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Hypoxic ventilatory responses in rats after hypercapnic hyperoxia and intermittent hyperoxia.

Abstract Perinatal hyperoxia attenuates the adult hypoxic ventilatory response in rats. Hyperoxia might elicit this plasticity by inhibiting chemoreceptor activity during early life. Thus, we hypothesized that stimulating chemoreceptors with CO(2) during hyperoxia or interrupting hyperoxia with periods of normoxia would reduce the effects of hyperoxia on the hypoxic ventilatory response. Rats were born and raised in 60% O(2) for the first two postnatal weeks. Two groups were simultaneously exposed to either sustained hypercapnia (5% CO(2)) or intermittent hypercapnia (alternating 1-h exposures to 0 and 7.5% CO(2)) while another group was exposed to only intermittent hyperoxia (alternating 1-h exposures to 21 and 60% O(2)). Hypoxic ventilatory responses were assessed at 6-10 weeks of age by whole-body plethysmography. Rats exposed to intermittent hypercapnia during hyperoxia or to intermittent hyperoxia exhibited greater increases in ventilation-to-metabolism ratio ( VE/VO2 ) in response to 12.5% O(2) than rats exposed to hyperoxia alone (both P<0.05), although responses were generally less than those of normoxia-reared controls; a similar trend was observed for rats exposed to sustained hypercapnia during hyperoxia (P=0.053). These data suggest that activity-dependent mechanisms contribute to hyperoxia-induced developmental plasticity, although contributions from additional mechanisms cannot be excluded.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title respiratory physiology & neurobiology
Publication Year Start
%A Bavis, Ryan W.; Russell, Kate E. R.; Simons, Julia C.; Otis, Jessica P.
%T Hypoxic ventilatory responses in rats after hypercapnic hyperoxia and intermittent hyperoxia.
%J Respiratory physiology & neurobiology, vol. 155, no. 3, pp. 193-202
%D 03/2007
%V 155
%N 3
%M eng
%B Perinatal hyperoxia attenuates the adult hypoxic ventilatory response in rats. Hyperoxia might elicit this plasticity by inhibiting chemoreceptor activity during early life. Thus, we hypothesized that stimulating chemoreceptors with CO(2) during hyperoxia or interrupting hyperoxia with periods of normoxia would reduce the effects of hyperoxia on the hypoxic ventilatory response. Rats were born and raised in 60% O(2) for the first two postnatal weeks. Two groups were simultaneously exposed to either sustained hypercapnia (5% CO(2)) or intermittent hypercapnia (alternating 1-h exposures to 0 and 7.5% CO(2)) while another group was exposed to only intermittent hyperoxia (alternating 1-h exposures to 21 and 60% O(2)). Hypoxic ventilatory responses were assessed at 6-10 weeks of age by whole-body plethysmography. Rats exposed to intermittent hypercapnia during hyperoxia or to intermittent hyperoxia exhibited greater increases in ventilation-to-metabolism ratio ( VE/VO2 ) in response to 12.5% O(2) than rats exposed to hyperoxia alone (both P<0.05), although responses were generally less than those of normoxia-reared controls; a similar trend was observed for rats exposed to sustained hypercapnia during hyperoxia (P=0.053). These data suggest that activity-dependent mechanisms contribute to hyperoxia-induced developmental plasticity, although contributions from additional mechanisms cannot be excluded.
%K Animals, Anoxia, Blood Gas Analysis, Carbon Dioxide, Carotid Body, Female, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Hypercapnia, Hyperoxia, Male, Oxygen Consumption, Plethysmography, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Reactive Oxygen Species, Respiratory Mechanics, Stimulation, Chemical
%P 193
%L 202
%Y 10.1016/j.resp.2006.06.006
%W PHY
%G AUTHOR
%R 2007......155..193B

@Article{Bavis2007,
author="Bavis, Ryan W.
and Russell, Kate E. R.
and Simons, Julia C.
and Otis, Jessica P.",
title="Hypoxic ventilatory responses in rats after hypercapnic hyperoxia and intermittent hyperoxia.",
journal="Respiratory physiology \& neurobiology",
year="2007",
month="Mar",
day="15",
volume="155",
number="3",
pages="193--202",
keywords="Animals",
keywords="Anoxia",
keywords="Blood Gas Analysis",
keywords="Carbon Dioxide",
keywords="Carotid Body",
keywords="Female",
keywords="Hydrogen-Ion Concentration",
keywords="Hypercapnia",
keywords="Hyperoxia",
keywords="Male",
keywords="Oxygen Consumption",
keywords="Plethysmography",
keywords="Rats",
keywords="Rats, Sprague-Dawley",
keywords="Reactive Oxygen Species",
keywords="Respiratory Mechanics",
keywords="Stimulation, Chemical",
abstract="Perinatal hyperoxia attenuates the adult hypoxic ventilatory response in rats. Hyperoxia might elicit this plasticity by inhibiting chemoreceptor activity during early life. Thus, we hypothesized that stimulating chemoreceptors with CO(2) during hyperoxia or interrupting hyperoxia with periods of normoxia would reduce the effects of hyperoxia on the hypoxic ventilatory response. Rats were born and raised in 60\% O(2) for the first two postnatal weeks. Two groups were simultaneously exposed to either sustained hypercapnia (5\% CO(2)) or intermittent hypercapnia (alternating 1-h exposures to 0 and 7.5\% CO(2)) while another group was exposed to only intermittent hyperoxia (alternating 1-h exposures to 21 and 60\% O(2)). Hypoxic ventilatory responses were assessed at 6-10 weeks of age by whole-body plethysmography. Rats exposed to intermittent hypercapnia during hyperoxia or to intermittent hyperoxia exhibited greater increases in ventilation-to-metabolism ratio ( VE/VO2 ) in response to 12.5\% O(2) than rats exposed to hyperoxia alone (both P<0.05), although responses were generally less than those of normoxia-reared controls; a similar trend was observed for rats exposed to sustained hypercapnia during hyperoxia (P=0.053). These data suggest that activity-dependent mechanisms contribute to hyperoxia-induced developmental plasticity, although contributions from additional mechanisms cannot be excluded.",
issn="1569-9048",
doi="10.1016/j.resp.2006.06.006",
url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16880011",
language="eng"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Hypoxic ventilatory responses in rats after hypercapnic hyperoxia and intermittent hyperoxia.
%A Bavis, Ryan W.
%A Russell, Kate E. R.
%A Simons, Julia C.
%A Otis, Jessica P.
%J Respiratory physiology & neurobiology
%D 2007
%8 Mar 15
%V 155
%N 3
%@ 1569-9048
%G eng
%F Bavis2007
%X Perinatal hyperoxia attenuates the adult hypoxic ventilatory response in rats. Hyperoxia might elicit this plasticity by inhibiting chemoreceptor activity during early life. Thus, we hypothesized that stimulating chemoreceptors with CO(2) during hyperoxia or interrupting hyperoxia with periods of normoxia would reduce the effects of hyperoxia on the hypoxic ventilatory response. Rats were born and raised in 60% O(2) for the first two postnatal weeks. Two groups were simultaneously exposed to either sustained hypercapnia (5% CO(2)) or intermittent hypercapnia (alternating 1-h exposures to 0 and 7.5% CO(2)) while another group was exposed to only intermittent hyperoxia (alternating 1-h exposures to 21 and 60% O(2)). Hypoxic ventilatory responses were assessed at 6-10 weeks of age by whole-body plethysmography. Rats exposed to intermittent hypercapnia during hyperoxia or to intermittent hyperoxia exhibited greater increases in ventilation-to-metabolism ratio ( VE/VO2 ) in response to 12.5% O(2) than rats exposed to hyperoxia alone (both P<0.05), although responses were generally less than those of normoxia-reared controls; a similar trend was observed for rats exposed to sustained hypercapnia during hyperoxia (P=0.053). These data suggest that activity-dependent mechanisms contribute to hyperoxia-induced developmental plasticity, although contributions from additional mechanisms cannot be excluded.
%K Animals
%K Anoxia
%K Blood Gas Analysis
%K Carbon Dioxide
%K Carotid Body
%K Female
%K Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
%K Hypercapnia
%K Hyperoxia
%K Male
%K Oxygen Consumption
%K Plethysmography
%K Rats
%K Rats, Sprague-Dawley
%K Reactive Oxygen Species
%K Respiratory Mechanics
%K Stimulation, Chemical
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resp.2006.06.006
%U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16880011
%P 193-202

PT Journal
AU Bavis, RW
   Russell, KER
   Simons, JC
   Otis, JP
TI Hypoxic ventilatory responses in rats after hypercapnic hyperoxia and intermittent hyperoxia.
SO Respiratory physiology & neurobiology
JI Respir Physiol Neurobiol
PD Mar
PY 2007
BP 193
EP 202
VL 155
IS 3
DI 10.1016/j.resp.2006.06.006
LA eng
DE Animals; Anoxia; Blood Gas Analysis; Carbon Dioxide; Carotid Body; Female; Hydrogen-Ion Concentration; Hypercapnia; Hyperoxia; Male; Oxygen Consumption; Plethysmography; Rats; Rats, Sprague-Dawley; Reactive Oxygen Species; Respiratory Mechanics; Stimulation, Chemical
AB Perinatal hyperoxia attenuates the adult hypoxic ventilatory response in rats. Hyperoxia might elicit this plasticity by inhibiting chemoreceptor activity during early life. Thus, we hypothesized that stimulating chemoreceptors with CO(2) during hyperoxia or interrupting hyperoxia with periods of normoxia would reduce the effects of hyperoxia on the hypoxic ventilatory response. Rats were born and raised in 60% O(2) for the first two postnatal weeks. Two groups were simultaneously exposed to either sustained hypercapnia (5% CO(2)) or intermittent hypercapnia (alternating 1-h exposures to 0 and 7.5% CO(2)) while another group was exposed to only intermittent hyperoxia (alternating 1-h exposures to 21 and 60% O(2)). Hypoxic ventilatory responses were assessed at 6-10 weeks of age by whole-body plethysmography. Rats exposed to intermittent hypercapnia during hyperoxia or to intermittent hyperoxia exhibited greater increases in ventilation-to-metabolism ratio ( VE/VO2 ) in response to 12.5% O(2) than rats exposed to hyperoxia alone (both P<0.05), although responses were generally less than those of normoxia-reared controls; a similar trend was observed for rats exposed to sustained hypercapnia during hyperoxia (P=0.053). These data suggest that activity-dependent mechanisms contribute to hyperoxia-induced developmental plasticity, although contributions from additional mechanisms cannot be excluded.
ER

PMID- 16880011
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20070205
DCOM- 20070416
LR  - 20131121
IS  - 1569-9048 (Print)
IS  - 1569-9048 (Linking)
VI  - 155
IP  - 3
DP  - 2007 Mar 15
TI  - Hypoxic ventilatory responses in rats after hypercapnic hyperoxia and
      intermittent hyperoxia.
PG  - 193-202
AB  - Perinatal hyperoxia attenuates the adult hypoxic ventilatory response in rats.
      Hyperoxia might elicit this plasticity by inhibiting chemoreceptor activity
      during early life. Thus, we hypothesized that stimulating chemoreceptors with
      CO(2) during hyperoxia or interrupting hyperoxia with periods of normoxia would
      reduce the effects of hyperoxia on the hypoxic ventilatory response. Rats were
      born and raised in 60% O(2) for the first two postnatal weeks. Two groups were
      simultaneously exposed to either sustained hypercapnia (5% CO(2)) or intermittent
      hypercapnia (alternating 1-h exposures to 0 and 7.5% CO(2)) while another group
      was exposed to only intermittent hyperoxia (alternating 1-h exposures to 21 and
      60% O(2)). Hypoxic ventilatory responses were assessed at 6-10 weeks of age by
      whole-body plethysmography. Rats exposed to intermittent hypercapnia during
      hyperoxia or to intermittent hyperoxia exhibited greater increases in
      ventilation-to-metabolism ratio ( VE/VO2 ) in response to 12.5% O(2) than rats
      exposed to hyperoxia alone (both P&lt;0.05), although responses were generally less 
      than those of normoxia-reared controls; a similar trend was observed for rats
      exposed to sustained hypercapnia during hyperoxia (P=0.053). These data suggest
      that activity-dependent mechanisms contribute to hyperoxia-induced developmental 
      plasticity, although contributions from additional mechanisms cannot be excluded.
FAU - Bavis, Ryan W
AU  - Bavis RW
AD  - Department of Biology, Bates College, 44 Campus Ave., Carnegie Science Hall,
      Lewiston, ME 04240, USA. [email protected] &lt;[email protected]&gt;
FAU - Russell, Kate E R
AU  - Russell KE
FAU - Simons, Julia C
AU  - Simons JC
FAU - Otis, Jessica P
AU  - Otis JP
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20060623
PL  - Netherlands
TA  - Respir Physiol Neurobiol
JT  - Respiratory physiology &amp; neurobiology
JID - 101140022
RN  - 0 (Reactive Oxygen Species)
RN  - 142M471B3J (Carbon Dioxide)
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - Anoxia/*physiopathology
MH  - Blood Gas Analysis
MH  - Carbon Dioxide/metabolism/pharmacology
MH  - Carotid Body/physiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
MH  - Hypercapnia/*physiopathology
MH  - Hyperoxia/*physiopathology
MH  - Male
MH  - Oxygen Consumption/physiology
MH  - Plethysmography
MH  - Rats
MH  - Rats, Sprague-Dawley
MH  - Reactive Oxygen Species/pharmacology
MH  - Respiratory Mechanics/*physiology
MH  - Stimulation, Chemical
EDAT- 2006/08/02 09:00
MHDA- 2007/04/17 09:00
CRDT- 2006/08/02 09:00
PHST- 2006/02/24 [received]
PHST- 2006/06/19 [revised]
PHST- 2006/06/20 [accepted]
PHST- 2006/06/23 [aheadofprint]
AID - S1569-9048(06)00188-1 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.resp.2006.06.006 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Respir Physiol Neurobiol. 2007 Mar 15;155(3):193-202. Epub 2006 Jun 23.
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Bavis, Ryan W.
AU  - Russell, Kate E. R.
AU  - Simons, Julia C.
AU  - Otis, Jessica P.
PY  - 2007/Mar/15
TI  - Hypoxic ventilatory responses in rats after hypercapnic hyperoxia and intermittent hyperoxia.
T2  - Respir Physiol Neurobiol
JO  - Respiratory physiology & neurobiology
SP  - 193
EP  - 202
VL  - 155
IS  - 3
KW  - Animals
KW  - Anoxia
KW  - Blood Gas Analysis
KW  - Carbon Dioxide
KW  - Carotid Body
KW  - Female
KW  - Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
KW  - Hypercapnia
KW  - Hyperoxia
KW  - Male
KW  - Oxygen Consumption
KW  - Plethysmography
KW  - Rats
KW  - Rats, Sprague-Dawley
KW  - Reactive Oxygen Species
KW  - Respiratory Mechanics
KW  - Stimulation, Chemical
N2  - Perinatal hyperoxia attenuates the adult hypoxic ventilatory response in rats. Hyperoxia might elicit this plasticity by inhibiting chemoreceptor activity during early life. Thus, we hypothesized that stimulating chemoreceptors with CO(2) during hyperoxia or interrupting hyperoxia with periods of normoxia would reduce the effects of hyperoxia on the hypoxic ventilatory response. Rats were born and raised in 60% O(2) for the first two postnatal weeks. Two groups were simultaneously exposed to either sustained hypercapnia (5% CO(2)) or intermittent hypercapnia (alternating 1-h exposures to 0 and 7.5% CO(2)) while another group was exposed to only intermittent hyperoxia (alternating 1-h exposures to 21 and 60% O(2)). Hypoxic ventilatory responses were assessed at 6-10 weeks of age by whole-body plethysmography. Rats exposed to intermittent hypercapnia during hyperoxia or to intermittent hyperoxia exhibited greater increases in ventilation-to-metabolism ratio ( VE/VO2 ) in response to 12.5% O(2) than rats exposed to hyperoxia alone (both P<0.05), although responses were generally less than those of normoxia-reared controls; a similar trend was observed for rats exposed to sustained hypercapnia during hyperoxia (P=0.053). These data suggest that activity-dependent mechanisms contribute to hyperoxia-induced developmental plasticity, although contributions from additional mechanisms cannot be excluded.
SN  - 1569-9048
UR  - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resp.2006.06.006
UR  - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16880011
ID  - Bavis2007
ER  - 
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