PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

A randomized trial evaluating tobacco possession-use-purchase laws in the USA.

Abstract Tobacco Purchase-Use-Possession laws (PUP) are being implemented throughout the US, but it is still unclear whether they are effective in reducing smoking prevalence among the youth targeted by these public health policies. In the present study, 24 towns in Northern Illinois were randomly assigned to one of two conditions. One condition involved reducing commercial sources of youth access to tobacco (Control), whereas the second involved both reducing commercial sources of youth access to tobacco as well as fining minors for possessing or using tobacco (Experimental). Students in 24 towns in Northern Illinois in the United States completed a 74 item self-report survey in 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005. At the start of the study, students were in grades 7-10. During each time period, students were classified as current smokers or nonsmokers (i.e., completely abstinent for the 30 consecutive days prior to assessment). The analyses included 25,404 different students and 50,725 assessments over the four time periods. A hierarchical linear modeling analytical approach was selected due to the multilevel data (i.e., town-level variables and individual-level variables), and nested design of sampling of youth within towns. Findings indicated that the rates of current smoking were not significantly different between the two conditions at baseline, but over time, rates increased significantly less quickly for adolescents in Experimental than those in Control towns. The implications of these findings are discussed.
PMID
Related Publications

Youth access to tobacco.

Do fines for violating possession-use-purchase laws reduce youth tobacco use?

Tobacco possession, use, and purchase laws and penalties in Minnesota: enforcement, tobacco diversion programs, and youth awareness.

Effects of youth tobacco access and possession policy interventions on heavy adolescent smokers.

Youth tobacco access and possession policy interventions: effects on observed and perceived tobacco use.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Law Enforcement

Legislation as Topic

Keywords
Journal Title social science & medicine (1982)
Publication Year Start
%A Jason, Leonard A.; Pokorny, Steven B.; Adams, Monica
%T A randomized trial evaluating tobacco possession-use-purchase laws in the USA.
%J Social science & medicine (1982), vol. 67, no. 11, pp. 1700-1707
%D 12/2008
%V 67
%N 11
%M eng
%B Tobacco Purchase-Use-Possession laws (PUP) are being implemented throughout the US, but it is still unclear whether they are effective in reducing smoking prevalence among the youth targeted by these public health policies. In the present study, 24 towns in Northern Illinois were randomly assigned to one of two conditions. One condition involved reducing commercial sources of youth access to tobacco (Control), whereas the second involved both reducing commercial sources of youth access to tobacco as well as fining minors for possessing or using tobacco (Experimental). Students in 24 towns in Northern Illinois in the United States completed a 74 item self-report survey in 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005. At the start of the study, students were in grades 7-10. During each time period, students were classified as current smokers or nonsmokers (i.e., completely abstinent for the 30 consecutive days prior to assessment). The analyses included 25,404 different students and 50,725 assessments over the four time periods. A hierarchical linear modeling analytical approach was selected due to the multilevel data (i.e., town-level variables and individual-level variables), and nested design of sampling of youth within towns. Findings indicated that the rates of current smoking were not significantly different between the two conditions at baseline, but over time, rates increased significantly less quickly for adolescents in Experimental than those in Control towns. The implications of these findings are discussed.
%K Adolescent, Adolescent Behavior, Child, Female, Humans, Illinois, Law Enforcement, Legislation as Topic, Male, Prevalence, Smoking Cessation, Tobacco Use Disorder
%P 1700
%L 1707
%Y 10.1016/j.socscimed.2008.09.028
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2008.......67.1700J

@Article{Jason2008,
author="Jason, Leonard A.
and Pokorny, Steven B.
and Adams, Monica",
title="A randomized trial evaluating tobacco possession-use-purchase laws in the USA.",
journal="Social science \& medicine (1982)",
year="2008",
month="Dec",
day="22",
volume="67",
number="11",
pages="1700--1707",
keywords="Adolescent",
keywords="Adolescent Behavior",
keywords="Child",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Illinois",
keywords="Law Enforcement",
keywords="Legislation as Topic",
keywords="Male",
keywords="Prevalence",
keywords="Smoking Cessation",
keywords="Tobacco Use Disorder",
abstract="Tobacco Purchase-Use-Possession laws (PUP) are being implemented throughout the US, but it is still unclear whether they are effective in reducing smoking prevalence among the youth targeted by these public health policies. In the present study, 24 towns in Northern Illinois were randomly assigned to one of two conditions. One condition involved reducing commercial sources of youth access to tobacco (Control), whereas the second involved both reducing commercial sources of youth access to tobacco as well as fining minors for possessing or using tobacco (Experimental). Students in 24 towns in Northern Illinois in the United States completed a 74 item self-report survey in 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005. At the start of the study, students were in grades 7-10. During each time period, students were classified as current smokers or nonsmokers (i.e., completely abstinent for the 30 consecutive days prior to assessment). The analyses included 25,404 different students and 50,725 assessments over the four time periods. A hierarchical linear modeling analytical approach was selected due to the multilevel data (i.e., town-level variables and individual-level variables), and nested design of sampling of youth within towns. Findings indicated that the rates of current smoking were not significantly different between the two conditions at baseline, but over time, rates increased significantly less quickly for adolescents in Experimental than those in Control towns. The implications of these findings are discussed.",
issn="0277-9536",
doi="10.1016/j.socscimed.2008.09.028",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18947913",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T A randomized trial evaluating tobacco possession-use-purchase laws in the USA.
%A Jason, Leonard A.
%A Pokorny, Steven B.
%A Adams, Monica
%J Social science & medicine (1982)
%D 2008
%8 Dec 22
%V 67
%N 11
%@ 0277-9536
%G eng
%F Jason2008
%X Tobacco Purchase-Use-Possession laws (PUP) are being implemented throughout the US, but it is still unclear whether they are effective in reducing smoking prevalence among the youth targeted by these public health policies. In the present study, 24 towns in Northern Illinois were randomly assigned to one of two conditions. One condition involved reducing commercial sources of youth access to tobacco (Control), whereas the second involved both reducing commercial sources of youth access to tobacco as well as fining minors for possessing or using tobacco (Experimental). Students in 24 towns in Northern Illinois in the United States completed a 74 item self-report survey in 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005. At the start of the study, students were in grades 7-10. During each time period, students were classified as current smokers or nonsmokers (i.e., completely abstinent for the 30 consecutive days prior to assessment). The analyses included 25,404 different students and 50,725 assessments over the four time periods. A hierarchical linear modeling analytical approach was selected due to the multilevel data (i.e., town-level variables and individual-level variables), and nested design of sampling of youth within towns. Findings indicated that the rates of current smoking were not significantly different between the two conditions at baseline, but over time, rates increased significantly less quickly for adolescents in Experimental than those in Control towns. The implications of these findings are discussed.
%K Adolescent
%K Adolescent Behavior
%K Child
%K Female
%K Humans
%K Illinois
%K Law Enforcement
%K Legislation as Topic
%K Male
%K Prevalence
%K Smoking Cessation
%K Tobacco Use Disorder
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2008.09.028
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18947913
%P 1700-1707

PT Journal
AU Jason, LA
   Pokorny, SB
   Adams, M
TI A randomized trial evaluating tobacco possession-use-purchase laws in the USA.
SO Social science & medicine (1982)
JI Soc Sci Med
PD Dec
PY 2008
BP 1700
EP 1707
VL 67
IS 11
DI 10.1016/j.socscimed.2008.09.028
LA eng
DE Adolescent; Adolescent Behavior; Child; Female; Humans; Illinois; Law Enforcement; Legislation as Topic; Male; Prevalence; Smoking Cessation; Tobacco Use Disorder
AB Tobacco Purchase-Use-Possession laws (PUP) are being implemented throughout the US, but it is still unclear whether they are effective in reducing smoking prevalence among the youth targeted by these public health policies. In the present study, 24 towns in Northern Illinois were randomly assigned to one of two conditions. One condition involved reducing commercial sources of youth access to tobacco (Control), whereas the second involved both reducing commercial sources of youth access to tobacco as well as fining minors for possessing or using tobacco (Experimental). Students in 24 towns in Northern Illinois in the United States completed a 74 item self-report survey in 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005. At the start of the study, students were in grades 7-10. During each time period, students were classified as current smokers or nonsmokers (i.e., completely abstinent for the 30 consecutive days prior to assessment). The analyses included 25,404 different students and 50,725 assessments over the four time periods. A hierarchical linear modeling analytical approach was selected due to the multilevel data (i.e., town-level variables and individual-level variables), and nested design of sampling of youth within towns. Findings indicated that the rates of current smoking were not significantly different between the two conditions at baseline, but over time, rates increased significantly less quickly for adolescents in Experimental than those in Control towns. The implications of these findings are discussed.
ER

PMID- 18947913
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20081105
DCOM- 20090212
LR  - 20140912
IS  - 0277-9536 (Print)
IS  - 0277-9536 (Linking)
VI  - 67
IP  - 11
DP  - 2008 Dec
TI  - A randomized trial evaluating tobacco possession-use-purchase laws in the USA.
PG  - 1700-7
LID - 10.1016/j.socscimed.2008.09.028 [doi]
AB  - Tobacco Purchase-Use-Possession laws (PUP) are being implemented throughout the
      US, but it is still unclear whether they are effective in reducing smoking
      prevalence among the youth targeted by these public health policies. In the
      present study, 24 towns in Northern Illinois were randomly assigned to one of two
      conditions. One condition involved reducing commercial sources of youth access to
      tobacco (Control), whereas the second involved both reducing commercial sources
      of youth access to tobacco as well as fining minors for possessing or using
      tobacco (Experimental). Students in 24 towns in Northern Illinois in the United
      States completed a 74 item self-report survey in 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005. At
      the start of the study, students were in grades 7-10. During each time period,
      students were classified as current smokers or nonsmokers (i.e., completely
      abstinent for the 30 consecutive days prior to assessment). The analyses included
      25,404 different students and 50,725 assessments over the four time periods. A
      hierarchical linear modeling analytical approach was selected due to the
      multilevel data (i.e., town-level variables and individual-level variables), and 
      nested design of sampling of youth within towns. Findings indicated that the
      rates of current smoking were not significantly different between the two
      conditions at baseline, but over time, rates increased significantly less quickly
      for adolescents in Experimental than those in Control towns. The implications of 
      these findings are discussed.
FAU - Jason, Leonard A
AU  - Jason LA
AD  - DePaul University, Center for Community Research, Chicago, IL 60614, United
      States. [email protected]
FAU - Pokorny, Steven B
AU  - Pokorny SB
FAU - Adams, Monica
AU  - Adams M
LA  - eng
GR  - CA80288/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
GR  - R01 CA080288/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
GR  - R01 CA080288-02/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Randomized Controlled Trial
PT  - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
DEP - 20081022
PL  - England
TA  - Soc Sci Med
JT  - Social science & medicine (1982)
JID - 8303205
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adolescent Behavior
MH  - Child
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Illinois/epidemiology
MH  - *Law Enforcement
MH  - *Legislation as Topic
MH  - Male
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - Smoking Cessation/*legislation & jurisprudence
MH  - Tobacco Use Disorder/epidemiology/*prevention & control
PMC - PMC3169299
MID - NIHMS81161
OID - NLM: NIHMS81161
OID - NLM: PMC3169299
EDAT- 2008/10/25 09:00
MHDA- 2009/02/13 09:00
CRDT- 2008/10/25 09:00
PHST- 2007/12/18 [received]
PHST- 2008/10/22 [aheadofprint]
AID - S0277-9536(08)00438-3 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.socscimed.2008.09.028 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Soc Sci Med. 2008 Dec;67(11):1700-7. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2008.09.028. Epub
      2008 Oct 22.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Jason, Leonard A.
AU  - Pokorny, Steven B.
AU  - Adams, Monica
PY  - 2008/Dec/22
TI  - A randomized trial evaluating tobacco possession-use-purchase laws in the USA.
T2  - Soc Sci Med
JO  - Social science & medicine (1982)
SP  - 1700
EP  - 1707
VL  - 67
IS  - 11
KW  - Adolescent
KW  - Adolescent Behavior
KW  - Child
KW  - Female
KW  - Humans
KW  - Illinois
KW  - Law Enforcement
KW  - Legislation as Topic
KW  - Male
KW  - Prevalence
KW  - Smoking Cessation
KW  - Tobacco Use Disorder
N2  - Tobacco Purchase-Use-Possession laws (PUP) are being implemented throughout the US, but it is still unclear whether they are effective in reducing smoking prevalence among the youth targeted by these public health policies. In the present study, 24 towns in Northern Illinois were randomly assigned to one of two conditions. One condition involved reducing commercial sources of youth access to tobacco (Control), whereas the second involved both reducing commercial sources of youth access to tobacco as well as fining minors for possessing or using tobacco (Experimental). Students in 24 towns in Northern Illinois in the United States completed a 74 item self-report survey in 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005. At the start of the study, students were in grades 7-10. During each time period, students were classified as current smokers or nonsmokers (i.e., completely abstinent for the 30 consecutive days prior to assessment). The analyses included 25,404 different students and 50,725 assessments over the four time periods. A hierarchical linear modeling analytical approach was selected due to the multilevel data (i.e., town-level variables and individual-level variables), and nested design of sampling of youth within towns. Findings indicated that the rates of current smoking were not significantly different between the two conditions at baseline, but over time, rates increased significantly less quickly for adolescents in Experimental than those in Control towns. The implications of these findings are discussed.
SN  - 0277-9536
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2008.09.028
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18947913
ID  - Jason2008
ER  - 
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<b:Sources SelectedStyle="" xmlns:b="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography"  xmlns="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography" >
<b:Source>
<b:Tag>Jason2008</b:Tag>
<b:SourceType>ArticleInAPeriodical</b:SourceType>
<b:Year>2008</b:Year>
<b:Month>Dec</b:Month>
<b:Day>22</b:Day>
<b:PeriodicalName>Social science &amp; medicine (1982)</b:PeriodicalName>
<b:Volume>67</b:Volume>
<b:Issue>11</b:Issue>
<b:Pages>1700-1707</b:Pages>
<b:Author>
<b:Author><b:NameList>
<b:Person><b:Last>Jason</b:Last><b:First>Leonard</b:First><b:Middle>A</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Pokorny</b:Last><b:First>Steven</b:First><b:Middle>B</b:Middle></b:Person>
<b:Person><b:Last>Adams</b:Last><b:First>Monica</b:First></b:Person>
</b:NameList></b:Author>
</b:Author>
<b:Title>A randomized trial evaluating tobacco possession-use-purchase laws in the USA.</b:Title>
 <b:ShortTitle>Soc Sci Med</b:ShortTitle>
<b:Comments>Tobacco Purchase-Use-Possession laws (PUP) are being implemented throughout the US, but it is still unclear whether they are effective in reducing smoking prevalence among the youth targeted by these public health policies. In the present study, 24 towns in Northern Illinois were randomly assigned to one of two conditions. One condition involved reducing commercial sources of youth access to tobacco (Control), whereas the second involved both reducing commercial sources of youth access to tobacco as well as fining minors for possessing or using tobacco (Experimental). Students in 24 towns in Northern Illinois in the United States completed a 74 item self-report survey in 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005. At the start of the study, students were in grades 7-10. During each time period, students were classified as current smokers or nonsmokers (i.e., completely abstinent for the 30 consecutive days prior to assessment). The analyses included 25,404 different students and 50,725 assessments over the four time periods. A hierarchical linear modeling analytical approach was selected due to the multilevel data (i.e., town-level variables and individual-level variables), and nested design of sampling of youth within towns. Findings indicated that the rates of current smoking were not significantly different between the two conditions at baseline, but over time, rates increased significantly less quickly for adolescents in Experimental than those in Control towns. The implications of these findings are discussed.</b:Comments>
</b:Source>
</b:Sources>