 2015.

Abstract St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) are closely related mosquito-borne flaviviruses that can cause outbreaks of acute febrile illness and neurologic disease. Both viruses are endemic throughout much of the United States and have the same Culex species mosquito vectors and avian hosts (1); however, since WNV was first identified in the United States in 1999, SLEV disease incidence has been substantially lower than WNV disease incidence, and no outbreaks involving the two viruses circulating in the same location at the same time have been identified. Currently, there is a commercially available laboratory test for diagnosis of acute WNV infection, but there is no commercially available SLEV test, and all SLEV testing must be performed at public health laboratories. In addition, because antibodies against SLEV and WNV can cross-react on standard diagnostic tests, confirmatory neutralizing antibody testing at public health laboratories is usually required to determine the flavivirus species (2). This report describes the first known concurrent outbreaks of SLEV and WNV disease in the United States.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Disease Outbreaks

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start
%A Venkat, Heather; Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth; Hennessey, Morgan; Jones, Jefferson; Adams, Laura; Fischer, Marc; Sylvester, Tammy; Levy, Craig; Smith, Kirk; Plante, Lydia; Komatsu, Kenneth; Staples, J. Erin; Hills, Susan
%T Concurrent Outbreaks of St. Louis Encephalitis Virus and West Nile Virus Disease - Arizona, 2015.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, vol. 64, no. 48, pp. 1349-1350
%D 12/2015
%V 64
%N 48
%M eng
%B St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) are closely related mosquito-borne flaviviruses that can cause outbreaks of acute febrile illness and neurologic disease. Both viruses are endemic throughout much of the United States and have the same Culex species mosquito vectors and avian hosts (1); however, since WNV was first identified in the United States in 1999, SLEV disease incidence has been substantially lower than WNV disease incidence, and no outbreaks involving the two viruses circulating in the same location at the same time have been identified. Currently, there is a commercially available laboratory test for diagnosis of acute WNV infection, but there is no commercially available SLEV test, and all SLEV testing must be performed at public health laboratories. In addition, because antibodies against SLEV and WNV can cross-react on standard diagnostic tests, confirmatory neutralizing antibody testing at public health laboratories is usually required to determine the flavivirus species (2). This report describes the first known concurrent outbreaks of SLEV and WNV disease in the United States.
%K Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Arizona, Disease Outbreaks, Encephalitis, St. Louis, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, West Nile Fever, Young Adult
%P 1349
%L 1350
%Y 10.15585/mmwr.mm6448a5
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2015.......64.1349V

@Article{Venkat2015,
author="Venkat, Heather
and Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth
and Hennessey, Morgan
and Jones, Jefferson
and Adams, Laura
and Fischer, Marc
and Sylvester, Tammy
and Levy, Craig
and Smith, Kirk
and Plante, Lydia
and Komatsu, Kenneth
and Staples, J. Erin
and Hills, Susan",
title="Concurrent Outbreaks of St. Louis Encephalitis Virus and West Nile Virus Disease - Arizona, 2015.",
journal="MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report",
year="2015",
month="Dec",
day="11",
volume="64",
number="48",
pages="1349--1350",
keywords="Adult",
keywords="Aged",
keywords="Aged, 80 and over",
keywords="Arizona",
keywords="Disease Outbreaks",
keywords="Encephalitis, St. Louis",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Male",
keywords="Middle Aged",
keywords="West Nile Fever",
keywords="Young Adult",
abstract="St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) are closely related mosquito-borne flaviviruses that can cause outbreaks of acute febrile illness and neurologic disease. Both viruses are endemic throughout much of the United States and have the same Culex species mosquito vectors and avian hosts (1); however, since WNV was first identified in the United States in 1999, SLEV disease incidence has been substantially lower than WNV disease incidence, and no outbreaks involving the two viruses circulating in the same location at the same time have been identified. Currently, there is a commercially available laboratory test for diagnosis of acute WNV infection, but there is no commercially available SLEV test, and all SLEV testing must be performed at public health laboratories. In addition, because antibodies against SLEV and WNV can cross-react on standard diagnostic tests, confirmatory neutralizing antibody testing at public health laboratories is usually required to determine the flavivirus species (2). This report describes the first known concurrent outbreaks of SLEV and WNV disease in the United States.",
issn="1545-861X",
doi="10.15585/mmwr.mm6448a5",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26656306",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Concurrent Outbreaks of St. Louis Encephalitis Virus and West Nile Virus Disease - Arizona, 2015.
%A Venkat, Heather
%A Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth
%A Hennessey, Morgan
%A Jones, Jefferson
%A Adams, Laura
%A Fischer, Marc
%A Sylvester, Tammy
%A Levy, Craig
%A Smith, Kirk
%A Plante, Lydia
%A Komatsu, Kenneth
%A Staples, J. Erin
%A Hills, Susan
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
%D 2015
%8 Dec 11
%V 64
%N 48
%@ 1545-861X
%G eng
%F Venkat2015
%X St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) are closely related mosquito-borne flaviviruses that can cause outbreaks of acute febrile illness and neurologic disease. Both viruses are endemic throughout much of the United States and have the same Culex species mosquito vectors and avian hosts (1); however, since WNV was first identified in the United States in 1999, SLEV disease incidence has been substantially lower than WNV disease incidence, and no outbreaks involving the two viruses circulating in the same location at the same time have been identified. Currently, there is a commercially available laboratory test for diagnosis of acute WNV infection, but there is no commercially available SLEV test, and all SLEV testing must be performed at public health laboratories. In addition, because antibodies against SLEV and WNV can cross-react on standard diagnostic tests, confirmatory neutralizing antibody testing at public health laboratories is usually required to determine the flavivirus species (2). This report describes the first known concurrent outbreaks of SLEV and WNV disease in the United States.
%K Adult
%K Aged
%K Aged, 80 and over
%K Arizona
%K Disease Outbreaks
%K Encephalitis, St. Louis
%K Female
%K Humans
%K Male
%K Middle Aged
%K West Nile Fever
%K Young Adult
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6448a5
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26656306
%P 1349-1350

PT Journal
AU Venkat, H
   Krow-Lucal, E
   Hennessey, M
   Jones, J
   Adams, L
   Fischer, M
   Sylvester, T
   Levy, C
   Smith, K
   Plante, L
   Komatsu, K
   Staples, JE
   Hills, S
TI Concurrent Outbreaks of St. Louis Encephalitis Virus and West Nile Virus Disease - Arizona, 2015.
SO MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JI MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
PD Dec
PY 2015
BP 1349
EP 1350
VL 64
IS 48
DI 10.15585/mmwr.mm6448a5
LA eng
DE Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Arizona; Disease Outbreaks; Encephalitis, St. Louis; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; West Nile Fever; Young Adult
AB St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) are closely related mosquito-borne flaviviruses that can cause outbreaks of acute febrile illness and neurologic disease. Both viruses are endemic throughout much of the United States and have the same Culex species mosquito vectors and avian hosts (1); however, since WNV was first identified in the United States in 1999, SLEV disease incidence has been substantially lower than WNV disease incidence, and no outbreaks involving the two viruses circulating in the same location at the same time have been identified. Currently, there is a commercially available laboratory test for diagnosis of acute WNV infection, but there is no commercially available SLEV test, and all SLEV testing must be performed at public health laboratories. In addition, because antibodies against SLEV and WNV can cross-react on standard diagnostic tests, confirmatory neutralizing antibody testing at public health laboratories is usually required to determine the flavivirus species (2). This report describes the first known concurrent outbreaks of SLEV and WNV disease in the United States.
ER

PMID- 26656306
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20151215
DCOM- 20160407
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 64
IP  - 48
DP  - 2015 Dec 11
TI  - Concurrent Outbreaks of St. Louis Encephalitis Virus and West Nile Virus Disease 
      - Arizona, 2015.
PG  - 1349-50
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6448a5 [doi]
AB  - St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) are closely related
      mosquito-borne flaviviruses that can cause outbreaks of acute febrile illness and
      neurologic disease. Both viruses are endemic throughout much of the United States
      and have the same Culex species mosquito vectors and avian hosts (1); however,
      since WNV was first identified in the United States in 1999, SLEV disease
      incidence has been substantially lower than WNV disease incidence, and no
      outbreaks involving the two viruses circulating in the same location at the same 
      time have been identified. Currently, there is a commercially available
      laboratory test for diagnosis of acute WNV infection, but there is no
      commercially available SLEV test, and all SLEV testing must be performed at
      public health laboratories. In addition, because antibodies against SLEV and WNV 
      can cross-react on standard diagnostic tests, confirmatory neutralizing antibody 
      testing at public health laboratories is usually required to determine the
      flavivirus species (2). This report describes the first known concurrent
      outbreaks of SLEV and WNV disease in the United States.
FAU - Venkat, Heather
AU  - Venkat H
FAU - Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth
AU  - Krow-Lucal E
FAU - Hennessey, Morgan
AU  - Hennessey M
FAU - Jones, Jefferson
AU  - Jones J
FAU - Adams, Laura
AU  - Adams L
FAU - Fischer, Marc
AU  - Fischer M
FAU - Sylvester, Tammy
AU  - Sylvester T
FAU - Levy, Craig
AU  - Levy C
FAU - Smith, Kirk
AU  - Smith K
FAU - Plante, Lydia
AU  - Plante L
FAU - Komatsu, Kenneth
AU  - Komatsu K
FAU - Staples, J Erin
AU  - Staples JE
FAU - Hills, Susan
AU  - Hills S
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20151211
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Arizona/epidemiology
MH  - *Disease Outbreaks
MH  - Encephalitis, St. Louis/*epidemiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - West Nile Fever/*epidemiology
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2015/12/15 06:00
MHDA- 2016/04/08 06:00
CRDT- 2015/12/15 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6448a5 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2015 Dec 11;64(48):1349-50. doi:
      10.15585/mmwr.mm6448a5.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Venkat, Heather
AU  - Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth
AU  - Hennessey, Morgan
AU  - Jones, Jefferson
AU  - Adams, Laura
AU  - Fischer, Marc
AU  - Sylvester, Tammy
AU  - Levy, Craig
AU  - Smith, Kirk
AU  - Plante, Lydia
AU  - Komatsu, Kenneth
AU  - Staples, J. Erin
AU  - Hills, Susan
PY  - 2015/Dec/11
TI  - Concurrent Outbreaks of St. Louis Encephalitis Virus and West Nile Virus Disease - Arizona, 2015.
T2  - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
JO  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
SP  - 1349
EP  - 1350
VL  - 64
IS  - 48
KW  - Adult
KW  - Aged
KW  - Aged, 80 and over
KW  - Arizona
KW  - Disease Outbreaks
KW  - Encephalitis, St. Louis
KW  - Female
KW  - Humans
KW  - Male
KW  - Middle Aged
KW  - West Nile Fever
KW  - Young Adult
N2  - St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) are closely related mosquito-borne flaviviruses that can cause outbreaks of acute febrile illness and neurologic disease. Both viruses are endemic throughout much of the United States and have the same Culex species mosquito vectors and avian hosts (1); however, since WNV was first identified in the United States in 1999, SLEV disease incidence has been substantially lower than WNV disease incidence, and no outbreaks involving the two viruses circulating in the same location at the same time have been identified. Currently, there is a commercially available laboratory test for diagnosis of acute WNV infection, but there is no commercially available SLEV test, and all SLEV testing must be performed at public health laboratories. In addition, because antibodies against SLEV and WNV can cross-react on standard diagnostic tests, confirmatory neutralizing antibody testing at public health laboratories is usually required to determine the flavivirus species (2). This report describes the first known concurrent outbreaks of SLEV and WNV disease in the United States.
SN  - 1545-861X
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6448a5
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26656306
ID  - Venkat2015
ER  - 
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