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Where Do Agricultural Producers Get Safety and Health Information?

Abstract There is little empirical guidance regarding communication sources and channels used and trusted by agricultural producers. The goal of this study was to characterize frequency of use and levels of trust in agricultural safety and health information sources and channels accessed by agricultural producers. A sample of 195 agricultural producers was surveyed at county fairs in Iowa. Information was collected about the frequency of use and level of trust in 14 information sources and channels. Associations between age, gender, and education level and use and trust of each information source or channel were estimated using logistic regression. The sample consisted of 72% men with a mean age of 50.1 (SD = 15.6) years. Newspaper and magazine articles were the most commonly used agricultural safety and health information source or channel; 77% (n = 140) of respondents reporting using them at least monthly. Among those reporting monthly or more frequent use, 75% reported trusting mostly or completely, compared with 58% using and 49% trusting the Internet. High levels of use and trust of newspaper and magazine articles did not vary significantly by age, gender, or education level. Age in the highest tertile (57-83 years) was marginally associated with lower odds of using, as well as using and trusting, all the information sources and channels studied except for medical clinics (use only: odds ratio [OR], 3.51, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-15.64; use and trust: OR, 5.90, 95% CI, 0.91-38.42). These findings suggest that traditional media may be more effective than digital media for delivering agricultural safety and health information to agricultural producers. Medical clinics may be an untapped venue for communicating with older agricultural producers.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Agriculture

communication

health

safety

Journal Title journal of agromedicine
Publication Year Start
%A Chiu, Sophia; Cheyney, Marsha; Ramirez, Marizen; Gerr, Fred
%T Where Do Agricultural Producers Get Safety and Health Information?
%J Journal of agromedicine, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 265-272
%D 00/2015
%V 20
%N 3
%M eng
%B There is little empirical guidance regarding communication sources and channels used and trusted by agricultural producers. The goal of this study was to characterize frequency of use and levels of trust in agricultural safety and health information sources and channels accessed by agricultural producers. A sample of 195 agricultural producers was surveyed at county fairs in Iowa. Information was collected about the frequency of use and level of trust in 14 information sources and channels. Associations between age, gender, and education level and use and trust of each information source or channel were estimated using logistic regression. The sample consisted of 72% men with a mean age of 50.1 (SD = 15.6) years. Newspaper and magazine articles were the most commonly used agricultural safety and health information source or channel; 77% (n = 140) of respondents reporting using them at least monthly. Among those reporting monthly or more frequent use, 75% reported trusting mostly or completely, compared with 58% using and 49% trusting the Internet. High levels of use and trust of newspaper and magazine articles did not vary significantly by age, gender, or education level. Age in the highest tertile (57-83 years) was marginally associated with lower odds of using, as well as using and trusting, all the information sources and channels studied except for medical clinics (use only: odds ratio [OR], 3.51, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-15.64; use and trust: OR, 5.90, 95% CI, 0.91-38.42). These findings suggest that traditional media may be more effective than digital media for delivering agricultural safety and health information to agricultural producers. Medical clinics may be an untapped venue for communicating with older agricultural producers.
%P 265
%L 272
%Y 10.1080/1059924X.2015.1045156
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2015.......20..265C

@Article{Chiu2015,
author="Chiu, Sophia
and Cheyney, Marsha
and Ramirez, Marizen
and Gerr, Fred",
title="Where Do Agricultural Producers Get Safety and Health Information?",
journal="Journal of agromedicine",
year="2015",
volume="20",
number="3",
pages="265--272",
abstract="There is little empirical guidance regarding communication sources and channels used and trusted by agricultural producers. The goal of this study was to characterize frequency of use and levels of trust in agricultural safety and health information sources and channels accessed by agricultural producers. A sample of 195 agricultural producers was surveyed at county fairs in Iowa. Information was collected about the frequency of use and level of trust in 14 information sources and channels. Associations between age, gender, and education level and use and trust of each information source or channel were estimated using logistic regression. The sample consisted of 72\% men with a mean age of 50.1 (SD = 15.6) years. Newspaper and magazine articles were the most commonly used agricultural safety and health information source or channel; 77\% (n = 140) of respondents reporting using them at least monthly. Among those reporting monthly or more frequent use, 75\% reported trusting mostly or completely, compared with 58\% using and 49\% trusting the Internet. High levels of use and trust of newspaper and magazine articles did not vary significantly by age, gender, or education level. Age in the highest tertile (57-83 years) was marginally associated with lower odds of using, as well as using and trusting, all the information sources and channels studied except for medical clinics (use only: odds ratio [OR], 3.51, 95\% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-15.64; use and trust: OR, 5.90, 95\% CI, 0.91-38.42). These findings suggest that traditional media may be more effective than digital media for delivering agricultural safety and health information to agricultural producers. Medical clinics may be an untapped venue for communicating with older agricultural producers.",
issn="1545-0813",
doi="10.1080/1059924X.2015.1045156",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26237716",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Where Do Agricultural Producers Get Safety and Health Information?
%A Chiu, Sophia
%A Cheyney, Marsha
%A Ramirez, Marizen
%A Gerr, Fred
%J Journal of agromedicine
%D 2015
%V 20
%N 3
%@ 1545-0813
%G eng
%F Chiu2015
%X There is little empirical guidance regarding communication sources and channels used and trusted by agricultural producers. The goal of this study was to characterize frequency of use and levels of trust in agricultural safety and health information sources and channels accessed by agricultural producers. A sample of 195 agricultural producers was surveyed at county fairs in Iowa. Information was collected about the frequency of use and level of trust in 14 information sources and channels. Associations between age, gender, and education level and use and trust of each information source or channel were estimated using logistic regression. The sample consisted of 72% men with a mean age of 50.1 (SD = 15.6) years. Newspaper and magazine articles were the most commonly used agricultural safety and health information source or channel; 77% (n = 140) of respondents reporting using them at least monthly. Among those reporting monthly or more frequent use, 75% reported trusting mostly or completely, compared with 58% using and 49% trusting the Internet. High levels of use and trust of newspaper and magazine articles did not vary significantly by age, gender, or education level. Age in the highest tertile (57-83 years) was marginally associated with lower odds of using, as well as using and trusting, all the information sources and channels studied except for medical clinics (use only: odds ratio [OR], 3.51, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-15.64; use and trust: OR, 5.90, 95% CI, 0.91-38.42). These findings suggest that traditional media may be more effective than digital media for delivering agricultural safety and health information to agricultural producers. Medical clinics may be an untapped venue for communicating with older agricultural producers.
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1059924X.2015.1045156
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26237716
%P 265-272

PT Journal
AU Chiu, S
   Cheyney, M
   Ramirez, M
   Gerr, F
TI Where Do Agricultural Producers Get Safety and Health Information?
SO Journal of agromedicine
JI J Agromedicine
PY 2015
BP 265
EP 272
VL 20
IS 3
DI 10.1080/1059924X.2015.1045156
LA eng
AB There is little empirical guidance regarding communication sources and channels used and trusted by agricultural producers. The goal of this study was to characterize frequency of use and levels of trust in agricultural safety and health information sources and channels accessed by agricultural producers. A sample of 195 agricultural producers was surveyed at county fairs in Iowa. Information was collected about the frequency of use and level of trust in 14 information sources and channels. Associations between age, gender, and education level and use and trust of each information source or channel were estimated using logistic regression. The sample consisted of 72% men with a mean age of 50.1 (SD = 15.6) years. Newspaper and magazine articles were the most commonly used agricultural safety and health information source or channel; 77% (n = 140) of respondents reporting using them at least monthly. Among those reporting monthly or more frequent use, 75% reported trusting mostly or completely, compared with 58% using and 49% trusting the Internet. High levels of use and trust of newspaper and magazine articles did not vary significantly by age, gender, or education level. Age in the highest tertile (57-83 years) was marginally associated with lower odds of using, as well as using and trusting, all the information sources and channels studied except for medical clinics (use only: odds ratio [OR], 3.51, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-15.64; use and trust: OR, 5.90, 95% CI, 0.91-38.42). These findings suggest that traditional media may be more effective than digital media for delivering agricultural safety and health information to agricultural producers. Medical clinics may be an untapped venue for communicating with older agricultural producers.
ER

PMID- 26237716
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20150804
IS  - 1545-0813 (Electronic)
IS  - 1059-924X (Linking)
VI  - 20
IP  - 3
DP  - 2015
TI  - Where Do Agricultural Producers Get Safety and Health Information?
PG  - 265-72
LID - 10.1080/1059924X.2015.1045156 [doi]
AB  - There is little empirical guidance regarding communication sources and channels
      used and trusted by agricultural producers. The goal of this study was to
      characterize frequency of use and levels of trust in agricultural safety and
      health information sources and channels accessed by agricultural producers. A
      sample of 195 agricultural producers was surveyed at county fairs in Iowa.
      Information was collected about the frequency of use and level of trust in 14
      information sources and channels. Associations between age, gender, and education
      level and use and trust of each information source or channel were estimated
      using logistic regression. The sample consisted of 72% men with a mean age of
      50.1 (SD = 15.6) years. Newspaper and magazine articles were the most commonly
      used agricultural safety and health information source or channel; 77% (n = 140) 
      of respondents reporting using them at least monthly. Among those reporting
      monthly or more frequent use, 75% reported trusting mostly or completely,
      compared with 58% using and 49% trusting the Internet. High levels of use and
      trust of newspaper and magazine articles did not vary significantly by age,
      gender, or education level. Age in the highest tertile (57-83 years) was
      marginally associated with lower odds of using, as well as using and trusting,
      all the information sources and channels studied except for medical clinics (use 
      only: odds ratio [OR], 3.51, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-15.64; use and
      trust: OR, 5.90, 95% CI, 0.91-38.42). These findings suggest that traditional
      media may be more effective than digital media for delivering agricultural safety
      and health information to agricultural producers. Medical clinics may be an
      untapped venue for communicating with older agricultural producers.
FAU - Chiu, Sophia
AU  - Chiu S
AD  - a Great Plains Center for Agricultural Health, Department of Occupational and
      Environmental Health , College of Public Health, University of Iowa , Iowa City ,
      Iowa , USA.
FAU - Cheyney, Marsha
AU  - Cheyney M
FAU - Ramirez, Marizen
AU  - Ramirez M
FAU - Gerr, Fred
AU  - Gerr F
LA  - eng
GR  - U54-OH007548)/OH/NIOSH CDC HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL  - England
TA  - J Agromedicine
JT  - Journal of agromedicine
JID - 9421530
SB  - IM
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Agriculture
OT  - communication
OT  - health
OT  - safety
EDAT- 2015/08/04 06:00
MHDA- 2015/08/04 06:00
CRDT- 2015/08/04 06:00
AID - 10.1080/1059924X.2015.1045156 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Agromedicine. 2015;20(3):265-72. doi: 10.1080/1059924X.2015.1045156.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Chiu, Sophia
AU  - Cheyney, Marsha
AU  - Ramirez, Marizen
AU  - Gerr, Fred
PY  - 2015//
TI  - Where Do Agricultural Producers Get Safety and Health Information?
T2  - J Agromedicine
JO  - Journal of agromedicine
SP  - 265
EP  - 272
VL  - 20
IS  - 3
N2  - There is little empirical guidance regarding communication sources and channels used and trusted by agricultural producers. The goal of this study was to characterize frequency of use and levels of trust in agricultural safety and health information sources and channels accessed by agricultural producers. A sample of 195 agricultural producers was surveyed at county fairs in Iowa. Information was collected about the frequency of use and level of trust in 14 information sources and channels. Associations between age, gender, and education level and use and trust of each information source or channel were estimated using logistic regression. The sample consisted of 72% men with a mean age of 50.1 (SD = 15.6) years. Newspaper and magazine articles were the most commonly used agricultural safety and health information source or channel; 77% (n = 140) of respondents reporting using them at least monthly. Among those reporting monthly or more frequent use, 75% reported trusting mostly or completely, compared with 58% using and 49% trusting the Internet. High levels of use and trust of newspaper and magazine articles did not vary significantly by age, gender, or education level. Age in the highest tertile (57-83 years) was marginally associated with lower odds of using, as well as using and trusting, all the information sources and channels studied except for medical clinics (use only: odds ratio [OR], 3.51, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-15.64; use and trust: OR, 5.90, 95% CI, 0.91-38.42). These findings suggest that traditional media may be more effective than digital media for delivering agricultural safety and health information to agricultural producers. Medical clinics may be an untapped venue for communicating with older agricultural producers.
SN  - 1545-0813
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1059924X.2015.1045156
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26237716
ID  - Chiu2015
ER  - 
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