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Impact of virus strain characteristics on early detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza infection in commercial table-egg layer flocks and implications for outbreak control.

Abstract Early detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) infection in commercial poultry flocks is a critical component of outbreak control. Reducing the time to detect HPAI infection can reduce the risk of disease transmission to other flocks. The timeliness of different types of detection triggers could be dependent on clinical signs that are first observed in a flock, signs that might vary due to HPAI virus strain characteristics. We developed a stochastic disease transmission model to evaluate how transmission characteristics of various HPAI strains might effect the relative importance of increased mortality, drop in egg production, or daily real-time reverse transcriptase (RRT)-PCR testing, toward detecting HPAI infection in a commercial table-egg layer flock. On average, daily RRT-PCR testing resulted in the shortest time to detection (from 3.5 to 6.1 days) depending on the HPAI virus strain and was less variable over a range of transmission parameters compared with other triggers evaluated. Our results indicate that a trigger to detect a drop in egg production would be useful for HPAI virus strains with long infectious periods (6-8 days) and including an egg-drop detection trigger in emergency response plans would lead to earlier and consistent reporting in some cases. We discuss implications for outbreak control and risk of HPAI spread attributed to different HPAI strain characteristics where an increase in mortality or a drop in egg production or both would be among the first clinical signs observed in an infected flock.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Chickens

Keywords
Journal Title avian diseases
Publication Year Start
%A Weaver, J. Todd; Malladi, Sasidhar; Goldsmith, Timothy J.; Hueston, Will; Hennessey, Morgan; Lee, Brendan; Voss, Shauna; Funk, Janel; Der, Christina; Bjork, Kathe E.; Clouse, Timothy L.; Halvorson, David A.
%T Impact of virus strain characteristics on early detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza infection in commercial table-egg layer flocks and implications for outbreak control.
%J Avian diseases, vol. 56, no. 4 Suppl, pp. 905-912
%D 12/2012
%V 56
%N 4 Suppl
%M eng
%B Early detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) infection in commercial poultry flocks is a critical component of outbreak control. Reducing the time to detect HPAI infection can reduce the risk of disease transmission to other flocks. The timeliness of different types of detection triggers could be dependent on clinical signs that are first observed in a flock, signs that might vary due to HPAI virus strain characteristics. We developed a stochastic disease transmission model to evaluate how transmission characteristics of various HPAI strains might effect the relative importance of increased mortality, drop in egg production, or daily real-time reverse transcriptase (RRT)-PCR testing, toward detecting HPAI infection in a commercial table-egg layer flock. On average, daily RRT-PCR testing resulted in the shortest time to detection (from 3.5 to 6.1 days) depending on the HPAI virus strain and was less variable over a range of transmission parameters compared with other triggers evaluated. Our results indicate that a trigger to detect a drop in egg production would be useful for HPAI virus strains with long infectious periods (6-8 days) and including an egg-drop detection trigger in emergency response plans would lead to earlier and consistent reporting in some cases. We discuss implications for outbreak control and risk of HPAI spread attributed to different HPAI strain characteristics where an increase in mortality or a drop in egg production or both would be among the first clinical signs observed in an infected flock.
%K Animals, Chickens, Disease Outbreaks, Eggs, Female, Influenza A virus, Influenza in Birds, Models, Biological, Models, Statistical, Oviposition, Stochastic Processes
%P 905
%L 912
%Y 10.1637/10189-041012-Reg.1
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2012.......56..905W

@Article{Weaver2012,
author="Weaver, J. Todd
and Malladi, Sasidhar
and Goldsmith, Timothy J.
and Hueston, Will
and Hennessey, Morgan
and Lee, Brendan
and Voss, Shauna
and Funk, Janel
and Der, Christina
and Bjork, Kathe E.
and Clouse, Timothy L.
and Halvorson, David A.",
title="Impact of virus strain characteristics on early detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza infection in commercial table-egg layer flocks and implications for outbreak control.",
journal="Avian diseases",
year="2012",
month="Dec",
volume="56",
number="4 Suppl",
pages="905--912",
keywords="Animals",
keywords="Chickens",
keywords="Disease Outbreaks",
keywords="Eggs",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Influenza A virus",
keywords="Influenza in Birds",
keywords="Models, Biological",
keywords="Models, Statistical",
keywords="Oviposition",
keywords="Stochastic Processes",
abstract="Early detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) infection in commercial poultry flocks is a critical component of outbreak control. Reducing the time to detect HPAI infection can reduce the risk of disease transmission to other flocks. The timeliness of different types of detection triggers could be dependent on clinical signs that are first observed in a flock, signs that might vary due to HPAI virus strain characteristics. We developed a stochastic disease transmission model to evaluate how transmission characteristics of various HPAI strains might effect the relative importance of increased mortality, drop in egg production, or daily real-time reverse transcriptase (RRT)-PCR testing, toward detecting HPAI infection in a commercial table-egg layer flock. On average, daily RRT-PCR testing resulted in the shortest time to detection (from 3.5 to 6.1 days) depending on the HPAI virus strain and was less variable over a range of transmission parameters compared with other triggers evaluated. Our results indicate that a trigger to detect a drop in egg production would be useful for HPAI virus strains with long infectious periods (6-8 days) and including an egg-drop detection trigger in emergency response plans would lead to earlier and consistent reporting in some cases. We discuss implications for outbreak control and risk of HPAI spread attributed to different HPAI strain characteristics where an increase in mortality or a drop in egg production or both would be among the first clinical signs observed in an infected flock.",
issn="0005-2086",
doi="10.1637/10189-041012-Reg.1",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23402111",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Impact of virus strain characteristics on early detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza infection in commercial table-egg layer flocks and implications for outbreak control.
%A Weaver, J. Todd
%A Malladi, Sasidhar
%A Goldsmith, Timothy J.
%A Hueston, Will
%A Hennessey, Morgan
%A Lee, Brendan
%A Voss, Shauna
%A Funk, Janel
%A Der, Christina
%A Bjork, Kathe E.
%A Clouse, Timothy L.
%A Halvorson, David A.
%J Avian diseases
%D 2012
%8 Dec
%V 56
%N 4 Suppl
%@ 0005-2086
%G eng
%F Weaver2012
%X Early detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) infection in commercial poultry flocks is a critical component of outbreak control. Reducing the time to detect HPAI infection can reduce the risk of disease transmission to other flocks. The timeliness of different types of detection triggers could be dependent on clinical signs that are first observed in a flock, signs that might vary due to HPAI virus strain characteristics. We developed a stochastic disease transmission model to evaluate how transmission characteristics of various HPAI strains might effect the relative importance of increased mortality, drop in egg production, or daily real-time reverse transcriptase (RRT)-PCR testing, toward detecting HPAI infection in a commercial table-egg layer flock. On average, daily RRT-PCR testing resulted in the shortest time to detection (from 3.5 to 6.1 days) depending on the HPAI virus strain and was less variable over a range of transmission parameters compared with other triggers evaluated. Our results indicate that a trigger to detect a drop in egg production would be useful for HPAI virus strains with long infectious periods (6-8 days) and including an egg-drop detection trigger in emergency response plans would lead to earlier and consistent reporting in some cases. We discuss implications for outbreak control and risk of HPAI spread attributed to different HPAI strain characteristics where an increase in mortality or a drop in egg production or both would be among the first clinical signs observed in an infected flock.
%K Animals
%K Chickens
%K Disease Outbreaks
%K Eggs
%K Female
%K Influenza A virus
%K Influenza in Birds
%K Models, Biological
%K Models, Statistical
%K Oviposition
%K Stochastic Processes
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1637/10189-041012-Reg.1
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23402111
%P 905-912

PT Journal
AU Weaver, JT
   Malladi, S
   Goldsmith, TJ
   Hueston, W
   Hennessey, M
   Lee, B
   Voss, S
   Funk, J
   Der, C
   Bjork, KE
   Clouse, TL
   Halvorson, DA
TI Impact of virus strain characteristics on early detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza infection in commercial table-egg layer flocks and implications for outbreak control.
SO Avian diseases
JI Avian Dis.
PD Dec
PY 2012
BP 905
EP 912
VL 56
IS 4 Suppl
DI 10.1637/10189-041012-Reg.1
LA eng
DE Animals; Chickens; Disease Outbreaks; Eggs; Female; Influenza A virus; Influenza in Birds; Models, Biological; Models, Statistical; Oviposition; Stochastic Processes
AB Early detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) infection in commercial poultry flocks is a critical component of outbreak control. Reducing the time to detect HPAI infection can reduce the risk of disease transmission to other flocks. The timeliness of different types of detection triggers could be dependent on clinical signs that are first observed in a flock, signs that might vary due to HPAI virus strain characteristics. We developed a stochastic disease transmission model to evaluate how transmission characteristics of various HPAI strains might effect the relative importance of increased mortality, drop in egg production, or daily real-time reverse transcriptase (RRT)-PCR testing, toward detecting HPAI infection in a commercial table-egg layer flock. On average, daily RRT-PCR testing resulted in the shortest time to detection (from 3.5 to 6.1 days) depending on the HPAI virus strain and was less variable over a range of transmission parameters compared with other triggers evaluated. Our results indicate that a trigger to detect a drop in egg production would be useful for HPAI virus strains with long infectious periods (6-8 days) and including an egg-drop detection trigger in emergency response plans would lead to earlier and consistent reporting in some cases. We discuss implications for outbreak control and risk of HPAI spread attributed to different HPAI strain characteristics where an increase in mortality or a drop in egg production or both would be among the first clinical signs observed in an infected flock.
ER

PMID- 23402111
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20130213
DCOM- 20130410
IS  - 0005-2086 (Print)
IS  - 0005-2086 (Linking)
VI  - 56
IP  - 4 Suppl
DP  - 2012 Dec
TI  - Impact of virus strain characteristics on early detection of highly pathogenic
      avian influenza infection in commercial table-egg layer flocks and implications
      for outbreak control.
PG  - 905-12
AB  - Early detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) infection in
      commercial poultry flocks is a critical component of outbreak control. Reducing
      the time to detect HPAI infection can reduce the risk of disease transmission to 
      other flocks. The timeliness of different types of detection triggers could be
      dependent on clinical signs that are first observed in a flock, signs that might 
      vary due to HPAI virus strain characteristics. We developed a stochastic disease 
      transmission model to evaluate how transmission characteristics of various HPAI
      strains might effect the relative importance of increased mortality, drop in egg 
      production, or daily real-time reverse transcriptase (RRT)-PCR testing, toward
      detecting HPAI infection in a commercial table-egg layer flock. On average, daily
      RRT-PCR testing resulted in the shortest time to detection (from 3.5 to 6.1 days)
      depending on the HPAI virus strain and was less variable over a range of
      transmission parameters compared with other triggers evaluated. Our results
      indicate that a trigger to detect a drop in egg production would be useful for
      HPAI virus strains with long infectious periods (6-8 days) and including an
      egg-drop detection trigger in emergency response plans would lead to earlier and 
      consistent reporting in some cases. We discuss implications for outbreak control 
      and risk of HPAI spread attributed to different HPAI strain characteristics where
      an increase in mortality or a drop in egg production or both would be among the
      first clinical signs observed in an infected flock.
FAU - Weaver, J Todd
AU  - Weaver JT
AD  - USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, Centers for
      Epidemiology and Animal Health, Center for Animal Health Information and
      Analysis, Natural Resource Research Center, Building B MS-2W4, 2150 Centre
      Avenue, Fort Collins, CO 80526, USA. [email protected]
FAU - Malladi, Sasidhar
AU  - Malladi S
FAU - Goldsmith, Timothy J
AU  - Goldsmith TJ
FAU - Hueston, Will
AU  - Hueston W
FAU - Hennessey, Morgan
AU  - Hennessey M
FAU - Lee, Brendan
AU  - Lee B
FAU - Voss, Shauna
AU  - Voss S
FAU - Funk, Janel
AU  - Funk J
FAU - Der, Christina
AU  - Der C
FAU - Bjork, Kathe E
AU  - Bjork KE
FAU - Clouse, Timothy L
AU  - Clouse TL
FAU - Halvorson, David A
AU  - Halvorson DA
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Avian Dis
JT  - Avian diseases
JID - 0370617
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - *Chickens
MH  - Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control/*veterinary
MH  - Eggs
MH  - Female
MH  - Influenza A virus/*classification
MH  - Influenza in Birds/diagnosis/*virology
MH  - Models, Biological
MH  - Models, Statistical
MH  - Oviposition
MH  - Stochastic Processes
EDAT- 2013/02/14 06:00
MHDA- 2013/04/11 06:00
CRDT- 2013/02/14 06:00
AID - 10.1637/10189-041012-Reg.1 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Avian Dis. 2012 Dec;56(4 Suppl):905-12.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Weaver, J. Todd
AU  - Malladi, Sasidhar
AU  - Goldsmith, Timothy J.
AU  - Hueston, Will
AU  - Hennessey, Morgan
AU  - Lee, Brendan
AU  - Voss, Shauna
AU  - Funk, Janel
AU  - Der, Christina
AU  - Bjork, Kathe E.
AU  - Clouse, Timothy L.
AU  - Halvorson, David A.
PY  - 2012/Dec/
TI  - Impact of virus strain characteristics on early detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza infection in commercial table-egg layer flocks and implications for outbreak control.
T2  - Avian Dis.
JO  - Avian diseases
SP  - 905
EP  - 912
VL  - 56
IS  - 4 Suppl
KW  - Animals
KW  - Chickens
KW  - Disease Outbreaks
KW  - Eggs
KW  - Female
KW  - Influenza A virus
KW  - Influenza in Birds
KW  - Models, Biological
KW  - Models, Statistical
KW  - Oviposition
KW  - Stochastic Processes
N2  - Early detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) infection in commercial poultry flocks is a critical component of outbreak control. Reducing the time to detect HPAI infection can reduce the risk of disease transmission to other flocks. The timeliness of different types of detection triggers could be dependent on clinical signs that are first observed in a flock, signs that might vary due to HPAI virus strain characteristics. We developed a stochastic disease transmission model to evaluate how transmission characteristics of various HPAI strains might effect the relative importance of increased mortality, drop in egg production, or daily real-time reverse transcriptase (RRT)-PCR testing, toward detecting HPAI infection in a commercial table-egg layer flock. On average, daily RRT-PCR testing resulted in the shortest time to detection (from 3.5 to 6.1 days) depending on the HPAI virus strain and was less variable over a range of transmission parameters compared with other triggers evaluated. Our results indicate that a trigger to detect a drop in egg production would be useful for HPAI virus strains with long infectious periods (6-8 days) and including an egg-drop detection trigger in emergency response plans would lead to earlier and consistent reporting in some cases. We discuss implications for outbreak control and risk of HPAI spread attributed to different HPAI strain characteristics where an increase in mortality or a drop in egg production or both would be among the first clinical signs observed in an infected flock.
SN  - 0005-2086
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.1637/10189-041012-Reg.1
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23402111
ID  - Weaver2012
ER  - 
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<b:Comments>Early detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) infection in commercial poultry flocks is a critical component of outbreak control. Reducing the time to detect HPAI infection can reduce the risk of disease transmission to other flocks. The timeliness of different types of detection triggers could be dependent on clinical signs that are first observed in a flock, signs that might vary due to HPAI virus strain characteristics. We developed a stochastic disease transmission model to evaluate how transmission characteristics of various HPAI strains might effect the relative importance of increased mortality, drop in egg production, or daily real-time reverse transcriptase (RRT)-PCR testing, toward detecting HPAI infection in a commercial table-egg layer flock. On average, daily RRT-PCR testing resulted in the shortest time to detection (from 3.5 to 6.1 days) depending on the HPAI virus strain and was less variable over a range of transmission parameters compared with other triggers evaluated. Our results indicate that a trigger to detect a drop in egg production would be useful for HPAI virus strains with long infectious periods (6-8 days) and including an egg-drop detection trigger in emergency response plans would lead to earlier and consistent reporting in some cases. We discuss implications for outbreak control and risk of HPAI spread attributed to different HPAI strain characteristics where an increase in mortality or a drop in egg production or both would be among the first clinical signs observed in an infected flock.</b:Comments>
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