PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

- Top 30 Publications

Neurology Concepts: Young Women and Ischemic Stroke: Evaluation and Management in the Emergency Department.

Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the incidence of ischemic stroke is highest in older populations, incidence of ischemic stroke in adults has been rising particularly rapidly among young (e.g. premenopausal) women. The evaluation and timely diagnosis of ischemic stroke in young women presents a challenging situation in the emergency department, due to a range of sex-specific risk factors and to broad differentials. The goals of this concepts paper are to summarize existing knowledge regarding the evaluation and management of young women with ischemic stroke in the acute setting.

A matter of life and death.

Cases concerning the withdrawal or withholding of artificial nutrition and hydration from patients in a vegetative or minimally conscious state raise difficult medical, legal and ethical questions including the diagnosis and classification of disorders of consciousness, the legal processes to be followed, and the legal and ethical principles to be applied when making decisions. There is also an issue as to whether it is necessary or appropriate for such decisions to be taken by judges. This article, based on a lecture given in Oxford in October 2016, considers a number of these issues and concludes that any consideration of the question from the patient's point of view must include an objective analysis of what is in his or her best interests, as well as subjective expressions of wishes and feelings. Whilst noting that it has been suggested that applications to the court should be confined to those cases where there is a dispute as to whether withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH) would be in the patient's best interests, the author proposes that, until such time as we have greater clarity and understanding about the disorders of consciousness, and about the legal and ethical principles to be applied, there remains a need for independent oversight and that applications to the court should continue to be obligatory in all cases where the withdrawal of ANH is proposed, at least for the time being.

A combined randomised and observational study of surgery for fractures in the distal radius in the elderly (CROSSFIRE)-a study protocol.

Fractures of the distal radius are common and occur in all age groups. The incidence is high in older populations due to osteoporosis and increased falls risk. Considerable practice variation exists in the management of distal radius fractures in older patients ranging from closed reduction with cast immobilisation to open reduction with plate fixation. Plating is currently the most common surgical treatment. While there is evidence showing no significant advantage for some forms of surgical fixation over conservative treatment, and no difference between different surgical techniques, there is a lack of evidence comparing two of the most common treatments used: closed reduction and casting versus plating. Surgical management involves significant costs and risks compared with conservative management. High-level evidence is required to address practice variation, justify costs and to provide the best clinical outcomes for patients.

The association between socioeconomic status and subclinical atherosclerosis in a rural Bangladesh population.

In Bangladesh, CVD accounts for the majority of non-communicable mortality. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of socioeconomic status (SES) on subclinical atherosclerosis measured as carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in a rural Bangladesh population.

Dirty Laundry: Drug Formulary Exclusions.

Culture and Moral Distress: What's the Connection and Why Does It Matter?

Culture is learned behavior shared among members of a group and from generation to generation within that group. In health care work, references to "culture" may also function as code for ethical uncertainty or moral distress concerning patients, families, or populations. This paper analyzes how culture can be a factor in patient-care situations that produce moral distress. It discusses three common, problematic situations in which assumptions about culture may mask more complex problems concerning family dynamics, structural barriers to health care access, or implicit bias. We offer sets of practical recommendations to encourage learning, critical thinking, and professional reflection among students, clinicians, and clinical educators.

A Bibliometric Analysis of Highly Cited and High Impact Occupational Therapy Publications by American Authors.

A bibliometric analysis was completed of peer-reviewed literature from 1991-2015, written by American occupational therapists, to examine US high impact scholarship with "occupational therapy" and "occupational therapist(s)" used as keywords to search journal articles' publication title, abstract, author details, and keywords. Results included 1,889 journal articles from 1991-2015 published by American occupational therapists as first or corresponding author. Sixty-nine articles attained a TotalCitation2015 ≥ 50 and 151 attained a Citation2015 ≥ 5 indicating that they were the most highly cited literature produced in this period. Although the majority (58%) of this literature was published in occupational therapy-specific journals, 41% was published in interdisciplinary journals. Results illustrate that the volume of highly cited American occupational therapy peer-reviewed literature has grown over the last two decades. There is need for the profession to strategize methods to enhance the publication metrics of occupational therapy-specific journals to reduce the loss of high quality publications to external periodicals.

CH/π Interactions in Carbohydrate Recognition.

Many carbohydrate-binding proteins contain aromatic amino acid residues in their binding sites. These residues interact with carbohydrates in a stacking geometry via CH/π interactions. These interactions can be found in carbohydrate-binding proteins, including lectins, enzymes and carbohydrate transporters. Besides this, many non-protein aromatic molecules (natural as well as artificial) can bind saccharides using these interactions. Recent computational and experimental studies have shown that carbohydrate-aromatic CH/π interactions are dispersion interactions, tuned by electrostatics and partially stabilized by a hydrophobic effect in solvated systems.

An Inconsolable Loss.

A nurse's injury costs her far more than mobility.

Omission of High-Alert Medications: A Hidden Danger.

The Pennsylvania Patient Safety Reporting System is a confidential, statewide Internet reporting system to which all Pennsylvania hospitals, outpatient-surgery facilities, birthing centers, and abortion facilities must file information on incidents and serious events.Safety Monitor is a column from Pennsylvania's Patient Safety Authority, the authority that informs nurses on issues that can affect patient safety and presents strategies they can easily integrate into practice. For more information on the authority, visit www.patientsafetyauthority.org. For the original article discussed in this column or for other articles on patient safety, click on "Patient Safety Advisories" and then "Advisory Library" in the left-hand navigation menu.

Ethical Nursing Care When the Terminally Ill Patient Seeks Death.

Could Emotional Intelligence Make Patients Safer?

: The vast majority of medical errors occurring each year involve faulty communication. For this reason, it's essential that we identify skills that support accurate communication and information transfer as well as optimum patient-centered care, team function, and patient safety. Research in nursing and other disciplines has demonstrated that emotional intelligence abilities improve communication, support constructive conflict resolution, and improve individual and team performance. Although further studies are needed, these findings suggest emotional intelligence ability can positively affect patient safety.

The Growing Need for Diverse Blood Donors.

: Research shows that phenotype matching can improve the outcomes of people who receive repeated transfusions. In addition, the demographics of the United States are shifting, and more ethnically and racially diverse donors are needed. These factors have health implications and require ongoing efforts to ensure a safe and adequate U.S. blood supply. Nurses can help to develop and implement strategies to increase the number and diversity of blood donors, ensuring donations better match the needs of transfusion recipients daily and in the event of a public health emergency.

Glossolalia.

Forever Hold Your Peace: When Preprocedure Safety Concerns Are Missed.

A near-miss experience highlights a limitation of time-out protocols.

Renewal.

Permission.

Adjuvant steroid therapy in community-acquired pneumonia.

Despite medical advances, pneumonia is a leading cause of death worldwide. Because inflammation is a key defense mechanism, adjuvant corticosteroid therapy has long been considered but never widely recommended to treat pneumonia. New research is exploring potential benefits of this therapy, including reduced time to clinical stability, reduced hospital stay, reduced rates of treatment failure, and prevention of complications.

Sick sinus syndrome.

Completion lymph node dissection in patients with melanoma and positive sentinel lymph node biopsy.

Melanoma is a highly aggressive cancer that represents a significant disease burden, making diagnosis and appropriate control of disease vital for improving morbidity and mortality. The most recent guidelines for melanoma treatment advise performing a sentinel lymph node biopsy for intermediate thickness melanomas, with subsequent completion lymph node dissection (CLND) if sentinel nodes are positive. This guideline is controversial due to the limited availability of data on this topic. CLND is an extensive surgery with known risks and complications and a small survival benefit. However, in patients without significant comorbidities and at low risk for surgery, the survival benefit outweighs the procedural risk. This article reviews CLND and the current recommendations.

An uncommon complication of laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy.

Chylous ascites is an uncommon complication of laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy, occurring when milky chyle from the lymphatic system leaks into the peritoneal cavity. This can occur after trauma or be caused by obstruction of the lymphatic system. Treatment may include a fat-free diet, total parenteral nutrition, subcutaneous somatostatin, lymphangiography, and/or surgical closure of the leaking lymph vessel.

Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines: A Comprehensive Update of Evidence and Recommendations.

Cannabis use is common in North America, especially among young people, and is associated with a risk of various acute and chronic adverse health outcomes. Cannabis control regimes are evolving, for example toward a national legalization policy in Canada, with the aim to improve public health, and thus require evidence-based interventions. As cannabis-related health outcomes may be influenced by behaviors that are modifiable by the user, evidence-based Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines (LRCUG)-akin to similar guidelines in other health fields-offer a valuable, targeted prevention tool to improve public health outcomes.

Safety/tolerability of the anti-semaphorin 4D Antibody VX15/2503 in a randomized phase 1 trial.

To evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) of VX15/2503 in a randomized, single-dose, dose-escalation, double-blind, placebo-controlled study enrolling adult patients with MS.

Access to and Payment for Office-Based Buprenorphine Treatment in Ohio.

Office-based opiate agonist therapy has dramatically expanded access to medication-assisted treatment over the past decade but has also led to increased buprenorphine diversion.

Now I cuss less about ICUS.

Activated kinases in ALL: time to act.

Human megakaryocytes: finding the root.

Looking up for AML in Down syndrome.

Counteracting dysfunction of regulatory T cells in organ transplantation.

Physical activity, cognitive decline, and risk of dementia: 28 year follow-up of Whitehall II cohort study.

Objective To test the hypotheses that physical activity in midlife is not associated with a reduced risk of dementia and that the preclinical phase of dementia is characterised by a decline in physical activity.Design Prospective cohort study with a mean follow-up of 27 years.Setting Civil service departments in London (Whitehall II study).Participants 10 308 participants aged 35-55 years at study inception (1985-88). Exposures included time spent in mild, moderate to vigorous, and total physical activity assessed seven times between 1985 and 2013 and categorised as "recommended" if duration of moderate to vigorous physical activity was 2.5 hours/week or more.Main outcome measures A battery of cognitive tests was administered up to four times from 1997 to 2013, and incident dementia cases (n=329) were identified through linkage to hospital, mental health services, and mortality registers until 2015.Results Mixed effects models showed no association between physical activity and subsequent 15 year cognitive decline. Similarly, Cox regression showed no association between physical activity and risk of dementia over an average 27 year follow-up (hazard ratio in the "recommended" physical activity category 1.00, 95% confidence interval 0.80 to 1.24). For trajectories of hours/week of total, mild, and moderate to vigorous physical activity in people with dementia compared with those without dementia (all others), no differences were observed between 28 and 10 years before diagnosis of dementia. However, physical activity in people with dementia began to decline up to nine years before diagnosis (difference in moderate to vigorous physical activity -0.39 hours/week; P=0.05), and the difference became more pronounced (-1.03 hours/week; P=0.005) at diagnosis.Conclusion This study found no evidence of a neuroprotective effect of physical activity. Previous findings showing a lower risk of dementia in physically active people may be attributable to reverse causation-that is, due to a decline in physical activity levels in the preclinical phase of dementia.