PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Health Personnel - Top 30 Publications

Empathy and burnout of emergency professionals of a health region: A cross-sectional study.

The objective of this study is to assess the association between levels of empathy and burnout of emergency professionals in all the assistance levels.A cross-sectional observational study was conducted in the health region of Lleida and the Pyrenees with 100 professionals from the field of Urgency. Participation reached 40.8%. Empathy and burnout were measured using the Spanish versions of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE) and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) respectively. The total MBI score and its 3 dimensions (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment) were analyzed. The JSPE and MBI scores were categorized into tertiles that were identified as "low," "moderate," and "high" levels.The median (interquartile range) was 112 (102-123) and 37 (27-53.5) for the JSPE and MBI scores respectively. Professionals with high burnout (MBI≥47) showed the lowest levels of empathy, that is, JSPE score of 105 (98-114); those with moderate burnout (31≤MBI < 47) had a JSPE score of 114 (104.5-120.5); and those with low burnout (MBI < 31) had a JSPE score of 120.5 (105.8-127.2). In addition, the highest levels of empathy were associated with the lowest levels of burnout, especially in depersonalization, and to a lesser extent in personal accomplishment. There were no differences in empathy and burnout for any of the other study variables.Our findings suggest that the empathy of emergency professionals is associated with burnout. Hence, reducing professional burnout could help keep emergency professionals' empathy levels high, which in turn would ensure a better quality of care. Nevertheless, it would be necessary to carry out prospective studies to describe the profiles of burnout and empathy as well as their association and evolution.

Evaluation of the maternal mortality surveillance system in Mutare district, Zimbabwe, 2014-2015: a cross sectional study.

In Zimbabwe the integrated disease surveillance and response guidelines include maternal mortality as a notifiable event reported through the Maternal Mortality Surveillance System (MMSS). A preliminary review of the MMSS data for Mutare district for the period January to June 2014 revealed that there were some discrepancies in cases notified and those captured on the T5 monthly return form. There were also delays in reporting of some maternal deaths. Poor reporting indicated shortcomings in the MMSS in Mutare district and we therefore sought to assess the performance of the maternal mortality surveillance system in Mutare district.

Health worker attrition at a rural district hospital in Rwanda: a need for improved placement and retention strategies.

The shortage and maldistribution of health care workers in sub-Saharan Africa is a major concern for rural health facilities. Rural areas have 63% of sub-Saharan Africa population but only 37% of its doctors. Although attrition of health care workers is implicated in the human resources for health crisis in the rural settings, few studies report attrition rates and risk factors for attrition in rural district hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa.

Psychometric evaluation of the Caregiver Preparedness Scale in caregivers of adults with heart failure.

Well-prepared informal caregivers play an important role in heart failure (HF) care, so an instrument to evaluate their preparedness to care is important. To date, HF caregiver preparedness has been rarely investigated quantitatively. The Caregiver Preparedness Scale (CPS) has been used in other chronic condition populations, but its psychometric characteristics have never been tested in HF caregivers. The purpose of this study was to test the validity and reliability of the 8-item CPS in HF caregivers. In a convenience sample of 317 HF caregivers (72.4% female, mean age 54), we tested the CPS' factorial structure with confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and its concurrent validity with the Caregiver Contribution to Self-Care of HF Index (CC-SCHFI), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). We also tested CPS' reliability with composite reliability indicators, Cronbach's alpha, factor score determinacy coefficient, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The CFA for a one-factor model resulted in supportive fit indices (e.g., comparative fit index .97). Significant correlations (p < .05) of the CPS with both the CC-SCHFI and the HADS supported concurrent validity. The composite reliability index, Cronbach's alpha, factor score determinacy coefficient, and ICC were .89, .91, .96, .91, respectively, supporting reliability. Our study provides evidence that the CPS is a valid and reliable instrument to measure HF caregiver preparedness, enabling clinicians, and researchers to target specific interventions to HF caregivers.

A national survey of Chinese medicine doctors and clinical practice guidelines in China.

Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for Chinese medicine (CM) are being developed to assist doctors with appropriate decisions concerning CM care. To date, there has been little investigation on the perspectives of those to whom the guidelines are directed.

"We need people to collaborate together against this disease": A qualitative exploration of perceptions of dengue fever control in caregivers' of children under 5 years, in the Peruvian Amazon.

Dengue Fever presents a significant and growing burden of disease to endemic countries, where children are at particular risk. Worldwide, no effective anti-viral treatment has been identified, thus vector control is key for disease prevention, particularly in Peru where no vaccine is currently available. This qualitative study aimed to explore the perceptions of dengue control in caregivers' of children under 5 years in Peru, to help direct future mosquito control programmes and strategy.

Effect of Physician Notification Regarding Nonadherence to Colorectal Cancer Screening on Patient Participation in Fecal Immunochemical Test Cancer Screening: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

Increasing participation in fecal screening tests is a major challenge in countries that have implemented colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programs.

Comparison of Unsafe Driving Across Medical Conditions.

To compare risks of unsafe driving in patients with medical conditions.

The Effects of Implementing a Patient Acuity Tool on Nurse Satisfaction in a Pulmonary Medicine Unit.

In response to nurses' concerns of equity and satisfaction with patient assignments in a pulmonary medicine unit, a Patient Acuity Tool (PAT) was implemented. The impact of the PAT on nurse satisfaction and perceived equity of patient assignments was measured using a pre-/postsurvey design. Findings of the investigation indicate that a PAT supports nurse satisfaction and equity. In addition, qualitative data suggested that the PAT improved perceived professional autonomy and nurse-to-nurse communication.

The Case for Bringing the Licensed Practical Nurse Back to the Hospital.

The expansion of the aging population, residential care facilities, and projected registered nurse shortages pose significant challenges to nurse staffing ratios. The licensed practical/vocational nursing role is now being reexamined, as acute care and long-term care facilities look at staffing models and patient safety. There is now a demand for an increase in the numbers of practical nurse education programs, which have been overlooked as a pipeline for professional nursing. Recruiting and educating practical nurses open a pathway for greater diversity in the nursing profession as well as improving patient health outcomes.

Developing Professional Practice and Ethics Engagement: A Leadership Model.

Nurse leaders are responsible for a practice environment that fosters safe, quality patient outcomes through excellence in nursing practice. This article describes a reflective practice intervention in the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit of an urban academic medical center led by the unit nursing director and the hospital's nurse ethicist. The twice monthly case-based discussions, called "Nursing Practice and Ethics Rounds," were attended by staff and unit managers (nurse director, assistant nurse director, and clinical educator) and were facilitated by the nurse ethicist. The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study was to identify nurses' perceptions of the rounds on individual practice, unit practice, and the practice of their peers. Two focus groups were conducted with nurses who attended 3 or more sessions. Staff reported that they felt valued; experienced a decrease in moral distress; and improved empathy with patients, families, and other staff members after the intervention. They also reported better understanding of ethical issues and language to better talk about them. The presence of nurse leaders was valued as affirming the importance of practice development and of witnessing the experience of staff nurses. Finally, the process of reflection was valued for the opportunity it provided to process emotional and intellectual aspects of challenging cases.

Nurses to Their Nurse Leaders: We Need Your Help After a Failure to Rescue Patient Death.

The purpose of this study was to describe nurses' needs and how they are being met and not met after caring for surgical patients who died after a failure to rescue (FTR). A qualitative, phenomenologic approach was used for the interview and analysis framework. Methods to ensure rigor and trustworthiness were incorporated into the design. The investigator conducted semistructured 1:1 interviews with 14 nurses. Data were analyzed using Colaizzi's methods. Four themes were identified: (1) coping mechanisms are important; (2) immediate peer and supervisor feedback and support are needed for successful coping; (3) subsequent supervisor support is crucial to moving on; and (4) nurses desire both immediate support and subsequent follow-up from their nurse leaders after every FTR death. Nurses' needs after experiencing an FTR patient death across multiple practice areas and specialties were remarkably similar and clearly identified and articulated. Coping mechanisms vary and are not uniformly effective across different groups. Although most nurses in this study received support from their peers after the FTR event, many nurses did not receive the feedback and support that they needed from their nurse leaders. Immediate nurse leader support and follow-up debriefings should be mandatory after patient FTR deaths. Developing an understanding of nurses' needs after experiencing an FTR event can assist nurse leaders to better support nurses who experience FTR deaths. Insight into the environment surrounding FTR deaths also provides a foundation for future research aimed at improving patient safety and quality through an improved working environment for nurses.

On-boarding the Middle Manager.

The trend of promoting clinical experts into management roles continues. New middle managers need a transitional plan that includes support, mentoring, and direction from senior leaders, including the chief nursing officer (CNO). This case study demonstrates how the CNO of one organization collaborated with a faculty member colleague to develop and implement a yearlong personalized on-boarding program for a group of new nurse middle managers.

Effects of the Nurse Athlete Program on the Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors, Physical Health, and Mental Well-being of New Graduate Nurses.

Recognizing that transition from nursing student to point-of-care nurse can be a stressful time period in one's career. A pilot study at a large Midwestern medical center tested the preliminary effects of a health-oriented workshop, the Nurse Athlete, on new graduate nurses' healthy lifestyle beliefs, healthy lifestyle behaviors, depressive and anxiety symptoms, as well as health outcomes. The Nurse Athlete workshop, provided in partnership with Johnson & Johnson's Human Performance Institute (HPI), used materials from HPI's Corporate Athlete program. The 2-day workshop focuses on energy management through a comprehensive examination of goals and values in relation to one's spiritual, mental, emotional, and physical development and provides practical strategies to improve self-care. Eighty-eight new graduate nurses hired at the university's medical center were offered the opportunity to participate in the Nurse Athlete program and associated study. Sixty-nine percent of these new graduate nurses (n = 61) consented and participated in the program. There was a statistically significant decrease in the participants' weight and body mass index from baseline to the 6-month follow-up assessment, which resulted in small to medium positive effects for the Nurse Athlete program. There was also a significant decrease in body fat percentage across time, resulting in a large positive intervention effect. Statistically significant reductions in depressive symptoms were measured between baseline and 6 months.

A Rural "Grow Your Own" Strategy: Building Providers From the Local Workforce.

Rural health care leaders are increasingly tasked with the responsibility of providing health access to 21% of the national population with only 10% of the provider workforce. Provider recruitment strategies offering loan repayment have had some success in the short term but are less impactful at creating a long-term retention rate, unless the providers have an existing connection to either the community in which they are working or rural health care. Responding to these data, a demonstration project and study has been underway in Colorado to test a rural focused "grow your own" advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) model. Phase 1 is designed to measure recruitment of RNs from inside rural communities to return to school and become primary care providers within those communities. Phase 2 will measure completion of education and phase 3 will measure retention rates in those communities. This article reports on phase 1 of the project, which is recruitment. The project offers stipend support with assistance in the school application process, educational support, clinical and job placement assistance, and monthly coaching. In addition, communities were asked to provide matching funds to support the APRN students with a goal of creating a self-sustaining model that will build a continuous pipeline of APRN providers. This strategy avoids the costly need to recruit and relocate providers who have no ties to the community. Thirty-four of 36 nurses (94%) responded to the study survey. Survey results suggested that the combination of financial, community, and employer support utilized in this model could serve to create a new and sustainable strategy for building a rural APRN provider workforce pipeline. The ultimate outcome has the potential to ensure that all people in rural areas have access to a high-quality, well-educated primary care provider.

International Nursing: How Much Power Do Nurse Managers Have?

This study was conducted to explore issues of nurse managers' power and empowerment. Data were collected from nurse managers by way of a questionnaire consisting of background factors, work-related questions, and power-related questions at the unit and organization levels. The degree of empowerment was evaluated using 2 established instruments (CWEQ-II and Work Empowerment Questionnaire). The overall level of managers' personal power within their own units was relatively high. Nurse managers' perception of their power at an organizational level was found to be at a moderate level. Several factors related to an individual's professional background were correlated to power issues, both at the unit and organizational levels. Structural and psychological empowerment correlated with the overall level of power at a unit level and the overall level of power at an organizational level. Nurse managers self-reported their own general power at a unit level as high, which offers them possibilities to lead the development of nursing care in their units. Organizations may benefit more from nurse managers' leadership by more fully integrating them in the development processes of the entire organization.

Report From the Night Shift: How Administrative Supervisors Achieve Nurse and Patient Safety.

The administrative supervisor role (the nurse leader on the evening or night shift) has been present in hospitals for more than 100 years, but research is just commencing regarding how this leader achieves nurse and patient safety. This focused ethnographic study was conducted in 2 parts. The first part consisted of focus groups with night-shift staff nurses, held at 7 hospitals in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States, with the objective of obtaining the staff nurses' perception of the supervisors' role. The second part consisted of interviews with 30 administrative supervisors, recruited nationally from 20 different states, to explore the supervisors' perspective on practices used to enhance safety. The focus group and interview transcripts were thematically analyzed, using an iterative, comparative method to identify codes and sort for patterns. The findings reveal that administrative supervisors "make it (whatever needs to be done) work" and achieve nurse and patient safety by building trust with the staff, doing rounds, educating, and providing support to the front line team. These shift leaders foster a culture of safety with their relationship-oriented leadership style. By gaining further understanding about the administrative supervisor role, new workflow processes can be explored; specific continuing education programs can be developed; and additional research can be conducted.

An Integrative Review of 21st-Century Roles, Responsibilities, Characteristics, and Competencies of Chief Nurse Executives: A Blueprint for the Next Generation.

Executive nursing practice is experiencing "head-snapping change." Health care has transitioned from the managed care era to the disruptive innovation era. As chief nurse executives (CNEs) navigate evolving care delivery models, they must consider retooling their roles and responsibilities related to emergent models. This integrative review's purpose was to examine evidence for the roles, responsibilities, characteristics, and competencies of CNEs and system CNEs to better guide future generations of nurse executives. Ganong and Cooper's integrative review methodology was chosen to guide the evidence synthesis. Seventeen articles were identified that pertained to the clinical inquiry. The evidence is inconsistent for specific CNE roles, responsibilities, characteristics, and competencies due to many areas of overlap and an absence of definitions. The evidence does describe who CNEs are, what they do, and how they articulate executive practice. Embedding evidence regarding emerging roles, responsibilities, characteristics, and competencies into the personal journeys of nurse executives helps articulate shifting paradigms and the CNE's role in transforming health care. Review results have the potential to create a blueprint for the recruitment, development, and retention of the next generation of nurse executives. New knowledge for the ever-changing worlds of CNEs is needed by robust research studies and other evidence.

Effort-Reward Imbalance and Burnout Among ICU Nursing Staff: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Occupational stress is commonly observed among staff in intensive care units (ICUs). Sociodemographic, organizational, and job-related factors may lead to burnout among ICU health workers. In addition, these factors could modify the balance between efforts done and rewards perceived by workers; consequently, this imbalance could increase levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization and decrease a sense of personal accomplishment.

Toward Meaningful Care Plan Clinical Decision Support: Feasibility and Effects of a Simulated Pilot Study.

Clinical decision support (CDS) tools-with easily understood and actionable information, at the point of care-are needed to help registered nurses (RNs) make evidence-based decisions. Not clear are the optimal formats of CDS tools. Thorough, preclinical testing is desirable to avoid costly errors associated with premature implementation in electronic health records.

Critical incidents in the ED.

Enhancing staff support with debriefing programs.

Interprofessional Education - A Foundation for a New Approach to Health Care.

Physician Burnout.

Stakeholders' Perspectives on Strategies for the Recruitment and Retention of Primary Health Care Employees in Qatar: A Qualitative Approach.

This study explores the recruitment and retention conditions influencing primary health care (PHC) human resources for health (HRH) in Qatar and suggests strategies for their improvement. A qualitative design employing semistructured key informant interviews with PHC stakeholders in Qatar was utilized. Key interviewees were originally recognized, and snowball sampling was used to identify additional interviewees until reaching saturation point. Interview scripts were transcribed and then analyzed thematically using the Nvivo software package. Thematic analysis precipitated a number of themes. Under recruitment, the centrality of enhancing collaboration with academic institutions, enhancing extrinsic benefits, and strengthening human resources recruitment and management practices. Dedicated support needs to be provided to expatriate HRH especially in regard to housing services, children schooling, and streamlining administrative processes for relocation. Findings revealed that job security, continuous professional development, objective performance appraisal systems, enhanced job transparency, and remuneration are key retention concerns. The study provides a number of recommendations for the proper recruitment and retention of HRH. Health planners and decision makers must take these recommendations into consideration to ensure the presence of a competent and sustainable HRH in the PHC sector in the future.

Community pharmacists' knowledge, practices and beliefs about complementary and alternative medicine in Palestine: a cross-sectional study.

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization is dramatically increasing among patients. As community pharmacies are a major provider of CAM products, community pharmacists need to have the sufficient knowledge and information to advice their patients, answer their inquiries and to be proactive in the healthcare process to ensure optimal therapy outputs and minimize both drug-drug and drug-herb interactions. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to assess the knowledge, beliefs, and practices of community pharmacists in Palestine about CAM.

Nurses' Burnout: The Influence of Leader Empowering Behaviors, Work Conditions, and Demographic Traits.

Nurse burnout is a widespread phenomenon characterized by a reduction in nurses' energy that manifests in emotional exhaustion, lack of motivation, and feelings of frustration and may lead to reductions in work efficacy. This study was conducted to assess the level of burnout among Jordanian nurses and to investigate the influence of leader empowering behaviors (LEBs) on nurses' feelings of burnout in an endeavor to improve nursing work outcomes. A cross-sectional and correlational design was used. Leader Empowering Behaviors Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) were employed to collect data from 407 registered nurses, recruited from 11 hospitals in Jordan. The Jordanian nurses exhibited high levels of burnout as demonstrated by their high scores for Emotional Exhaustion (EE) and Depersonalization (DP) and moderate scores for Personal Accomplishment (PA). Factors related to work conditions, nurses' demographic traits, and LEBs were significantly correlated with the burnout categories. A stepwise regression model-exposed 4 factors predicted EE: hospital type, nurses' work shift, providing autonomy, and fostering participation in decision making. Gender, fostering participation in decision making, and department type were responsible for 5.9% of the DP variance, whereas facilitating goal attainment and nursing experience accounted for 8.3% of the PA variance. This study highlights the importance of the role of nurse leaders in improving work conditions and empowering and motivating nurses to decrease nurses' feelings of burnout, reduce turnover rates, and improve the quality of nursing care.

Partnerships between podiatrists and vascular surgeons in building effective wound care centers.

This practice memo, a collaborative effort between the Young Physicians' Program of the American Podiatric Medical Association and the Young Surgeons Committee of the Society for Vascular Surgery, is intended to aid podiatrists and vascular surgeons in the early years of their respective careers, especially those involved in the care of patients with chronic wounds. During these formative years, learning how to successfully establish an interprofessional partnership is crucial to provide the best possible care to this important population of patients.

Associations of Surgeon and Hospital Volumes with Outcome for Free Tissue Transfer by Using the National Taiwan Population Health Care Data from 2001 to 2012.

Greater hospital case volumes are associated with improved outcomes for high-risk procedures. The hospital-outcome association for complex but low-mortality procedures and the association between surgeon versus hospital case volume and surgical outcomes have been less explored. The authors examined the association between surgeon and hospital volume and the success for free tissue transfer (free flap) surgery. The authors hypothesized that there would be positive associations between hospital and surgeon volume and the success of free flap surgery.

Legacy of Polio-Use of India's Social Mobilization Network for Strengthening of the Universal Immunization Program in India.

The Social Mobilization Network (SMNet) has been lauded as one of the most successsful community engagement strategies in public health for its role in polio elimination in India. The UNICEF-managed SMNet was created as a strategy to eradicate polio by engaging >7000 frontline social mobilizers to advocate for vaccination in some of the most underserved, marginalized, and at-risk communities in India. This network focused initially on generating demand for polio vaccination but later expanded its messaging to promote routine immunization and other health and sanitation interventions related to maternal and children's health. As an impact of the network's interventions, in collaboration with other eradication efforts, these high-risk pockets witnessed an increase in full routine immunization coverage. The experience of the SMNet offers lessons for health-system strengthening for social mobilization and promoting positive health behaviors for other priority health programs like the Universal Immunization Program.

Use of Dedicated Mobile Teams and Polio Volunteer Community Mobilizers to Increase Access to Zero-Dose Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and Routine Childhood Immunizations in Settlements at High Risk for Polio Transmission in Northern Nigeria.

The Polio Eradication Initiative in Nigeria, which started >20 years ago, faced many challenges, including initial denial, resistance from communities, and prolonged regional safety concerns. These challenges led into the structuring of the response including the development of the National Emergency Action Plan, improved partner coordination and government engagement, and the establishment of a Polio Emergency Operations Centre. Although monthly supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) continued, the targeting of settlements at high risk for polio transmission with routine immunization (RI) and other selected primary healthcare (PHC) services using dedicated mobile teams and volunteer community mobilizers (VCMs) became a key strategy for interrupting polio transmission in the high-risk areas. These efforts could have contributed to the wild poliovirus-free 2-year period between 24 July 2014 and 11 August 2016, when 2 cases of the virus were reported from Borno State, Northern Nigeria.