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Practice Guidelines as Topic - Top 30 Publications

Project Public Health Ready: History and Evolution of a Best Practice for Public Health Preparedness Planning.

We review the history and evolution of Project Public Health Ready and demonstrate why it is considered a best practice in public health preparedness planning. Previous articles on this program have described its impact on single health departments. We provide background information, review successes and challenges to date, and inform public health practitioners about a vetted tool for local public health planners to develop capacity and capability in all-hazards planning and response.

Individualizing immunization for international travelers.

Take into account routine childhood vaccinations, those that are mandatory for specific destinations, and these highly recommended immunizations.

Latest recommendations for the 2017-2018 flu season.

This season's vaccine has a new H1N1 component and any vaccine, except the live attenuated virus formulation, is suitable for pregnant women.

Autonomic dysfunction: A guide for FPs.

Impotence, bladder dysfunction, GI symptoms, and orthostatic hypotension can signal autonomic dysfunction. Here's what you'll see and how to respond.

Toward Meaningful Care Plan Clinical Decision Support: Feasibility and Effects of a Simulated Pilot Study.

Clinical decision support (CDS) tools-with easily understood and actionable information, at the point of care-are needed to help registered nurses (RNs) make evidence-based decisions. Not clear are the optimal formats of CDS tools. Thorough, preclinical testing is desirable to avoid costly errors associated with premature implementation in electronic health records.

Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of three current guidelines for the evaluation of asymptomatic pancreatic cystic neoplasms.

Asymptomatic pancreatic cysts are a common clinical problem but only a minority of these cases progress to cancer. Our aim was to compare the accuracy to detect malignancy of the 2015 American Gastroenterological Association (AGA), the 2012 International Consensus/Fukuoka (Fukuoka guidelines [FG]), and the 2010 American College of Radiology (ACR) guidelines.We conducted a retrospective study at 3 referral centers for all patients who underwent resection for an asymptomatic pancreatic cyst between January 2008 and December 2013. We compared the accuracy of 3 guidelines in predicting high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or cancer in resected cysts. We performed logistic regression analyses to examine the association between cyst features and risk of HGD or cancer.A total of 269 patients met inclusion criteria. A total of 228 (84.8%) had a benign diagnosis or low-grade dysplasia on surgical pathology, and 41 patients (15.2%) had either HGD (n = 14) or invasive cancer (n = 27). Of the 41 patients with HGD or cancer on resection, only 3 patients would have met the AGA guideline's indications for resection based on the preoperative cyst characteristics, whereas 30/41 patients would have met the FG criteria for resection and 22/41 patients met the ACR criteria. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value of HGD, and/or cancer of the AGA guidelines were 7.3%, 88.2%, 10%, and 84.1%, compared to 73.2%, 45.6%, 19.5%, and 90.4% for the FG and 53.7%, 61%, 19.8%, and 88% for the ACR guidelines. In multivariable analysis, cyst size >3 cm, compared to ≤3 cm, (odds ratio [OR] = 2.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11, 4.2) and each year increase in age (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.11) were positively associated with risk of HGD or cancer on resection.In patients with asymptomatic branch duct-intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms or mucinous cystic neoplasms who underwent resection, the prevalence rate of HGD or cancer was 15.2%. Using the 2015 AGA criteria for resection would have missed 92.6% of patients with HGD or cancer. The more "inclusive" FG and ACR had a higher sensitivity for HGD or cancer but lower specificity. Given the current deficiencies of these guidelines, it will be important to determine the acceptable rate of false-positives in order to prevent a single true-positive.

Mammographic Screening at Age 40 or 45? What Difference Does It Make? The Potential Impact of American Cancer Society Mammography Screening Guidelines.

this is a 10-year retrospective chart review evaluating the potential impact of the most recent American Cancer Society mammography screening guidelines which excludes female patients aged 40 to 44 years from routine annual screening mammography. Instead they recommend screening mammography starting at age 45 with the option to begin screening earlier if the patient desires. The institutional cancer registry was systematically searched to identify all women aged 40 to 44 years treated for breast cancer over a 10-year period. These women were separated into two cohorts: screening mammography detected cancer (SMDC) and nonscreening mammography detected cancer (NSMDC). Statistical analysis of the cohorts was performed for lymph node status (SLN), five-year disease-free survival, and five-year overall survival. Women with SMDC had a significantly lower incidence of SLN positive cancer than the NSMDC group, 9 of 63 (14.3%) versus 36 of 81 (44 %; P < 0.001). The five-year disease-free survival for both groups was 84 per cent for SMDC and 80 per cent for NSMDC; this was not statistically significant. The five-year overall survival was statistically significant at 94 per cent for the SMDC group and 80 per cent for the NSMDC group (P < 0.05). This review demonstrates the significance of mammographic screening for early detection and treatment of breast cancer. Mammographic screening in women aged 40 to 44 detected tumors with fewer nodal metastases, resulting in improved survival and reaffirming the need for annual mammographic screening in this age group.

Use of Global initiative for asthma (GINA) guidelines in asthma management among paediatric residents in a Sub Saharan African country: a cross-sectional descriptive study.

Clinical practice guidelines are systematically developed statements to assist practitioner and patient decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. Despite abundance of asthma guidelines, prevalence has continued to increase globally. There is need to assess how the contents of asthma guidelines are put to clinical use by doctors in the management of children with asthma. This study aims at evaluating the clinical practice of paediatric residents in applying GINA guidelines.

Consensus Guidelines for Implementing Pencil-Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Thoracic Malignancies on Behalf of the PTCOG Thoracic and Lymphoma Subcommittee.

Pencil-beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy (PT), particularly intensity modulated PT, represents the latest advanced PT technology for treating cancers, including thoracic malignancies. On the basis of virtual clinical studies, PBS-PT appears to have great potential in its ability to tightly tailor the dose to the target while sparing critical structures, thereby reducing treatment-related toxicities, particularly for tumors in areas with complicated anatomy. However, implementing PBS-PT for moving targets has several additional technical challenges compared with intensity modulated photon radiation therapy or passive scattering PT. Four-dimensional computed tomography-based motion management and robust optimization and evaluation are crucial for minimizing uncertainties associated with beam range and organ motion. Rigorous quality assurance is required to validate dose delivery both before and during the course of treatment. Active motion management (eg, breath hold), beam gating, rescanning, tracking, or adaptive planning may be needed for cases involving significant motion or changes in motion or anatomy over the course of treatment.

Dual Antiplatelet Therapy in the Perioperative Period - To Continue or Discontinue Treatment?

Background For secondary prevention of acute coronary syndrome, guidelines recommend dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with acetylsalicylic acid and a P2Y12 receptor antagonist such as clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor for a period of 12 months. Often, uncertainty exists with respect to surgical or diagnostic procedures in these high-risk patients: can the DAPT be continued without interruption? If not, what is the recommended withdrawal strategy? What should be considered for the perioperative management? Methods An interdisciplinary group of experienced experts in the fields of cardiology, cardiac surgery, gastroenterology, anaesthesiology, intensive care and haemostaseology developed recommendations relevant to daily clinical practice based on the current scientific evidence. Results These recommendations include instructions for evaluating the patient- and procedure-specific risks of bleeding and ischaemia, general recommendations regarding the DAPT withdrawal strategy, and specific guidance for frequent surgical or diagnostic procedures. Discussion This article aims to facilitate the management of patients with DAPT for all medical disciplines involved, thereby ensuring optimal care of patients during the perioperative period.

Recommendations for HIV Screening of Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men - United States, 2017.

CDC's 2006 recommendations for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing state that all persons aged 13-64 years should be screened for HIV at least once, and that persons at higher risk for HIV infection, including sexually active gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM), should be rescreened at least annually (1). Authors of reports published since 2006, including CDC (2), suggested that MSM, a group that is at highest risk for HIV infection, might benefit from being screened more frequently than once each year. In 2013, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) found insufficient evidence to specify an HIV rescreening interval but recommended annual screening for MSM as a reasonable approach (3). However, some HIV providers have begun to offer more frequent screening, such as once every 3 or 6 months, to some MSM. A CDC work group conducted a systematic literature review and held four expert consultations to review programmatic experience to determine whether there was sufficient evidence to change the 2006 CDC recommendation (i.e., at least annual HIV screening of MSM in clinical settings). The CDC work group concluded that the evidence remains insufficient to recommend screening more frequently than at least once each year. CDC continues to recommend that clinicians screen asymptomatic sexually active MSM at least annually. Each clinician can consider the benefits of offering more frequent screening (e.g., once every 3 or 6 months) to individual MSM at increased risk for acquiring HIV infection, weighing their patients' individual risk factors, local HIV epidemiology, and local testing policies.

Discordant American College of Physicians and international rheumatology guidelines for gout management: consensus statement of the Gout, Hyperuricemia and Crystal-Associated Disease Network (G-CAN).

In November 2016, the American College of Physicians (ACP) published a clinical practice guideline on the management of acute and recurrent gout. This guideline differs substantially from the latest guidelines generated by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and 3e (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative, despite reviewing largely the same body of evidence. The Gout, Hyperuricemia and Crystal-Associated Disease Network (G-CAN) convened an expert panel to review the methodology and conclusions of these four sets of guidelines and examine possible reasons for discordance between them. The G-CAN position, presented here, is that the fundamental pathophysiological knowledge underlying gout care, and evidence from clinical experience and clinical trials, supports a treat-to-target approach for gout aimed at lowering serum urate levels to below the saturation threshold at which monosodium urate crystals form. This practice, which is truly evidence-based and promotes the steady reduction in tissue urate crystal deposits, is promoted by the ACR, EULAR and 3e Initiative recommendations. By contrast, the ACP does not provide a clear recommendation for urate-lowering therapy (ULT) for patients with frequent, recurrent flares or those with tophi, nor does it recommend monitoring serum urate levels of patients prescribed ULT. Results from emerging clinical trials that have gout symptoms as the primary end point are expected to resolve this debate for all clinicians in the near term future.

Utility of BI-RADS Assessment Category 4 Subdivisions for Screening Breast MRI.

BI-RADS for mammography and ultrasound subdivides category 4 assessments by likelihood of malignancy into categories 4A (> 2% to ≤ 10%), 4B (> 10% to ≤ 50%), and 4C (> 50% to < 95%). Category 4 is not subdivided for breast MRI because of a paucity of data. The purpose of the present study is to determine the utility of categories 4A, 4B, and 4C for MRI by calculating their positive predictive values (PPVs) and comparing them with BI-RADS-specified rates of malignancy for mammography and ultrasound.

The Necessity and the Current Status of Safe Handling of Anticancer Drugs.

Number of people who handle anticancer drugs in their profession is increasing. Anticancer drugs, which are hazardous drugs(HD), exert cytocidal effects on cancer cells, but many have also been shown to have mutagenicity, teratogenicity and carcinogenicity; therefore, safe handling of anticancer drugs is necessary. In July 2015, the first Japanese guidelines for exposure control measures, namely, the "Joint Guidelines for Safe Handling of Cancer Chemotherapy Drugs", were published jointly by 3 societies. Our guideline is the creation of the Japanese Society of Cancer Nursing(JSCN), Japanese Society of Medical Oncology(JSMO)and Japanese Society of Pharmaceutical Oncology(JASPO)and has a historical significance. This paper states the necessity of safe handling of anticancer drugs, Japan's recent movement of safe handling, the introduction of joint guidelines of safe handling of anticancer drugs, and new movement of safe handling of USP chapter 800 in the United States.

Routine Preoperative Laboratory Tests for Elective Surgery.

CDC Screening Recommendation for Baby Boomers and Hepatitis C Virus Testing in the US Military Health System.

Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most common blood-borne infection in the United States, with an estimated 2.7 to 3.9 million cases as of 2014. In August 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended 1-time HCV testing of all baby boomers. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine the proportion of people screened for HCV in the US Department of Defense Military Health System before and after the CDC screening recommendation for baby boomers and (2) assess whether certain patient or system factors were associated with screening for HCV before and after August 2012.

Investigation of the status quo of massive blood transfusion in China and a synopsis of the proposed guidelines for massive blood transfusion.

The aim of this study was to provide an overview of massive transfusion in Chinese hospitals, identify the important indications for massive transfusion and corrective therapies based on clinical evidence and supporting experimental studies, and propose guidelines for the management of massive transfusion. This multiregion, multicenter retrospective study involved a Massive Blood Transfusion Coordination Group composed of 50 clinical experts specializing in blood transfusion, cardiac surgery, anesthesiology, obstetrics, general surgery, and medical statistics from 20 tertiary general hospitals across 5 regions in China. Data were collected for all patients who received ≥10 U red blood cell transfusion within 24 hours in the participating hospitals from January 1 2009 to December 31 2010, including patient demographics, pre-, peri-, and post-operative clinical characteristics, laboratory test results before, during, and after transfusion, and patient mortality at post-transfusion and discharge. We also designed an in vitro hemodilution model to investigate the changes of blood coagulation indices during massive transfusion and the correction of coagulopathy through supplement blood components under different hemodilutions. The experimental data in combination with the clinical evidence were used to determine the optimal proportion and timing for blood component supplementation during massive transfusion. Based on the findings from the present study, together with an extensive review of domestic and international transfusion-related literature and consensus feedback from the 50 experts, we drafted the guidelines on massive blood transfusion that will help Chinese hospitals to develop standardized protocols for massive blood transfusion.

A clinician's guide to ADHD treatment options.

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a prevalent neurodevelopmental condition of children and adolescents that often persists into adulthood. Primary care physicians are commonly the first to diagnosis ADHD and initiate a treatment plan with the patient. Guidelines recommend psychostimulant treatment as a first-line therapy in the management plan because it has a substantial impact on alleviating the core symptoms of ADHD. The recent development of a variety of methylphenidate and amphetamine formulations provides many options to meet individual patient lifestyle needs. Liquid, chewable, sprinkled capsule, wearable patch, and orally disintegrating tablet formulations are currently available for patients who may be noncompliant with or have difficulty swallowing traditional pills. This review provides a resource for physicians to identify the stimulant delivery formulation that best suits the patient. Formulations in development are also discussed.

Evaluation of severe malaria case management in Mazowe District, Zimbabwe, 2014.

Malaria is a preventable and curable disease. Mazowe district had been experiencing a lower malaria transmission rate in comparison to other districts in the Mashonaland Central province but it experienced a huge outbreak in the 2013-2014 rainy seasons with a case fatality rate (CFR) of 0.21%. This CFR was the highest in the province and it was twice as much as the national CFR (0.12%) for the same period. We evaluated severe malaria case management in Mazowe district to determine if practice is as per standard treatment guidelines.

Childhood tuberculosis: management and treatment outcomes among children in Northwest Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

Childhood tuberculosis (TB) treatment is becoming a major challenge in the TB control efforts of the Ethiopian health system. This study assessed childhood tuberculosis management, and treatment outcomes among children who completed anti-TB treatment in Northwest Ethiopia.

Italian national guidelines for the screening of gestational diabetes: Time for a critical appraisal?

In 2011, the Italian National Health System guidelines introduced a selective screening for gestational diabetes (GDM) based on risk factors, recommending early evaluation in high risk women. The present study examined to which extent guidelines are applied, and analyzed the effectiveness of GDM diagnosis according to risk profile.

Management of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Recipients: Care Beyond Guidelines.

This companion article is intended to address common clinical scenarios in patients with implantable defibrillators that were not addressed in the 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society implantable cardioverter defibrillator guidelines including recommendations for device programming to improve detection, to minimize shocks (appropriate and inappropriate), and to minimize ventricular pacing. Important issues at the time of replacement such as device prescription, technical aspects (vascular access, extraction), and management of components on advisories are also discussed. Finally, common clinical scenarios such as management of patients with terminal illnesses, recurrent ventricular tachycardia, electrical storms, catheter ablation for ventricular tachycardia, and system infection management are considered. The management of these patients requires a team approach and comprehensive knowledge surrounding these common clinical scenarios.

Contemporary Atrial Fibrillation Management: A Comparison of the Current AHA/ACC/HRS, CCS, and ESC Guidelines.

In this article we compare and contrast the current recommendations, and highlight the important differences, in the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Heart Rhythm Society, European Society of Cardiology, and Canadian Cardiovascular Society atrial fibrillation (AF) guidelines. Although many of the recommendations of the various societies are similar, there are important differences in the methodologies underlying their development and the specific content. Specifically, key differences can be observed in: (1) the definition of nonvalvular AF, which subsequently affects anticoagulation choices and candidacy for non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; (2) the symptom score used to guide management decisions and longitudinal patient profiling; (3) the stroke risk stratification algorithm used to determine indications for oral anticoagulant therapy; (4) the role of acetylsalicylic acid in stroke prevention in AF; (5) the antithrombotic regimens used in the context of coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, and percutaneous coronary intervention; (6) the rate control target and medications recommended to achieve the target; and (7) the role of "first-line" catheter ablation, open surgical ablation, and left atrial appendage exclusion.

Rationale, Design and Baseline Characteristics of Participants in the Cardiovascular Outcomes for People Using Anticoagulation Strategies (COMPASS) Trial.

Long-term aspirin prevents vascular events but is only modestly effective. Rivaroxaban alone or in combination with aspirin might be more effective than aspirin alone for vascular prevention in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) or peripheral artery disease (PAD). Rivaroxaban as well as aspirin increase upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and this might be prevented by proton pump inhibitor therapy.

Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women with Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States (Including U.S. Territories), July 2017.

CDC has updated the interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure in response to 1) declining prevalence of Zika virus disease in the World Health Organization's Region of the Americas (Americas) and 2) emerging evidence indicating prolonged detection of Zika virus immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies. Zika virus cases were first reported in the Americas during 2015-2016; however, the incidence of Zika virus disease has since declined. As the prevalence of Zika virus disease declines, the likelihood of false-positive test results increases. In addition, emerging epidemiologic and laboratory data indicate that, as is the case with other flaviviruses, Zika virus IgM antibodies can persist beyond 12 weeks after infection. Therefore, IgM test results cannot always reliably distinguish between an infection that occurred during the current pregnancy and one that occurred before the current pregnancy, particularly for women with possible Zika virus exposure before the current pregnancy. These limitations should be considered when counseling pregnant women about the risks and benefits of testing for Zika virus infection during pregnancy. This updated guidance emphasizes a shared decision-making model for testing and screening pregnant women, one in which patients and providers work together to make decisions about testing and care plans based on patient preferences and values, clinical judgment, and a balanced assessment of risks and expected outcomes.

New CDC Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection.

This updates the 1999 original, published before formal evidence-based guidelines were in routine use.

Treatment of Cholesterol in 2017.

Inconsistent Guideline Recommendations for Cardiovascular Prevention and the Debate About Zeroing in on and Zeroing LDL-C Levels With PCSK9 Inhibitors.

Summary of Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Clinical Practice Guideline on the Evaluation and Care of Living Kidney Donors.

Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) engaged an evidence review team and convened a work group to produce a guideline to evaluate and manage candidates for living kidney donation. The evidence for most guideline recommendations is sparse and many "ungraded" expert consensus recommendations were made to guide the donor candidate evaluation and care before, during, and after donation. The guideline advocates for replacing decisions based on assessments of single risk factors in isolation with a comprehensive approach to risk assessment using the best available evidence. The approach to simultaneous consideration of each candidate's profile of demographic and health characteristics advances a new framework for assessing donor candidate risk and for defensible shared decision making.

A Comparative Analysis of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Guideline Development Methodologies.

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) standards for guideline development have had unintended negative consequences. A more efficient approach is desirable.