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Antibody responses among adolescent females receiving the quadrivalent HPV vaccine series corresponding to standard or non-standard dosing intervals.

Abstract Quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) is recommended as a 3-dose series administered at 0, 1-2, and 6 months. However, this dosing schedule is often not followed leading to longer dosing intervals. We conducted a prospective study to assess antibody titers to HPV4 when dose 2 and/or dose 3 were administered on schedule or delayed. Healthy females (N=331) aged 9-18 years were enrolled at the time of receipt of HPV4 dose 2 or 3. Participants were classified as belonging to one of four groups depending upon timing of receipt of HPV4: both doses on time; only dose 2 delayed later than 90 days; only dose 3 delayed later than 180 days; or both doses 2 and 3 delayed. Pre- and post-dose 3 blood samples were assayed for HPV antibody titers (types 6, 11, 16, and 18). Post-dose 3 geometric mean titers (GMTs) for all HPV types were not significantly lower for any of the delayed dosing groups when compared to the on time group. When compared to the on time group, the post dose 3 GMTs in the delayed dose 3 group were significantly higher (p<0.05) for HPV types 6, 11, and 16. Our findings suggest that delays of dose 2 or 3 do not interfere with immune responses after completion of the 3-dose series. These results support current recommendations to not administer additional doses of HPV4 vaccine if dose 2, dose 3, or both doses have been administered late.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Dosing

Human papillomavirus

Immunity

NCT02280642

Vaccine

Journal Title vaccine
Publication Year Start
%A Russell, Kate; Dunne, Eileen F.; Kemper, Alex R.; Dolor, Rowena J.; Unger, Elizabeth R.; Panicker, Gitika; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Walter, Emmanuel B.
%T Antibody responses among adolescent females receiving the quadrivalent HPV vaccine series corresponding to standard or non-standard dosing intervals.
%J Vaccine, vol. 33, no. 16, pp. 1953-1958
%D 04/2015
%V 33
%N 16
%M eng
%B Quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) is recommended as a 3-dose series administered at 0, 1-2, and 6 months. However, this dosing schedule is often not followed leading to longer dosing intervals. We conducted a prospective study to assess antibody titers to HPV4 when dose 2 and/or dose 3 were administered on schedule or delayed. Healthy females (N=331) aged 9-18 years were enrolled at the time of receipt of HPV4 dose 2 or 3. Participants were classified as belonging to one of four groups depending upon timing of receipt of HPV4: both doses on time; only dose 2 delayed later than 90 days; only dose 3 delayed later than 180 days; or both doses 2 and 3 delayed. Pre- and post-dose 3 blood samples were assayed for HPV antibody titers (types 6, 11, 16, and 18). Post-dose 3 geometric mean titers (GMTs) for all HPV types were not significantly lower for any of the delayed dosing groups when compared to the on time group. When compared to the on time group, the post dose 3 GMTs in the delayed dose 3 group were significantly higher (p<0.05) for HPV types 6, 11, and 16. Our findings suggest that delays of dose 2 or 3 do not interfere with immune responses after completion of the 3-dose series. These results support current recommendations to not administer additional doses of HPV4 vaccine if dose 2, dose 3, or both doses have been administered late.
%K Adolescent, Alphapapillomavirus, Antibodies, Viral, Child, Female, Humans, Papillomavirus Infections, Papillomavirus Vaccines, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors
%P 1953
%L 1958
%Y 10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.02.058
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2015.......33.1953R

@Article{Russell2015,
author="Russell, Kate
and Dunne, Eileen F.
and Kemper, Alex R.
and Dolor, Rowena J.
and Unger, Elizabeth R.
and Panicker, Gitika
and Markowitz, Lauri E.
and Walter, Emmanuel B.",
title="Antibody responses among adolescent females receiving the quadrivalent HPV vaccine series corresponding to standard or non-standard dosing intervals.",
journal="Vaccine",
year="2015",
month="Apr",
day="15",
volume="33",
number="16",
pages="1953--1958",
keywords="Adolescent",
keywords="Alphapapillomavirus",
keywords="Antibodies, Viral",
keywords="Child",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Papillomavirus Infections",
keywords="Papillomavirus Vaccines",
keywords="Prospective Studies",
keywords="Risk Factors",
abstract="Quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) is recommended as a 3-dose series administered at 0, 1-2, and 6 months. However, this dosing schedule is often not followed leading to longer dosing intervals. We conducted a prospective study to assess antibody titers to HPV4 when dose 2 and/or dose 3 were administered on schedule or delayed. Healthy females (N=331) aged 9-18 years were enrolled at the time of receipt of HPV4 dose 2 or 3. Participants were classified as belonging to one of four groups depending upon timing of receipt of HPV4: both doses on time; only dose 2 delayed later than 90 days; only dose 3 delayed later than 180 days; or both doses 2 and 3 delayed. Pre- and post-dose 3 blood samples were assayed for HPV antibody titers (types 6, 11, 16, and 18). Post-dose 3 geometric mean titers (GMTs) for all HPV types were not significantly lower for any of the delayed dosing groups when compared to the on time group. When compared to the on time group, the post dose 3 GMTs in the delayed dose 3 group were significantly higher (p<0.05) for HPV types 6, 11, and 16. Our findings suggest that delays of dose 2 or 3 do not interfere with immune responses after completion of the 3-dose series. These results support current recommendations to not administer additional doses of HPV4 vaccine if dose 2, dose 3, or both doses have been administered late.",
issn="1873-2518",
doi="10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.02.058",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25744229",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Antibody responses among adolescent females receiving the quadrivalent HPV vaccine series corresponding to standard or non-standard dosing intervals.
%A Russell, Kate
%A Dunne, Eileen F.
%A Kemper, Alex R.
%A Dolor, Rowena J.
%A Unger, Elizabeth R.
%A Panicker, Gitika
%A Markowitz, Lauri E.
%A Walter, Emmanuel B.
%J Vaccine
%D 2015
%8 Apr 15
%V 33
%N 16
%@ 1873-2518
%G eng
%F Russell2015
%X Quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) is recommended as a 3-dose series administered at 0, 1-2, and 6 months. However, this dosing schedule is often not followed leading to longer dosing intervals. We conducted a prospective study to assess antibody titers to HPV4 when dose 2 and/or dose 3 were administered on schedule or delayed. Healthy females (N=331) aged 9-18 years were enrolled at the time of receipt of HPV4 dose 2 or 3. Participants were classified as belonging to one of four groups depending upon timing of receipt of HPV4: both doses on time; only dose 2 delayed later than 90 days; only dose 3 delayed later than 180 days; or both doses 2 and 3 delayed. Pre- and post-dose 3 blood samples were assayed for HPV antibody titers (types 6, 11, 16, and 18). Post-dose 3 geometric mean titers (GMTs) for all HPV types were not significantly lower for any of the delayed dosing groups when compared to the on time group. When compared to the on time group, the post dose 3 GMTs in the delayed dose 3 group were significantly higher (p<0.05) for HPV types 6, 11, and 16. Our findings suggest that delays of dose 2 or 3 do not interfere with immune responses after completion of the 3-dose series. These results support current recommendations to not administer additional doses of HPV4 vaccine if dose 2, dose 3, or both doses have been administered late.
%K Adolescent
%K Alphapapillomavirus
%K Antibodies, Viral
%K Child
%K Female
%K Humans
%K Papillomavirus Infections
%K Papillomavirus Vaccines
%K Prospective Studies
%K Risk Factors
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.02.058
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25744229
%P 1953-1958

PT Journal
AU Russell, K
   Dunne, EF
   Kemper, AR
   Dolor, RJ
   Unger, ER
   Panicker, G
   Markowitz, LE
   Walter, EB
TI Antibody responses among adolescent females receiving the quadrivalent HPV vaccine series corresponding to standard or non-standard dosing intervals.
SO Vaccine
PD Apr
PY 2015
BP 1953
EP 1958
VL 33
IS 16
DI 10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.02.058
LA eng
DE Adolescent; Alphapapillomavirus; Antibodies, Viral; Child; Female; Humans; Papillomavirus Infections; Papillomavirus Vaccines; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors
AB Quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) is recommended as a 3-dose series administered at 0, 1-2, and 6 months. However, this dosing schedule is often not followed leading to longer dosing intervals. We conducted a prospective study to assess antibody titers to HPV4 when dose 2 and/or dose 3 were administered on schedule or delayed. Healthy females (N=331) aged 9-18 years were enrolled at the time of receipt of HPV4 dose 2 or 3. Participants were classified as belonging to one of four groups depending upon timing of receipt of HPV4: both doses on time; only dose 2 delayed later than 90 days; only dose 3 delayed later than 180 days; or both doses 2 and 3 delayed. Pre- and post-dose 3 blood samples were assayed for HPV antibody titers (types 6, 11, 16, and 18). Post-dose 3 geometric mean titers (GMTs) for all HPV types were not significantly lower for any of the delayed dosing groups when compared to the on time group. When compared to the on time group, the post dose 3 GMTs in the delayed dose 3 group were significantly higher (p<0.05) for HPV types 6, 11, and 16. Our findings suggest that delays of dose 2 or 3 do not interfere with immune responses after completion of the 3-dose series. These results support current recommendations to not administer additional doses of HPV4 vaccine if dose 2, dose 3, or both doses have been administered late.
ER

PMID- 25744229
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20150330
DCOM- 20150723
IS  - 1873-2518 (Electronic)
IS  - 0264-410X (Linking)
VI  - 33
IP  - 16
DP  - 2015 Apr 15
TI  - Antibody responses among adolescent females receiving the quadrivalent HPV
      vaccine series corresponding to standard or non-standard dosing intervals.
PG  - 1953-8
LID - 10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.02.058 [doi]
LID - S0264-410X(15)00247-9 [pii]
AB  - Quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) is recommended as a 3-dose
      series administered at 0, 1-2, and 6 months. However, this dosing schedule is
      often not followed leading to longer dosing intervals. We conducted a prospective
      study to assess antibody titers to HPV4 when dose 2 and/or dose 3 were
      administered on schedule or delayed. Healthy females (N=331) aged 9-18 years were
      enrolled at the time of receipt of HPV4 dose 2 or 3. Participants were classified
      as belonging to one of four groups depending upon timing of receipt of HPV4: both
      doses on time; only dose 2 delayed later than 90 days; only dose 3 delayed later 
      than 180 days; or both doses 2 and 3 delayed. Pre- and post-dose 3 blood samples 
      were assayed for HPV antibody titers (types 6, 11, 16, and 18). Post-dose 3
      geometric mean titers (GMTs) for all HPV types were not significantly lower for
      any of the delayed dosing groups when compared to the on time group. When
      compared to the on time group, the post dose 3 GMTs in the delayed dose 3 group
      were significantly higher (p&lt;0.05) for HPV types 6, 11, and 16. Our findings
      suggest that delays of dose 2 or 3 do not interfere with immune responses after
      completion of the 3-dose series. These results support current recommendations to
      not administer additional doses of HPV4 vaccine if dose 2, dose 3, or both doses 
      have been administered late.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
FAU - Russell, Kate
AU  - Russell K
AD  - Clinical Vaccine Unit and Primary Care Research Consortium, Duke University
      School of Medicine, 2608 Erwin Road Suite 210, Durham, NC 27705, USA. Electronic 
      address: [email protected]
FAU - Dunne, Eileen F
AU  - Dunne EF
AD  - Division of STD Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600
      Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
FAU - Kemper, Alex R
AU  - Kemper AR
AD  - Clinical Vaccine Unit and Primary Care Research Consortium, Duke University
      School of Medicine, 2608 Erwin Road Suite 210, Durham, NC 27705, USA. Electronic 
      address: [email protected]
FAU - Dolor, Rowena J
AU  - Dolor RJ
AD  - Clinical Vaccine Unit and Primary Care Research Consortium, Duke University
      School of Medicine, 2608 Erwin Road Suite 210, Durham, NC 27705, USA. Electronic 
      address: [email protected]
FAU - Unger, Elizabeth R
AU  - Unger ER
AD  - Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, Centers for Disease Control
      and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA. Electronic
      address: [email protected]
FAU - Panicker, Gitika
AU  - Panicker G
AD  - Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, Centers for Disease Control
      and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA. Electronic
      address: [email protected]
FAU - Markowitz, Lauri E
AU  - Markowitz LE
AD  - Division of STD Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600
      Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
FAU - Walter, Emmanuel B
AU  - Walter EB
AD  - Clinical Vaccine Unit and Primary Care Research Consortium, Duke University
      School of Medicine, 2608 Erwin Road Suite 210, Durham, NC 27705, USA. Electronic 
      address: [email protected]
LA  - eng
GR  - 5U36CD319276/CD/ODCDC CDC HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT  - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
DEP - 20150303
PL  - Netherlands
TA  - Vaccine
JT  - Vaccine
JID - 8406899
RN  - 0 (Antibodies, Viral)
RN  - 0 (Papillomavirus Vaccines)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Alphapapillomavirus/classification/*immunology
MH  - Antibodies, Viral/blood/*immunology
MH  - Child
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Papillomavirus Infections/*prevention &amp; control
MH  - Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration &amp; dosage/*immunology
MH  - Prospective Studies
MH  - Risk Factors
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Dosing
OT  - Human papillomavirus
OT  - Immunity
OT  - NCT02280642
OT  - Vaccine
EDAT- 2015/03/07 06:00
MHDA- 2015/07/24 06:00
CRDT- 2015/03/07 06:00
PHST- 2014/12/03 [received]
PHST- 2015/01/29 [revised]
PHST- 2015/02/20 [accepted]
PHST- 2015/03/03 [aheadofprint]
AID - S0264-410X(15)00247-9 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.02.058 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Vaccine. 2015 Apr 15;33(16):1953-8. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.02.058. Epub 2015
      Mar 3.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Russell, Kate
AU  - Dunne, Eileen F.
AU  - Kemper, Alex R.
AU  - Dolor, Rowena J.
AU  - Unger, Elizabeth R.
AU  - Panicker, Gitika
AU  - Markowitz, Lauri E.
AU  - Walter, Emmanuel B.
PY  - 2015/Apr/15
TI  - Antibody responses among adolescent females receiving the quadrivalent HPV vaccine series corresponding to standard or non-standard dosing intervals.
JO  - Vaccine
SP  - 1953
EP  - 1958
VL  - 33
IS  - 16
KW  - Adolescent
KW  - Alphapapillomavirus
KW  - Antibodies, Viral
KW  - Child
KW  - Female
KW  - Humans
KW  - Papillomavirus Infections
KW  - Papillomavirus Vaccines
KW  - Prospective Studies
KW  - Risk Factors
N2  - Quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) is recommended as a 3-dose series administered at 0, 1-2, and 6 months. However, this dosing schedule is often not followed leading to longer dosing intervals. We conducted a prospective study to assess antibody titers to HPV4 when dose 2 and/or dose 3 were administered on schedule or delayed. Healthy females (N=331) aged 9-18 years were enrolled at the time of receipt of HPV4 dose 2 or 3. Participants were classified as belonging to one of four groups depending upon timing of receipt of HPV4: both doses on time; only dose 2 delayed later than 90 days; only dose 3 delayed later than 180 days; or both doses 2 and 3 delayed. Pre- and post-dose 3 blood samples were assayed for HPV antibody titers (types 6, 11, 16, and 18). Post-dose 3 geometric mean titers (GMTs) for all HPV types were not significantly lower for any of the delayed dosing groups when compared to the on time group. When compared to the on time group, the post dose 3 GMTs in the delayed dose 3 group were significantly higher (p<0.05) for HPV types 6, 11, and 16. Our findings suggest that delays of dose 2 or 3 do not interfere with immune responses after completion of the 3-dose series. These results support current recommendations to not administer additional doses of HPV4 vaccine if dose 2, dose 3, or both doses have been administered late.
SN  - 1873-2518
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.02.058
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25744229
ID  - Russell2015
ER  - 
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<b:Comments>Quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) is recommended as a 3-dose series administered at 0, 1-2, and 6 months. However, this dosing schedule is often not followed leading to longer dosing intervals. We conducted a prospective study to assess antibody titers to HPV4 when dose 2 and/or dose 3 were administered on schedule or delayed. Healthy females (N=331) aged 9-18 years were enrolled at the time of receipt of HPV4 dose 2 or 3. Participants were classified as belonging to one of four groups depending upon timing of receipt of HPV4: both doses on time; only dose 2 delayed later than 90 days; only dose 3 delayed later than 180 days; or both doses 2 and 3 delayed. Pre- and post-dose 3 blood samples were assayed for HPV antibody titers (types 6, 11, 16, and 18). Post-dose 3 geometric mean titers (GMTs) for all HPV types were not significantly lower for any of the delayed dosing groups when compared to the on time group. When compared to the on time group, the post dose 3 GMTs in the delayed dose 3 group were significantly higher (p&lt;0.05) for HPV types 6, 11, and 16. Our findings suggest that delays of dose 2 or 3 do not interfere with immune responses after completion of the 3-dose series. These results support current recommendations to not administer additional doses of HPV4 vaccine if dose 2, dose 3, or both doses have been administered late.</b:Comments>
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