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Do fines for violating possession-use-purchase laws reduce youth tobacco use?

Abstract The present brief report followed children exposed to consequences for violating Purchase, Use, and Possession (PUP) laws over time to assess changes in their smoking status. Youth in 24 towns were surveyed once a year for 3 years, and rates of tobacco use for those fined for PUP law violations were assessed. Of those who were given a ticket for a PUP law violation, 35 (39%) reported not smoking during year 1. Students in grade 7 were more likely to have quit smoking (84%) than those in grade 8 (35%), grade 9 (32%), or grade 10 (21%). For the two follow-up years, 45% and 41% reported not smoking. Assuming those who attrited were smokers, it is possible that about 15% to 24% of the original sample of children cited actually quit smoking over the follow-up period. The implications of these findings are discussed.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Adolescent Behavior

Law Enforcement

Minors

Keywords
Journal Title journal of drug education
Publication Year Start
%A Jason, Leonard A.; Pokorny, Steven B.; Adams, Monica; Hunt, Yvonne; Gadiraju, Praveena; Schoeny, Michael
%T Do fines for violating possession-use-purchase laws reduce youth tobacco use?
%J Journal of drug education, vol. 37, no. 4, pp. 393-400
%D 00/2007
%V 37
%N 4
%M eng
%B The present brief report followed children exposed to consequences for violating Purchase, Use, and Possession (PUP) laws over time to assess changes in their smoking status. Youth in 24 towns were surveyed once a year for 3 years, and rates of tobacco use for those fined for PUP law violations were assessed. Of those who were given a ticket for a PUP law violation, 35 (39%) reported not smoking during year 1. Students in grade 7 were more likely to have quit smoking (84%) than those in grade 8 (35%), grade 9 (32%), or grade 10 (21%). For the two follow-up years, 45% and 41% reported not smoking. Assuming those who attrited were smokers, it is possible that about 15% to 24% of the original sample of children cited actually quit smoking over the follow-up period. The implications of these findings are discussed.
%K Adolescent, Adolescent Behavior, Age Factors, Female, Humans, Law Enforcement, Male, Minors, Smoking, Smoking Cessation
%P 393
%L 400
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2007.......37..393J

@Article{Jason2007,
author="Jason, Leonard A.
and Pokorny, Steven B.
and Adams, Monica
and Hunt, Yvonne
and Gadiraju, Praveena
and Schoeny, Michael",
title="Do fines for violating possession-use-purchase laws reduce youth tobacco use?",
journal="Journal of drug education",
year="2007",
volume="37",
number="4",
pages="393--400",
keywords="Adolescent",
keywords="Adolescent Behavior",
keywords="Age Factors",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Humans",
keywords="Law Enforcement",
keywords="Male",
keywords="Minors",
keywords="Smoking",
keywords="Smoking Cessation",
abstract="The present brief report followed children exposed to consequences for violating Purchase, Use, and Possession (PUP) laws over time to assess changes in their smoking status. Youth in 24 towns were surveyed once a year for 3 years, and rates of tobacco use for those fined for PUP law violations were assessed. Of those who were given a ticket for a PUP law violation, 35 (39\%) reported not smoking during year 1. Students in grade 7 were more likely to have quit smoking (84\%) than those in grade 8 (35\%), grade 9 (32\%), or grade 10 (21\%). For the two follow-up years, 45\% and 41\% reported not smoking. Assuming those who attrited were smokers, it is possible that about 15\% to 24\% of the original sample of children cited actually quit smoking over the follow-up period. The implications of these findings are discussed.",
issn="0047-2379",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18351178",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Do fines for violating possession-use-purchase laws reduce youth tobacco use?
%A Jason, Leonard A.
%A Pokorny, Steven B.
%A Adams, Monica
%A Hunt, Yvonne
%A Gadiraju, Praveena
%A Schoeny, Michael
%J Journal of drug education
%D 2007
%V 37
%N 4
%@ 0047-2379
%G eng
%F Jason2007
%X The present brief report followed children exposed to consequences for violating Purchase, Use, and Possession (PUP) laws over time to assess changes in their smoking status. Youth in 24 towns were surveyed once a year for 3 years, and rates of tobacco use for those fined for PUP law violations were assessed. Of those who were given a ticket for a PUP law violation, 35 (39%) reported not smoking during year 1. Students in grade 7 were more likely to have quit smoking (84%) than those in grade 8 (35%), grade 9 (32%), or grade 10 (21%). For the two follow-up years, 45% and 41% reported not smoking. Assuming those who attrited were smokers, it is possible that about 15% to 24% of the original sample of children cited actually quit smoking over the follow-up period. The implications of these findings are discussed.
%K Adolescent
%K Adolescent Behavior
%K Age Factors
%K Female
%K Humans
%K Law Enforcement
%K Male
%K Minors
%K Smoking
%K Smoking Cessation
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18351178
%P 393-400

PT Journal
AU Jason, LA
   Pokorny, SB
   Adams, M
   Hunt, Y
   Gadiraju, P
   Schoeny, M
TI Do fines for violating possession-use-purchase laws reduce youth tobacco use?
SO Journal of drug education
JI J Drug Educ
PY 2007
BP 393
EP 400
VL 37
IS 4
LA eng
DE Adolescent; Adolescent Behavior; Age Factors; Female; Humans; Law Enforcement; Male; Minors; Smoking; Smoking Cessation
AB The present brief report followed children exposed to consequences for violating Purchase, Use, and Possession (PUP) laws over time to assess changes in their smoking status. Youth in 24 towns were surveyed once a year for 3 years, and rates of tobacco use for those fined for PUP law violations were assessed. Of those who were given a ticket for a PUP law violation, 35 (39%) reported not smoking during year 1. Students in grade 7 were more likely to have quit smoking (84%) than those in grade 8 (35%), grade 9 (32%), or grade 10 (21%). For the two follow-up years, 45% and 41% reported not smoking. Assuming those who attrited were smokers, it is possible that about 15% to 24% of the original sample of children cited actually quit smoking over the follow-up period. The implications of these findings are discussed.
ER

PMID- 18351178
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20080320
DCOM- 20080408
IS  - 0047-2379 (Print)
IS  - 0047-2379 (Linking)
VI  - 37
IP  - 4
DP  - 2007
TI  - Do fines for violating possession-use-purchase laws reduce youth tobacco use?
PG  - 393-400
AB  - The present brief report followed children exposed to consequences for violating 
      Purchase, Use, and Possession (PUP) laws over time to assess changes in their
      smoking status. Youth in 24 towns were surveyed once a year for 3 years, and
      rates of tobacco use for those fined for PUP law violations were assessed. Of
      those who were given a ticket for a PUP law violation, 35 (39%) reported not
      smoking during year 1. Students in grade 7 were more likely to have quit smoking 
      (84%) than those in grade 8 (35%), grade 9 (32%), or grade 10 (21%). For the two 
      follow-up years, 45% and 41% reported not smoking. Assuming those who attrited
      were smokers, it is possible that about 15% to 24% of the original sample of
      children cited actually quit smoking over the follow-up period. The implications 
      of these findings are discussed.
FAU - Jason, Leonard A
AU  - Jason LA
AD  - DePaul University, Illinois, USA. [email protected]
FAU - Pokorny, Steven B
AU  - Pokorny SB
FAU - Adams, Monica
AU  - Adams M
FAU - Hunt, Yvonne
AU  - Hunt Y
FAU - Gadiraju, Praveena
AU  - Gadiraju P
FAU - Schoeny, Michael
AU  - Schoeny M
LA  - eng
GR  - CA80288/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PL  - United States
TA  - J Drug Educ
JT  - Journal of drug education
JID - 1300031
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - *Adolescent Behavior
MH  - Age Factors
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - *Law Enforcement
MH  - Male
MH  - *Minors
MH  - Smoking/*epidemiology/*legislation & jurisprudence
MH  - Smoking Cessation
EDAT- 2008/03/21 09:00
MHDA- 2008/04/09 09:00
CRDT- 2008/03/21 09:00
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Drug Educ. 2007;37(4):393-400.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Jason, Leonard A.
AU  - Pokorny, Steven B.
AU  - Adams, Monica
AU  - Hunt, Yvonne
AU  - Gadiraju, Praveena
AU  - Schoeny, Michael
PY  - 2007//
TI  - Do fines for violating possession-use-purchase laws reduce youth tobacco use?
T2  - J Drug Educ
JO  - Journal of drug education
SP  - 393
EP  - 400
VL  - 37
IS  - 4
KW  - Adolescent
KW  - Adolescent Behavior
KW  - Age Factors
KW  - Female
KW  - Humans
KW  - Law Enforcement
KW  - Male
KW  - Minors
KW  - Smoking
KW  - Smoking Cessation
N2  - The present brief report followed children exposed to consequences for violating Purchase, Use, and Possession (PUP) laws over time to assess changes in their smoking status. Youth in 24 towns were surveyed once a year for 3 years, and rates of tobacco use for those fined for PUP law violations were assessed. Of those who were given a ticket for a PUP law violation, 35 (39%) reported not smoking during year 1. Students in grade 7 were more likely to have quit smoking (84%) than those in grade 8 (35%), grade 9 (32%), or grade 10 (21%). For the two follow-up years, 45% and 41% reported not smoking. Assuming those who attrited were smokers, it is possible that about 15% to 24% of the original sample of children cited actually quit smoking over the follow-up period. The implications of these findings are discussed.
SN  - 0047-2379
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18351178
ID  - Jason2007
ER  - 
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