PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

A Road Map to Address the Social Determinants of Health Through Community Collaboration.

Abstract Economic, environmental, and psychosocial needs are common and wide-ranging among families cared for in primary care settings. Still, pediatric care delivery models are not set up to systematically address these fundamental risks to health. We offer a roadmap to help structure primary care approaches to these needs through the development of comprehensive and effective collaborations between the primary care setting and community partners. We use Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs as a well-recognized conceptual model to organize, prioritize, and determine appropriate interventions that can be adapted to both small and large practices. Specifically, collaborations with community organizations expert in addressing issues commonly encountered in primary care centers can be designed and executed in a phased manner: (1) build the case for action through a family-centered risk assessment, (2) organize and prioritize risks and interventions, (3) develop and sustain interventions, and (4) operationalize interventions in the clinical setting. This phased approach to collaboration also includes shared vision, codeveloped plans for implementation and evaluation, resource alignment, joint reflection and adaptation, and shared decisions regarding next steps. Training, electronic health record integration, refinement by using quality improvement methods, and innovative use of clinical space are important components that may be useful in a variety of clinical settings. Successful examples highlight how clinical-community partnerships can help to systematically address a hierarchy of needs for children and families. Pediatricians and community partners can collaborate to improve the well-being of at-risk children by leveraging their respective strengths and shared vision for healthy families.
PMID
Related Publications

Partnering health disparities research with quality improvement science in pediatrics.

Family pediatrics: report of the Task Force on the Family.

From concept to application: the impact of a community-wide intervention to improve the delivery of preventive services to children.

The national improvement partnership network: state-based partnerships that improve primary care quality.

Integrating the life course into MCH service delivery: from theory to practice.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Needs Assessment

Social Determinants of Health

Keywords
Journal Title pediatrics
Publication Year Start
%A Henize, Adrienne W.; Beck, Andrew F.; Klein, Melissa D.; Adams, Monica; Kahn, Robert S.
%T A Road Map to Address the Social Determinants of Health Through Community Collaboration.
%J Pediatrics, vol. 136, no. 4, pp. e993-1001
%D 10/2015
%V 136
%N 4
%M eng
%B Economic, environmental, and psychosocial needs are common and wide-ranging among families cared for in primary care settings. Still, pediatric care delivery models are not set up to systematically address these fundamental risks to health. We offer a roadmap to help structure primary care approaches to these needs through the development of comprehensive and effective collaborations between the primary care setting and community partners. We use Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs as a well-recognized conceptual model to organize, prioritize, and determine appropriate interventions that can be adapted to both small and large practices. Specifically, collaborations with community organizations expert in addressing issues commonly encountered in primary care centers can be designed and executed in a phased manner: (1) build the case for action through a family-centered risk assessment, (2) organize and prioritize risks and interventions, (3) develop and sustain interventions, and (4) operationalize interventions in the clinical setting. This phased approach to collaboration also includes shared vision, codeveloped plans for implementation and evaluation, resource alignment, joint reflection and adaptation, and shared decisions regarding next steps. Training, electronic health record integration, refinement by using quality improvement methods, and innovative use of clinical space are important components that may be useful in a variety of clinical settings. Successful examples highlight how clinical-community partnerships can help to systematically address a hierarchy of needs for children and families. Pediatricians and community partners can collaborate to improve the well-being of at-risk children by leveraging their respective strengths and shared vision for healthy families.
%K Child, Community Networks, Cooperative Behavior, Humans, Needs Assessment, Pediatrics, Primary Health Care, Social Determinants of Health, United States
%P e993
%L 1001
%Y 10.1542/peds.2015-0549
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2015......136....0H

@Article{Henize2015,
author="Henize, Adrienne W.
and Beck, Andrew F.
and Klein, Melissa D.
and Adams, Monica
and Kahn, Robert S.",
title="A Road Map to Address the Social Determinants of Health Through Community Collaboration.",
journal="Pediatrics",
year="2015",
month="Oct",
day="21",
volume="136",
number="4",
pages="e993--1001",
keywords="Child",
keywords="Community Networks",
keywords="Cooperative Behavior",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Needs Assessment",
keywords="Pediatrics",
keywords="Primary Health Care",
keywords="Social Determinants of Health",
keywords="United States",
abstract="Economic, environmental, and psychosocial needs are common and wide-ranging among families cared for in primary care settings. Still, pediatric care delivery models are not set up to systematically address these fundamental risks to health. We offer a roadmap to help structure primary care approaches to these needs through the development of comprehensive and effective collaborations between the primary care setting and community partners. We use Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs as a well-recognized conceptual model to organize, prioritize, and determine appropriate interventions that can be adapted to both small and large practices. Specifically, collaborations with community organizations expert in addressing issues commonly encountered in primary care centers can be designed and executed in a phased manner: (1) build the case for action through a family-centered risk assessment, (2) organize and prioritize risks and interventions, (3) develop and sustain interventions, and (4) operationalize interventions in the clinical setting. This phased approach to collaboration also includes shared vision, codeveloped plans for implementation and evaluation, resource alignment, joint reflection and adaptation, and shared decisions regarding next steps. Training, electronic health record integration, refinement by using quality improvement methods, and innovative use of clinical space are important components that may be useful in a variety of clinical settings. Successful examples highlight how clinical-community partnerships can help to systematically address a hierarchy of needs for children and families. Pediatricians and community partners can collaborate to improve the well-being of at-risk children by leveraging their respective strengths and shared vision for healthy families.",
issn="1098-4275",
doi="10.1542/peds.2015-0549",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26391941",
language="eng"
}


PT Journal
AU Henize, AW
   Beck, AF
   Klein, MD
   Adams, M
   Kahn, RS
TI A Road Map to Address the Social Determinants of Health Through Community Collaboration.
SO Pediatrics
PD Oct
PY 2015
BP e993
EP 1001
VL 136
IS 4
DI 10.1542/peds.2015-0549
LA eng
DE Child; Community Networks; Cooperative Behavior; Humans; Needs Assessment; Pediatrics; Primary Health Care; Social Determinants of Health; United States
AB Economic, environmental, and psychosocial needs are common and wide-ranging among families cared for in primary care settings. Still, pediatric care delivery models are not set up to systematically address these fundamental risks to health. We offer a roadmap to help structure primary care approaches to these needs through the development of comprehensive and effective collaborations between the primary care setting and community partners. We use Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs as a well-recognized conceptual model to organize, prioritize, and determine appropriate interventions that can be adapted to both small and large practices. Specifically, collaborations with community organizations expert in addressing issues commonly encountered in primary care centers can be designed and executed in a phased manner: (1) build the case for action through a family-centered risk assessment, (2) organize and prioritize risks and interventions, (3) develop and sustain interventions, and (4) operationalize interventions in the clinical setting. This phased approach to collaboration also includes shared vision, codeveloped plans for implementation and evaluation, resource alignment, joint reflection and adaptation, and shared decisions regarding next steps. Training, electronic health record integration, refinement by using quality improvement methods, and innovative use of clinical space are important components that may be useful in a variety of clinical settings. Successful examples highlight how clinical-community partnerships can help to systematically address a hierarchy of needs for children and families. Pediatricians and community partners can collaborate to improve the well-being of at-risk children by leveraging their respective strengths and shared vision for healthy families.
ER

PMID- 26391941
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20151002
DCOM- 20160113
IS  - 1098-4275 (Electronic)
IS  - 0031-4005 (Linking)
VI  - 136
IP  - 4
DP  - 2015 Oct
TI  - A Road Map to Address the Social Determinants of Health Through Community
      Collaboration.
PG  - e993-1001
LID - 10.1542/peds.2015-0549 [doi]
AB  - Economic, environmental, and psychosocial needs are common and wide-ranging among
      families cared for in primary care settings. Still, pediatric care delivery
      models are not set up to systematically address these fundamental risks to
      health. We offer a roadmap to help structure primary care approaches to these
      needs through the development of comprehensive and effective collaborations
      between the primary care setting and community partners. We use Maslow's
      Hierarchy of Needs as a well-recognized conceptual model to organize, prioritize,
      and determine appropriate interventions that can be adapted to both small and
      large practices. Specifically, collaborations with community organizations expert
      in addressing issues commonly encountered in primary care centers can be designed
      and executed in a phased manner: (1) build the case for action through a
      family-centered risk assessment, (2) organize and prioritize risks and
      interventions, (3) develop and sustain interventions, and (4) operationalize
      interventions in the clinical setting. This phased approach to collaboration also
      includes shared vision, codeveloped plans for implementation and evaluation,
      resource alignment, joint reflection and adaptation, and shared decisions
      regarding next steps. Training, electronic health record integration, refinement 
      by using quality improvement methods, and innovative use of clinical space are
      important components that may be useful in a variety of clinical settings.
      Successful examples highlight how clinical-community partnerships can help to
      systematically address a hierarchy of needs for children and families.
      Pediatricians and community partners can collaborate to improve the well-being of
      at-risk children by leveraging their respective strengths and shared vision for
      healthy families.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
FAU - Henize, Adrienne W
AU  - Henize AW
AD  - Divisions of General and Community Pediatrics, and [email protected]
FAU - Beck, Andrew F
AU  - Beck AF
AD  - Divisions of General and Community Pediatrics, and Hospital Medicine, Department 
      of Pediatrics, and.
FAU - Klein, Melissa D
AU  - Klein MD
AD  - Divisions of General and Community Pediatrics, and Hospital Medicine, Department 
      of Pediatrics, and.
FAU - Adams, Monica
AU  - Adams M
AD  - Social Services, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
FAU - Kahn, Robert S
AU  - Kahn RS
AD  - Divisions of General and Community Pediatrics, and.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20150921
PL  - United States
TA  - Pediatrics
JT  - Pediatrics
JID - 0376422
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Child
MH  - Community Networks/*organization & administration
MH  - Cooperative Behavior
MH  - Humans
MH  - *Needs Assessment
MH  - Pediatrics/*organization & administration
MH  - Primary Health Care/*organization & administration
MH  - *Social Determinants of Health
MH  - United States
EDAT- 2015/09/24 06:00
MHDA- 2016/01/14 06:00
CRDT- 2015/09/23 06:00
PHST- 2015/06/30 [accepted]
PHST- 2015/09/21 [aheadofprint]
AID - peds.2015-0549 [pii]
AID - 10.1542/peds.2015-0549 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Pediatrics. 2015 Oct;136(4):e993-1001. doi: 10.1542/peds.2015-0549. Epub 2015 Sep
      21.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Henize, Adrienne W.
AU  - Beck, Andrew F.
AU  - Klein, Melissa D.
AU  - Adams, Monica
AU  - Kahn, Robert S.
PY  - 2015/Oct/21
TI  - A Road Map to Address the Social Determinants of Health Through Community Collaboration.
JO  - Pediatrics
SP  - e993
EP  - 1001
VL  - 136
IS  - 4
KW  - Child
KW  - Community Networks
KW  - Cooperative Behavior
KW  - Humans
KW  - Needs Assessment
KW  - Pediatrics
KW  - Primary Health Care
KW  - Social Determinants of Health
KW  - United States
N2  - Economic, environmental, and psychosocial needs are common and wide-ranging among families cared for in primary care settings. Still, pediatric care delivery models are not set up to systematically address these fundamental risks to health. We offer a roadmap to help structure primary care approaches to these needs through the development of comprehensive and effective collaborations between the primary care setting and community partners. We use Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs as a well-recognized conceptual model to organize, prioritize, and determine appropriate interventions that can be adapted to both small and large practices. Specifically, collaborations with community organizations expert in addressing issues commonly encountered in primary care centers can be designed and executed in a phased manner: (1) build the case for action through a family-centered risk assessment, (2) organize and prioritize risks and interventions, (3) develop and sustain interventions, and (4) operationalize interventions in the clinical setting. This phased approach to collaboration also includes shared vision, codeveloped plans for implementation and evaluation, resource alignment, joint reflection and adaptation, and shared decisions regarding next steps. Training, electronic health record integration, refinement by using quality improvement methods, and innovative use of clinical space are important components that may be useful in a variety of clinical settings. Successful examples highlight how clinical-community partnerships can help to systematically address a hierarchy of needs for children and families. Pediatricians and community partners can collaborate to improve the well-being of at-risk children by leveraging their respective strengths and shared vision for healthy families.
SN  - 1098-4275
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2015-0549
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26391941
ID  - Henize2015
ER  - 
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<b:Sources SelectedStyle="" xmlns:b="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography"  xmlns="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography" >
<b:Source>
<b:Tag>Henize2015</b:Tag>
<b:SourceType>ArticleInAPeriodical</b:SourceType>
<b:Year>2015</b:Year>
<b:Month>Oct</b:Month>
<b:Day>21</b:Day>
<b:PeriodicalName>Pediatrics</b:PeriodicalName>
<b:Volume>136</b:Volume>
<b:Issue>4</b:Issue>
<b:Pages>e993-1001</b:Pages>
<b:Author>
<b:Author><b:NameList>
<b:Person><b:Last>Henize</b:Last><b:First>Adrienne</b:First><b:Middle>W</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Beck</b:Last><b:First>Andrew</b:First><b:Middle>F</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Klein</b:Last><b:First>Melissa</b:First><b:Middle>D</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Adams</b:Last><b:First>Monica</b:First></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Kahn</b:Last><b:First>Robert</b:First><b:Middle>S</b:Middle></b:Person>
</b:NameList></b:Author>
</b:Author>
<b:Title>A Road Map to Address the Social Determinants of Health Through Community Collaboration.</b:Title>
<b:Comments>Economic, environmental, and psychosocial needs are common and wide-ranging among families cared for in primary care settings. Still, pediatric care delivery models are not set up to systematically address these fundamental risks to health. We offer a roadmap to help structure primary care approaches to these needs through the development of comprehensive and effective collaborations between the primary care setting and community partners. We use Maslow&apos;s Hierarchy of Needs as a well-recognized conceptual model to organize, prioritize, and determine appropriate interventions that can be adapted to both small and large practices. Specifically, collaborations with community organizations expert in addressing issues commonly encountered in primary care centers can be designed and executed in a phased manner: (1) build the case for action through a family-centered risk assessment, (2) organize and prioritize risks and interventions, (3) develop and sustain interventions, and (4) operationalize interventions in the clinical setting. This phased approach to collaboration also includes shared vision, codeveloped plans for implementation and evaluation, resource alignment, joint reflection and adaptation, and shared decisions regarding next steps. Training, electronic health record integration, refinement by using quality improvement methods, and innovative use of clinical space are important components that may be useful in a variety of clinical settings. Successful examples highlight how clinical-community partnerships can help to systematically address a hierarchy of needs for children and families. Pediatricians and community partners can collaborate to improve the well-being of at-risk children by leveraging their respective strengths and shared vision for healthy families.</b:Comments>
</b:Source>
</b:Sources>