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Cluster of sylvatic epidemic typhus cases associated with flying squirrels, 2004-2006.

Abstract In February 2006, a diagnosis of sylvatic epidemic typhus in a counselor at a wilderness camp in Pennsylvania prompted a retrospective investigation. From January 2004 through January 2006, 3 more cases were identified. All had been counselors at the camp and had experienced febrile illness with myalgia, chills, and sweats; 2 had been hospitalized. All patients had slept in the same cabin and reported having seen and heard flying squirrels inside the wall adjacent to their bed. Serum from each patient had evidence of infection with Rickettsia prowazekii. Analysis of blood and tissue from 14 southern flying squirrels trapped in the woodlands around the cabin indicated that 71% were infected with R. prowazekii. Education and control measures to exclude flying squirrels from housing are essential to reduce the likelihood of sylvatic epidemic typhus.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title emerging infectious diseases
Publication Year Start
%A Chapman, Alice S.; Swerdlow, David L.; Dato, Virginia M.; Anderson, Alicia D.; Moodie, Claire E.; Marriott, Chandra; Amman, Brian; Hennessey, Morgan; Fox, Perry; Green, Douglas B.; Pegg, Eric; Nicholson, William L.; Eremeeva, Marina E.; Dasch, Gregory A.
%T Cluster of sylvatic epidemic typhus cases associated with flying squirrels, 2004-2006.
%J Emerging infectious diseases, vol. 15, no. 7, pp. 1005-1011
%D 07/2009
%V 15
%N 7
%M eng
%B In February 2006, a diagnosis of sylvatic epidemic typhus in a counselor at a wilderness camp in Pennsylvania prompted a retrospective investigation. From January 2004 through January 2006, 3 more cases were identified. All had been counselors at the camp and had experienced febrile illness with myalgia, chills, and sweats; 2 had been hospitalized. All patients had slept in the same cabin and reported having seen and heard flying squirrels inside the wall adjacent to their bed. Serum from each patient had evidence of infection with Rickettsia prowazekii. Analysis of blood and tissue from 14 southern flying squirrels trapped in the woodlands around the cabin indicated that 71% were infected with R. prowazekii. Education and control measures to exclude flying squirrels from housing are essential to reduce the likelihood of sylvatic epidemic typhus.
%K Adult, Animals, Disease Reservoirs, Education, Medical, Continuing, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Male, Pennsylvania, Rickettsia prowazekii, Sciuridae, Surveys and Questionnaires, Typhus, Epidemic Louse-Borne
%P 1005
%L 1011
%Y 10.3201/eid1507.081305
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2009.......15.1005C

@Article{Chapman2009,
author="Chapman, Alice S.
and Swerdlow, David L.
and Dato, Virginia M.
and Anderson, Alicia D.
and Moodie, Claire E.
and Marriott, Chandra
and Amman, Brian
and Hennessey, Morgan
and Fox, Perry
and Green, Douglas B.
and Pegg, Eric
and Nicholson, William L.
and Eremeeva, Marina E.
and Dasch, Gregory A.",
title="Cluster of sylvatic epidemic typhus cases associated with flying squirrels, 2004-2006.",
journal="Emerging infectious diseases",
year="2009",
month="Jul",
volume="15",
number="7",
pages="1005--1011",
keywords="Adult",
keywords="Animals",
keywords="Disease Reservoirs",
keywords="Education, Medical, Continuing",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Interviews as Topic",
keywords="Male",
keywords="Pennsylvania",
keywords="Rickettsia prowazekii",
keywords="Sciuridae",
keywords="Surveys and Questionnaires",
keywords="Typhus, Epidemic Louse-Borne",
abstract="In February 2006, a diagnosis of sylvatic epidemic typhus in a counselor at a wilderness camp in Pennsylvania prompted a retrospective investigation. From January 2004 through January 2006, 3 more cases were identified. All had been counselors at the camp and had experienced febrile illness with myalgia, chills, and sweats; 2 had been hospitalized. All patients had slept in the same cabin and reported having seen and heard flying squirrels inside the wall adjacent to their bed. Serum from each patient had evidence of infection with Rickettsia prowazekii. Analysis of blood and tissue from 14 southern flying squirrels trapped in the woodlands around the cabin indicated that 71\% were infected with R. prowazekii. Education and control measures to exclude flying squirrels from housing are essential to reduce the likelihood of sylvatic epidemic typhus.",
issn="1080-6059",
doi="10.3201/eid1507.081305",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19624912",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Cluster of sylvatic epidemic typhus cases associated with flying squirrels, 2004-2006.
%A Chapman, Alice S.
%A Swerdlow, David L.
%A Dato, Virginia M.
%A Anderson, Alicia D.
%A Moodie, Claire E.
%A Marriott, Chandra
%A Amman, Brian
%A Hennessey, Morgan
%A Fox, Perry
%A Green, Douglas B.
%A Pegg, Eric
%A Nicholson, William L.
%A Eremeeva, Marina E.
%A Dasch, Gregory A.
%J Emerging infectious diseases
%D 2009
%8 Jul
%V 15
%N 7
%@ 1080-6059
%G eng
%F Chapman2009
%X In February 2006, a diagnosis of sylvatic epidemic typhus in a counselor at a wilderness camp in Pennsylvania prompted a retrospective investigation. From January 2004 through January 2006, 3 more cases were identified. All had been counselors at the camp and had experienced febrile illness with myalgia, chills, and sweats; 2 had been hospitalized. All patients had slept in the same cabin and reported having seen and heard flying squirrels inside the wall adjacent to their bed. Serum from each patient had evidence of infection with Rickettsia prowazekii. Analysis of blood and tissue from 14 southern flying squirrels trapped in the woodlands around the cabin indicated that 71% were infected with R. prowazekii. Education and control measures to exclude flying squirrels from housing are essential to reduce the likelihood of sylvatic epidemic typhus.
%K Adult
%K Animals
%K Disease Reservoirs
%K Education, Medical, Continuing
%K Humans
%K Interviews as Topic
%K Male
%K Pennsylvania
%K Rickettsia prowazekii
%K Sciuridae
%K Surveys and Questionnaires
%K Typhus, Epidemic Louse-Borne
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1507.081305
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19624912
%P 1005-1011

PT Journal
AU Chapman, AS
   Swerdlow, DL
   Dato, VM
   Anderson, AD
   Moodie, CE
   Marriott, C
   Amman, B
   Hennessey, M
   Fox, P
   Green, DB
   Pegg, E
   Nicholson, WL
   Eremeeva, ME
   Dasch, GA
TI Cluster of sylvatic epidemic typhus cases associated with flying squirrels, 2004-2006.
SO Emerging infectious diseases
JI Emerging Infect. Dis.
PD Jul
PY 2009
BP 1005
EP 1011
VL 15
IS 7
DI 10.3201/eid1507.081305
LA eng
DE Adult; Animals; Disease Reservoirs; Education, Medical, Continuing; Humans; Interviews as Topic; Male; Pennsylvania; Rickettsia prowazekii; Sciuridae; Surveys and Questionnaires; Typhus, Epidemic Louse-Borne
AB In February 2006, a diagnosis of sylvatic epidemic typhus in a counselor at a wilderness camp in Pennsylvania prompted a retrospective investigation. From January 2004 through January 2006, 3 more cases were identified. All had been counselors at the camp and had experienced febrile illness with myalgia, chills, and sweats; 2 had been hospitalized. All patients had slept in the same cabin and reported having seen and heard flying squirrels inside the wall adjacent to their bed. Serum from each patient had evidence of infection with Rickettsia prowazekii. Analysis of blood and tissue from 14 southern flying squirrels trapped in the woodlands around the cabin indicated that 71% were infected with R. prowazekii. Education and control measures to exclude flying squirrels from housing are essential to reduce the likelihood of sylvatic epidemic typhus.
ER

PMID- 19624912
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20090723
DCOM- 20090928
LR  - 20151119
IS  - 1080-6059 (Electronic)
IS  - 1080-6040 (Linking)
VI  - 15
IP  - 7
DP  - 2009 Jul
TI  - Cluster of sylvatic epidemic typhus cases associated with flying squirrels,
      2004-2006.
PG  - 1005-11
LID - 10.3201/eid1507.081305 [doi]
AB  - In February 2006, a diagnosis of sylvatic epidemic typhus in a counselor at a
      wilderness camp in Pennsylvania prompted a retrospective investigation. From
      January 2004 through January 2006, 3 more cases were identified. All had been
      counselors at the camp and had experienced febrile illness with myalgia, chills, 
      and sweats; 2 had been hospitalized. All patients had slept in the same cabin and
      reported having seen and heard flying squirrels inside the wall adjacent to their
      bed. Serum from each patient had evidence of infection with Rickettsia
      prowazekii. Analysis of blood and tissue from 14 southern flying squirrels
      trapped in the woodlands around the cabin indicated that 71% were infected with
      R. prowazekii. Education and control measures to exclude flying squirrels from
      housing are essential to reduce the likelihood of sylvatic epidemic typhus.
FAU - Chapman, Alice S
AU  - Chapman AS
AD  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA.
FAU - Swerdlow, David L
AU  - Swerdlow DL
FAU - Dato, Virginia M
AU  - Dato VM
FAU - Anderson, Alicia D
AU  - Anderson AD
FAU - Moodie, Claire E
AU  - Moodie CE
FAU - Marriott, Chandra
AU  - Marriott C
FAU - Amman, Brian
AU  - Amman B
FAU - Hennessey, Morgan
AU  - Hennessey M
FAU - Fox, Perry
AU  - Fox P
FAU - Green, Douglas B
AU  - Green DB
FAU - Pegg, Eric
AU  - Pegg E
FAU - Nicholson, William L
AU  - Nicholson WL
FAU - Eremeeva, Marina E
AU  - Eremeeva ME
FAU - Dasch, Gregory A
AU  - Dasch GA
LA  - eng
PT  - Case Reports
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Emerg Infect Dis
JT  - Emerging infectious diseases
JID - 9508155
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Animals
MH  - Disease Reservoirs
MH  - Education, Medical, Continuing
MH  - Humans
MH  - Interviews as Topic
MH  - Male
MH  - Pennsylvania
MH  - Rickettsia prowazekii/isolation & purification
MH  - Sciuridae/*microbiology
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
MH  - Typhus, Epidemic Louse-Borne/complications/*epidemiology/transmission
PMC - PMC2744229
OID - NLM: PMC2744229
EDAT- 2009/07/25 09:00
MHDA- 2009/09/29 06:00
CRDT- 2009/07/24 09:00
AID - 10.3201/eid1507.081305 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Emerg Infect Dis. 2009 Jul;15(7):1005-11. doi: 10.3201/eid1507.081305.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Chapman, Alice S.
AU  - Swerdlow, David L.
AU  - Dato, Virginia M.
AU  - Anderson, Alicia D.
AU  - Moodie, Claire E.
AU  - Marriott, Chandra
AU  - Amman, Brian
AU  - Hennessey, Morgan
AU  - Fox, Perry
AU  - Green, Douglas B.
AU  - Pegg, Eric
AU  - Nicholson, William L.
AU  - Eremeeva, Marina E.
AU  - Dasch, Gregory A.
PY  - 2009/Jul/
TI  - Cluster of sylvatic epidemic typhus cases associated with flying squirrels, 2004-2006.
T2  - Emerging Infect. Dis.
JO  - Emerging infectious diseases
SP  - 1005
EP  - 1011
VL  - 15
IS  - 7
KW  - Adult
KW  - Animals
KW  - Disease Reservoirs
KW  - Education, Medical, Continuing
KW  - Humans
KW  - Interviews as Topic
KW  - Male
KW  - Pennsylvania
KW  - Rickettsia prowazekii
KW  - Sciuridae
KW  - Surveys and Questionnaires
KW  - Typhus, Epidemic Louse-Borne
N2  - In February 2006, a diagnosis of sylvatic epidemic typhus in a counselor at a wilderness camp in Pennsylvania prompted a retrospective investigation. From January 2004 through January 2006, 3 more cases were identified. All had been counselors at the camp and had experienced febrile illness with myalgia, chills, and sweats; 2 had been hospitalized. All patients had slept in the same cabin and reported having seen and heard flying squirrels inside the wall adjacent to their bed. Serum from each patient had evidence of infection with Rickettsia prowazekii. Analysis of blood and tissue from 14 southern flying squirrels trapped in the woodlands around the cabin indicated that 71% were infected with R. prowazekii. Education and control measures to exclude flying squirrels from housing are essential to reduce the likelihood of sylvatic epidemic typhus.
SN  - 1080-6059
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1507.081305
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19624912
ID  - Chapman2009
ER  - 
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