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Support services for survivors of ebola virus disease - Sierra Leone, 2014.

Abstract As of December 6, 2014, Sierra Leone reported 6,317 laboratory-confirmed cases of Ebola virus disease (Ebola), the highest number of reported cases in the current West Africa epidemic. The Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation reported that as of December 6, 2014, there were 1,181 persons who had survived and were discharged. Survivors from previous Ebola outbreaks have reported major barriers to resuming normal lives after release from treatment, such as emotional distress, health issues, loss of possessions, and difficulty regaining their livelihoods. In August 2014, a knowledge, attitude, and practice survey regarding the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, administered by a consortium of partners that included the Ministry of Health and Sanitation, UNICEF, CDC, and a local nongovernmental organization, Focus 1000, found that 96% of the general population respondents reported some discriminatory attitude towards persons with suspected or known Ebola. Access to increased psychosocial support, provision of goods, and family and community reunification programs might reduce these barriers. Survivors also have unique potential to contribute to the Ebola response, particularly because survivors might have some immunity to the same virus strain. In previous outbreaks, survivors served as burial team members, contact tracers, and community educators promoting messages that seeking treatment improves the chances for survival and that persons who survived Ebola can help their communities. As caregivers in Ebola treatment units, survivors have encouraged patients to stay hydrated and eat and inspired them to believe that they, too, can survive. Survivors regaining livelihood through participation in the response might offset the stigma associated with Ebola.
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Social Support

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start
%A Lee-Kwan, Seung Hee; DeLuca, Nickolas; Adams, Monica; Dalling, Matthew; Drevlow, Elizabeth; Gassama, Gladys; Davies, Tina
%A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
%T Support services for survivors of ebola virus disease - Sierra Leone, 2014.
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, vol. 63, no. 50, pp. 1205-1206
%D 12/2014
%V 63
%N 50
%M eng
%B As of December 6, 2014, Sierra Leone reported 6,317 laboratory-confirmed cases of Ebola virus disease (Ebola), the highest number of reported cases in the current West Africa epidemic. The Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation reported that as of December 6, 2014, there were 1,181 persons who had survived and were discharged. Survivors from previous Ebola outbreaks have reported major barriers to resuming normal lives after release from treatment, such as emotional distress, health issues, loss of possessions, and difficulty regaining their livelihoods. In August 2014, a knowledge, attitude, and practice survey regarding the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, administered by a consortium of partners that included the Ministry of Health and Sanitation, UNICEF, CDC, and a local nongovernmental organization, Focus 1000, found that 96% of the general population respondents reported some discriminatory attitude towards persons with suspected or known Ebola. Access to increased psychosocial support, provision of goods, and family and community reunification programs might reduce these barriers. Survivors also have unique potential to contribute to the Ebola response, particularly because survivors might have some immunity to the same virus strain. In previous outbreaks, survivors served as burial team members, contact tracers, and community educators promoting messages that seeking treatment improves the chances for survival and that persons who survived Ebola can help their communities. As caregivers in Ebola treatment units, survivors have encouraged patients to stay hydrated and eat and inspired them to believe that they, too, can survive. Survivors regaining livelihood through participation in the response might offset the stigma associated with Ebola.
%K Epidemics, Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola, Humans, Sierra Leone, Social Support, Survivors
%P 1205
%L 1206
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2014.......63.1205L

@Article{Lee-Kwan2014,
author="Lee-Kwan, Seung Hee
and DeLuca, Nickolas
and Adams, Monica
and Dalling, Matthew
and Drevlow, Elizabeth
and Gassama, Gladys
and Davies, Tina
and {Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)}",
title="Support services for survivors of ebola virus disease - Sierra Leone, 2014.",
journal="MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report",
year="2014",
month="Dec",
day="19",
volume="63",
number="50",
pages="1205--1206",
keywords="Epidemics",
keywords="Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Sierra Leone",
keywords="Social Support",
keywords="Survivors",
abstract="As of December 6, 2014, Sierra Leone reported 6,317 laboratory-confirmed cases of Ebola virus disease (Ebola), the highest number of reported cases in the current West Africa epidemic. The Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation reported that as of December 6, 2014, there were 1,181 persons who had survived and were discharged. Survivors from previous Ebola outbreaks have reported major barriers to resuming normal lives after release from treatment, such as emotional distress, health issues, loss of possessions, and difficulty regaining their livelihoods. In August 2014, a knowledge, attitude, and practice survey regarding the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, administered by a consortium of partners that included the Ministry of Health and Sanitation, UNICEF, CDC, and a local nongovernmental organization, Focus 1000, found that 96\% of the general population respondents reported some discriminatory attitude towards persons with suspected or known Ebola. Access to increased psychosocial support, provision of goods, and family and community reunification programs might reduce these barriers. Survivors also have unique potential to contribute to the Ebola response, particularly because survivors might have some immunity to the same virus strain. In previous outbreaks, survivors served as burial team members, contact tracers, and community educators promoting messages that seeking treatment improves the chances for survival and that persons who survived Ebola can help their communities. As caregivers in Ebola treatment units, survivors have encouraged patients to stay hydrated and eat and inspired them to believe that they, too, can survive. Survivors regaining livelihood through participation in the response might offset the stigma associated with Ebola.",
issn="1545-861X",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25522090",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Support services for survivors of ebola virus disease - Sierra Leone, 2014.
%A Lee-Kwan, Seung Hee
%A DeLuca, Nickolas
%A Adams, Monica
%A Dalling, Matthew
%A Drevlow, Elizabeth
%A Gassama, Gladys
%A Davies, Tina
%A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
%J MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
%D 2014
%8 Dec 19
%V 63
%N 50
%@ 1545-861X
%G eng
%F Lee-Kwan2014
%X As of December 6, 2014, Sierra Leone reported 6,317 laboratory-confirmed cases of Ebola virus disease (Ebola), the highest number of reported cases in the current West Africa epidemic. The Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation reported that as of December 6, 2014, there were 1,181 persons who had survived and were discharged. Survivors from previous Ebola outbreaks have reported major barriers to resuming normal lives after release from treatment, such as emotional distress, health issues, loss of possessions, and difficulty regaining their livelihoods. In August 2014, a knowledge, attitude, and practice survey regarding the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, administered by a consortium of partners that included the Ministry of Health and Sanitation, UNICEF, CDC, and a local nongovernmental organization, Focus 1000, found that 96% of the general population respondents reported some discriminatory attitude towards persons with suspected or known Ebola. Access to increased psychosocial support, provision of goods, and family and community reunification programs might reduce these barriers. Survivors also have unique potential to contribute to the Ebola response, particularly because survivors might have some immunity to the same virus strain. In previous outbreaks, survivors served as burial team members, contact tracers, and community educators promoting messages that seeking treatment improves the chances for survival and that persons who survived Ebola can help their communities. As caregivers in Ebola treatment units, survivors have encouraged patients to stay hydrated and eat and inspired them to believe that they, too, can survive. Survivors regaining livelihood through participation in the response might offset the stigma associated with Ebola.
%K Epidemics
%K Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola
%K Humans
%K Sierra Leone
%K Social Support
%K Survivors
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25522090
%P 1205-1206

PT Journal
AU Lee-Kwan, SH
   DeLuca, N
   Adams, M
   Dalling, M
   Drevlow, E
   Gassama, G
   Davies, T
AU Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
TI Support services for survivors of ebola virus disease - Sierra Leone, 2014.
SO MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JI MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
PD Dec
PY 2014
BP 1205
EP 1206
VL 63
IS 50
LA eng
DE Epidemics; Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola; Humans; Sierra Leone; Social Support; Survivors
AB As of December 6, 2014, Sierra Leone reported 6,317 laboratory-confirmed cases of Ebola virus disease (Ebola), the highest number of reported cases in the current West Africa epidemic. The Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation reported that as of December 6, 2014, there were 1,181 persons who had survived and were discharged. Survivors from previous Ebola outbreaks have reported major barriers to resuming normal lives after release from treatment, such as emotional distress, health issues, loss of possessions, and difficulty regaining their livelihoods. In August 2014, a knowledge, attitude, and practice survey regarding the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, administered by a consortium of partners that included the Ministry of Health and Sanitation, UNICEF, CDC, and a local nongovernmental organization, Focus 1000, found that 96% of the general population respondents reported some discriminatory attitude towards persons with suspected or known Ebola. Access to increased psychosocial support, provision of goods, and family and community reunification programs might reduce these barriers. Survivors also have unique potential to contribute to the Ebola response, particularly because survivors might have some immunity to the same virus strain. In previous outbreaks, survivors served as burial team members, contact tracers, and community educators promoting messages that seeking treatment improves the chances for survival and that persons who survived Ebola can help their communities. As caregivers in Ebola treatment units, survivors have encouraged patients to stay hydrated and eat and inspired them to believe that they, too, can survive. Survivors regaining livelihood through participation in the response might offset the stigma associated with Ebola.
ER

PMID- 25522090
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20141219
DCOM- 20150213
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 63
IP  - 50
DP  - 2014 Dec 19
TI  - Support services for survivors of ebola virus disease - Sierra Leone, 2014.
PG  - 1205-6
AB  - As of December 6, 2014, Sierra Leone reported 6,317 laboratory-confirmed cases of
      Ebola virus disease (Ebola), the highest number of reported cases in the current 
      West Africa epidemic. The Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation reported
      that as of December 6, 2014, there were 1,181 persons who had survived and were
      discharged. Survivors from previous Ebola outbreaks have reported major barriers 
      to resuming normal lives after release from treatment, such as emotional
      distress, health issues, loss of possessions, and difficulty regaining their
      livelihoods. In August 2014, a knowledge, attitude, and practice survey regarding
      the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, administered by a consortium of partners that
      included the Ministry of Health and Sanitation, UNICEF, CDC, and a local
      nongovernmental organization, Focus 1000, found that 96% of the general
      population respondents reported some discriminatory attitude towards persons with
      suspected or known Ebola. Access to increased psychosocial support, provision of 
      goods, and family and community reunification programs might reduce these
      barriers. Survivors also have unique potential to contribute to the Ebola
      response, particularly because survivors might have some immunity to the same
      virus strain. In previous outbreaks, survivors served as burial team members,
      contact tracers, and community educators promoting messages that seeking
      treatment improves the chances for survival and that persons who survived Ebola
      can help their communities. As caregivers in Ebola treatment units, survivors
      have encouraged patients to stay hydrated and eat and inspired them to believe
      that they, too, can survive. Survivors regaining livelihood through participation
      in the response might offset the stigma associated with Ebola.
FAU - Lee-Kwan, Seung Hee
AU  - Lee-Kwan SH
FAU - DeLuca, Nickolas
AU  - DeLuca N
FAU - Adams, Monica
AU  - Adams M
FAU - Dalling, Matthew
AU  - Dalling M
FAU - Drevlow, Elizabeth
AU  - Drevlow E
FAU - Gassama, Gladys
AU  - Gassama G
FAU - Davies, Tina
AU  - Davies T
CN  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Epidemics/*prevention & control
MH  - Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/epidemiology/*prevention & control
MH  - Humans
MH  - Sierra Leone/epidemiology
MH  - *Social Support
MH  - Survivors/*psychology
EDAT- 2014/12/19 06:00
MHDA- 2015/02/14 06:00
CRDT- 2014/12/19 06:00
AID - mm6350a6 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014 Dec 19;63(50):1205-6.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Lee-Kwan, Seung Hee
AU  - DeLuca, Nickolas
AU  - Adams, Monica
AU  - Dalling, Matthew
AU  - Drevlow, Elizabeth
AU  - Gassama, Gladys
AU  - Davies, Tina
AU  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
PY  - 2014/Dec/19
TI  - Support services for survivors of ebola virus disease - Sierra Leone, 2014.
T2  - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
JO  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
SP  - 1205
EP  - 1206
VL  - 63
IS  - 50
KW  - Epidemics
KW  - Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola
KW  - Humans
KW  - Sierra Leone
KW  - Social Support
KW  - Survivors
N2  - As of December 6, 2014, Sierra Leone reported 6,317 laboratory-confirmed cases of Ebola virus disease (Ebola), the highest number of reported cases in the current West Africa epidemic. The Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation reported that as of December 6, 2014, there were 1,181 persons who had survived and were discharged. Survivors from previous Ebola outbreaks have reported major barriers to resuming normal lives after release from treatment, such as emotional distress, health issues, loss of possessions, and difficulty regaining their livelihoods. In August 2014, a knowledge, attitude, and practice survey regarding the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, administered by a consortium of partners that included the Ministry of Health and Sanitation, UNICEF, CDC, and a local nongovernmental organization, Focus 1000, found that 96% of the general population respondents reported some discriminatory attitude towards persons with suspected or known Ebola. Access to increased psychosocial support, provision of goods, and family and community reunification programs might reduce these barriers. Survivors also have unique potential to contribute to the Ebola response, particularly because survivors might have some immunity to the same virus strain. In previous outbreaks, survivors served as burial team members, contact tracers, and community educators promoting messages that seeking treatment improves the chances for survival and that persons who survived Ebola can help their communities. As caregivers in Ebola treatment units, survivors have encouraged patients to stay hydrated and eat and inspired them to believe that they, too, can survive. Survivors regaining livelihood through participation in the response might offset the stigma associated with Ebola.
SN  - 1545-861X
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25522090
ID  - Lee-Kwan2014
ER  - 
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