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Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities - Top 30 Publications

Flexible Adult Acquired Flatfoot Deformity: Comparison Between Weight-Bearing and Non-Weight-Bearing Measurements Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography.

The 3-dimensional nature of adult acquired flatfoot deformity can be challenging to characterize using radiographs. We tested the hypothesis that measurements on weight-bearing (WB) cone-beam computed tomography (CT) images were more useful for demonstrating the severity of the deformity than non-weight-bearing (NWB) measurements.

Growth discordance of monoamniotic twin because of difference of cords diameter in forked umbilical cord: Case report.

A case of monochorionic-monoamniotic (MCMA) twin pregnancy with growth discordance because of difference of cord diameter in forked umbilical cord is reported.MCMA twins were diagnosed at 12 weeks of gestation and twin growth discordance was considered during the follow-up twice-weekly visits to the ultrasound and prenatal care units. The pregnancy was terminated at 34 weeks. Two live female babies weighing 2510 g and 1940 g were delivered. Examination of placenta and umbilical cords after birth showed that the 2 cords merged into a conjoint cord 1 cm from insertion to the placenta (forked umbilical cord). Placental color injection showed that the 2 fetuses shared the same placenta area. The diameters of the 2 cords were significantly different (1.5 vs 0.8 cm). This caused an unequal distribution of blood and nutrients, which is the real reason of twin growth discordance in this case.This case reveals that the diameter discordance of cords can be an important factor for twin growth discordance. Few relevant cases have previously been reported. Cords diameter measurement is suggested for ultrasound surveillance of twin growth discordance.

Osteogenesis imperfecta Type IV: a newly identified variant at position c.560 (G > T; p.Gly187Val) in the COL1A2 gene.

Osteogenesis imperfecta is a clinically heterogenous disease caused by defective collagen syntesis associated with a mutation in the COL1A1 or COL1A2 genes. In this report, we present a case of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type IV, seen in a female fetus with incurved femurs at 18 weeks of gestation. Molecular analysis of the newborn revealed a novel mutation at position c.560 (c.560 G > T) of the exon 12 in the COL1A2 gene; which lead to the glycine modification with valine (p.Gly187Val) at codon 187. The pregnancy follow-up was uneventful. After delivery, the newborn underwent biphosponat therapy and no fracture was detected until 1 year old.

Factor V congenital deficiency: about a case.

Factor V congenital deficiency is a rare coagulation disorder initially described by Owren in 1947 and known as para hemophilia. It is transmitted through autosomal-recessive inheritance and homozygous cases are usually symptomatic. Factor V is an essential cofactor in the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin by activated factor X. In the absence of factor V, thrombin generation is slowed down and fibrin formation is delayed. This results in a bleeding tendency. We report a case of factor V congenital deficiency in an infant with recurrent epistaxis.

Epidemiological profile of hemoglobinopathies: a cross-sectional and descriptive index case study.

Hemoglobinopathies are congenital disorders resultimg from hemoglobin abnormalities. Major forms are often severe, their management is difficult and associated with a great psychosocial impact on patients and their families. They are classified as rare diseases and are still insufficiently known by health professionals. This lack of knowledge is at the origin of diagnostic errors, delay in their management and therefore high morbidity and mortality rate for these patients. In 2008, the World Health Organization (WHO) has published data on hemoglobinopathies epidemiology: more than 330.000 cases of hemoglobinopathy occur each year (83% of cases of sickle cell anemia, 17 % of cases of thalassemia). Hemoglobin disorders are responsible for approximately 3.4% of deaths among people under the age of 5. At the global level, approximately 7% of pregnant women would be carriers of a form of thalassemia and 1% of couples are at risk. However, they are relatively frequent in some regions of the globe where consanguineous marriages are common. We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study based on two surveys, the first in May 2015 and the second in June of the same year. It was performed in the immunization days to deliver pneumococcal vaccine to the index cases and it was aimed to describe the epidemiological features of families at risk of hemoglobinopathies (index case study), whose index cases were treated in the Department of Pediatrics at the Provincial Hospital El Idrisi, Kenitra, Morocco. After having collected the epidemiological data from patients, laboratory tests were performed including: blood count with red blood cells morphological assessment using the MGG assay and automatic numbering of reticulocytes; hemoglobin electrophoresis at alkaline pH (8.8) and then at acid pH (5.4) on agarose gel and densitometric integration. 275 patients had laboratory profiles compatible with hemoglobinopathy. The majority of these patients were born to consanguineous marriages (83.1%) and came from the north regions of Morocco. This family survey allowed to identify families at risk with a high frequency of sickle cell anemia. Our results confirm the existence of hemoglobinopathies variants among Moroccan population.

Von Willebrand's disease: case report and review of literature.

Von Willebrand Disease (VWD) is the most common human inherited bleeding disorder due to a defect of Von Willebrand Factor (VWF), which a glycoprotein crucial for platelet adhesion to the subendothelium after vascular injury. VWD include quantitative defects of VWF, either partial (type 1 with VWF levels < 50 IU/dL) or virtually total (type 3 with undetectable VWF levels) and also qualitative defects of VWF (type 2 variants with discrepant antigenic and functional VWF levels). The most bleeding forms of VWD usually do not concern type 1 patients with the mildest VWF defects (VWF levels between 30 and 50IU/dL). Von willebrand factor is a complex multimeric protein with two functions: it forms a bridge between the platelets and areas of vascular damage and it binds to and stabilizes factor VIII, which is necessary for the clotting cascade. By taking a clinical history of bleeding (mucocutaneous bleeding symptoms suggestive of a primary haemostatic disorder, a quantitative or qualitative abnormality of VWF is possible) it is important to think about VWD and to make the appropriate diagnosis. If the VWD is suspected diagnostic tests should include an activated partial thromboplastin time, bleeding time, factor VIII: C Ristocetin cofactor and vWF antigen. Additional testing of ristocetin induced plattlet adhesion (RIPA) the multimeric structure and collagen binding test and genanalysis allow diagnosing the different types of von. Willebrand Disease. The treatment of choice in mild forms is the synthetic agent desmopressin. In patients with severe type 1, type 2B, 2N and type 3 or in people who do not response to desmopressin, the appropriate treatment is a factor VIII concentrate that is rich of VWF. We report a case of infant in 27-month-old boy who had been referred due to haemorrhagic shock. His birth histories, his familie's social history and developmental milestones were unremarkable. He was born at full term with no antenatal or perinatal complications. Prior to the symptoms, the child was on a normal diet and was thriving appropriately. The child presented one days before his admission trauma to the inner face of the lower lip that caused an external acute bleeding loss. The laboratory data showed unfortunately, the most severe form of Von Willebrand's Disease; Type 3. The management was based on erythrocyte and fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) transfusions with administration of factor VII with good evolution.

A rare cause of exertional dry cough: agenesis of the left pulmonary artery associated with pulmonary hypoplasia.

Agenesis of the left pulmonary artery associated with hypoplasia of the ipsilateral lung is a rare congenital malformation in children; it can be discovered fortuitously or because of the presence of recurrent respiratory infections. Diagnosis is based on thoracic angioscanner. Treatment is essentially conservative. We report the case of a 6-year old child with agenesis of the left pulmonary artery associated with hypoplasia of the ipsilateral lung detected because of exertional dry cough.

Prenatal diagnosis of caudal regression syndrome and omphalocele in a fetus of a diabetic mother.

The caudal regression syndrome is defined as total or partial agenesis of the sacrum and lumbar spine, frequently associated with other developmental malformations (orthopedic, neurological, genito-urinary, gastrointestinal…). Prenatal diagnosis is possible through fetal ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A case of fetal caudal regression syndrome with omphalocele from a diabetic mother is presented, demonstrating the sonographic, MRI, CT and X-Ray features diagnostic. We will also discuss neonatal findings, risk factors and prognosis of this condition.

Iridodonesis.

Patent Foramen Ovale after Cryptogenic Stroke - Assessing the Evidence for Closure.

Patent Foramen Ovale Closure or Anticoagulation vs. Antiplatelets after Stroke.

Trials of patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure to prevent recurrent stroke have been inconclusive. We investigated whether patients with cryptogenic stroke and echocardiographic features representing risk of stroke would benefit from PFO closure or anticoagulation, as compared with antiplatelet therapy.

Long-Term Outcomes of Patent Foramen Ovale Closure or Medical Therapy after Stroke.

Whether closure of a patent foramen ovale reduces the risk of recurrence of ischemic stroke in patients who have had a cryptogenic ischemic stroke is unknown.

Marfan's Syndrome with Ectopia Lentis.

Patent Foramen Ovale Closure or Antiplatelet Therapy for Cryptogenic Stroke.

The efficacy of closure of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) in the prevention of recurrent stroke after cryptogenic stroke is uncertain. We investigated the effect of PFO closure combined with antiplatelet therapy versus antiplatelet therapy alone on the risks of recurrent stroke and new brain infarctions.

Prevalence and Prognostic Significance of Left Ventricular Noncompaction in Patients Referred for Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

Presence of prominent left ventricular trabeculation satisfying criteria for left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) on routine cardiac magnetic resonance examination is frequently encountered; however, the clinical and prognostic significance of these findings remain elusive. This registry aimed to assess LVNC prevalence by 4 current criteria and to prospectively evaluate an association between diagnosis of LVNC by these criteria and adverse events.

The spectrum of structural and functional network alterations in malformations of cortical development.

Neuroimaging studies of malformations of cortical development have mainly focused on the characterization of the primary lesional substrate, while whole-brain investigations remain scarce. Our purpose was to assess large-scale brain organization in prevalent cortical malformations. Based on experimental evidence suggesting that distributed effects of focal insults are modulated by stages of brain development, we postulated differential patterns of network anomalies across subtypes of malformations. We studied a cohort of patients with focal cortical dysplasia type II (n = 63), subcortical nodular heterotopia (n = 44), and polymicrogyria (n = 34), and compared them to 82 age- and sex-matched controls. Graph theoretical analysis of structural covariance networks indicated a consistent rearrangement towards a regularized architecture characterized by increased path length and clustering, as well as disrupted rich-club topology, overall suggestive of inefficient global and excessive local connectivity. Notably, we observed a gradual shift in network reconfigurations across subgroups, with only subtle changes in focal cortical dysplasia type II, moderate effects in heterotopia and maximal effects in polymicrogyria. Analysis of resting state functional connectivity also revealed gradual network changes, with most marked rearrangement in polymicrogyria; contrary to findings in the structural domain, however, functional architecture was characterized by decreases in both local and global parameters. Diverging results in the structural and functional domain were supported by formal structure-function coupling analysis. Our findings support the concept that time of insult during corticogenesis impacts the severity of topological network reconfiguration. Specifically, late-stage malformations, typified by polymicrogyria, may selectively disrupt the formation of large-scale cortico-cortical networks and thus lead to a more profound impact on whole-brain organization than early stage disturbances of predominantly radial migration patterns observed in cortical dysplasia type II, which likely affect a relatively confined cortical territory.

Therapeutic pipeline for atopic dermatitis: End of the drought?

Until the past year, our therapeutic armamentarium for treating atopic dermatitis (AD) was still primarily topical corticosteroids and, for more severe disease, systemic immunosuppressants. The pipeline of more targeted topical and systemic therapies is expanding based on our growing understanding of the mechanism for AD and is particularly focused on suppressing the skewed immune activation. Most agents are in phase 2 clinical trials. Crisaborole, a topical phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor, became available in late 2016 in the United States for mild-to-moderate AD, with other PDE4 inhibitors, an agonist of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, Janus kinase inhibitors, and commensal organisms also in trials for topical application. The first highly effective mAb for AD, dupilumab, targets the IL-4/IL-13 receptor and was approved in early 2017 in the United States for moderate-to-severe adult AD. Other biologics similarly inhibit TH2 cytokines (thymic stromal lymphopoietin, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and the itch-specific cytokine IL-31 and their receptors) or TH22/TH17 cytokines, levels of which are increased in lesional skin. Orally administered small-molecule inhibitors that suppress inflammation (targeting chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecules expressed on TH2 lymphocytes, PDE4, the histamine 4 receptor, and Janus kinase) or specifically itching (eg, NK1R inhibitors) are also being studied. Comparing biomarkers with individual responses to experimental agents will help to determine subphenotypes within AD that predict prognosis and treatment responses.

Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy and RNA Foci in Patients With Myotonic Dystrophy.

The most common cause of Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) is an intronic CTG repeat expansion in TCF4. Expanded CUG repeat RNA colocalize with splicing factor, muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1), in nuclear foci in endothelium as a molecular hallmark. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a neuromuscular disorder caused by a CTG repeat expansion in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of DMPK. In this study, we examine for RNA-MBNL1 foci in endothelial cells of FECD subjects with DM1, test the hypothesis that DM1 patients are at risk for FECD, and determine prevalence of TCF4 and DMPK expansions in a FECD cohort.

Association of congenital anomalies with fracture of spine, trunk, and upper and lower limbs among young people: A population-based matched cohort study in Taiwan.

According to the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theory, congenital anomalies are caused by kidney malfunctions, which decreased the bone quality, and may eventually result in bone fractures. This retrospective cohort study investigated the relationship between congenital anomalies and fracture of spine, trunk, and upper and lower limbs in young people. We utilized data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. This study included patients with congenital anomalies (International Classification of Diseases/ICD-9 code: 740-759) and a comparison group of patients without congenital anomalies. Cases evaluated were fracture of spine and trunk (ICD-9 codes: 805-809), fracture of upper limbs (ICD-9 codes: 810-819), and fracture of lower limbs (ICD-9 codes: 820-829). Our study shows that in comparison to the control group, patients with congenital anomalies are 1.11 times more likely to develop fractures. This is the first documented research study that supports the TCM theory that "the Kidney governs the bones, and healthy bones give the body stabilization and prevent fracture."

A Mal De Meleda patient with severe flexion contractures of hands and feet: A case report in West China.

Palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) is a genetically heterogeneous group of skin diseases, which is characterized by erythema and hyperkeratosis. Mal de Meleda (MDM) is a rare type of PPK with an estimated prevalence in the general population of 1 in 100,000.

Surgical treatment for lumbar hyperlordosis after resection of a spinal lipoma associated with spina bifida: A case report.

A hyperlordosis deformity of the lumbar spine is relatively rare, and surgical treatment has not been comprehensively addressed. In this case report, we describe the clinical presentation, surgical treatment, and medium-term follow-up of a patient presenting with a progressive lumbar hyperlordosis deformity after resection of a spinal lipoma associated with spina bifida.

Oral tetrahydrouridine and decitabine for non-cytotoxic epigenetic gene regulation in sickle cell disease: A randomized phase 1 study.

Sickle cell disease (SCD), a congenital hemolytic anemia that exacts terrible global morbidity and mortality, is driven by polymerization of mutated sickle hemoglobin (HbS) in red blood cells (RBCs). Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) interferes with this polymerization, but HbF is epigenetically silenced from infancy onward by DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1).

Buprenorphine for the Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome.

Buprenorphine for the Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome.

Can Left Ventricular Noncompaction Be Acquired, and Can It Disappear?

Pulmonary Right Ventricular Resynchronization in Congenital Heart Disease: Acute Improvement in Right Ventricular Mechanics and Contraction Efficiency.

Electromechanical discoordination may contribute to long-term pulmonary right ventricular (RV) dysfunction in patients after surgery for congenital heart disease. We sought to evaluate changes in RV function after temporary RV cardiac resynchronization therapy.

Absence of Sigma 1 Receptor Accelerates Photoreceptor Cell Death in a Murine Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa.

Sigma 1 Receptor (Sig1R) is a novel therapeutic target in neurodegenerative diseases, including retinal disease. Sig1R-/- mice have late-onset retinal degeneration with ganglion cell loss that worsens under stress. Whether Sig1R plays a role in maintaining other retinal neurons is unknown, but was investigated here using rd10 mice, a model of severe photoreceptor degeneration.

Buprenorphine for the Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome.

Buprenorphine for the Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome.

Heart Failure Is Common and Under-Recognized in Patients With Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy/Dysplasia.

Heart failure (HF) prevalence in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) varies depending on study cohort and is not well characterized. This study sought to determine prevalence and predictors of HF in ARVC/D.